The Apparatus Architect

In the last installment of The Apparatus Architect (November 2010), we reviewed some concepts for maneuvering through the bid-procurement process to ensure your department and community will receive competitive bids for your next piece of apparatus...


In the last installment of The Apparatus Architect (November 2010), we reviewed some concepts for maneuvering through the bid-procurement process to ensure your department and community will receive competitive bids for your next piece of apparatus. Much of the groundwork that is established early...


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Some of our earlier articles in The Apparatus Architect series emphasized the importance of defining the mission of the apparatus and developing a comprehensive listing of tools, equipment and hose that would be carried on the unit. The ability to properly lay out the needed pieces of equipment within the body while allowing space for future growth will lead to a properly proportioned apparatus and not one limited in size by the depth of the bay in your fire station.

TOM SHAND, a Firehouse® contributing editor, is a 36-year veteran of the fire service and works with Michael Wilbur at Emergency Vehicle Response, consulting on a variety of fire apparatus and fire department master-planning issues. MICHAEL WILBUR , a Firehouse® contributing editor, is a lieutenant in the New York City Fire Department, assigned to Ladder Company 27 in the Bronx, and has served on the FDNY Apparatus Purchasing Committee. He consults on a variety of apparatus-related issues around the country. For further information, access his website at www.emergencyvehicleresponse.com.