Safety - You Could Get Hurt Without It!

Safety - You Could Get Hurt Without It! Time Required: Two Hours Materials:    · Audio-visual equipment to project any visuals    · Fire and Rescue Death and Injury Statistics References:    · Essentials of Fire...


Safety - You Could Get Hurt Without It!

Time Required: Two Hours

Materials:

   · Audio-visual equipment to project any visuals

   · Fire and Rescue Death and Injury Statistics

References:

   · Essentials of Fire Fighting, 4th Edition, IFSTA

   · NFPA Firefighter Death and Injury Statistics for 1999

   · Emergency Care, 8th Edition, Brady

PREPARATION:

Motivation:

Objective (SPO): 1-1

The student will demonstrate an increased awareness of the importance of safety in the fire and rescue service and a better understanding of actions that can be taken to contribute to a safer work environment.

Overview:

Safety - You Could Get Hurt Without It!

   · Introduction to Safety

   · Station Safety

   · Vehicle Safety

   · EMS Safety

   · Fireground Safety

   · Health and Safety programs

Safety – You Could Get Hurt Without It!

SPO 1-1 The student will demonstrate an increased awareness of the importance of safety in the fire and rescue service and a better understanding of actions that can be taken to contribute to a safer work environment.

EO 1-1 Identify the need for and benefits of having a safer work environment.

EO 1-2 Identify items within the station that can contribute to a safer environment.

EO 1-3 Identify items related to operating or working around emergency vehicles that can contribute to a safer environment.

EO 1-4 Identify items related to providing emergency medical care that can contribute to a safer environment

EO 1-5 Identify items related to fireground operations that can contribute to a safer environment.

EO 1-6 Identify items related to health and safety programs that can contribute to a safer and healthier environment.

This drill should be an interactive discussion rather than a lecture. The group leader should encourage participants to share personal observations or experiences related to safety within the fire and rescue service. Local accident reports may also be beneficial to support the discussion and localize the topic. This drill is intended to be an overview of safety as it relates to the fire and rescue service. More time can be devoted on any particular topic within the outline based on the needs of the department.

I. Introduction to Safety (1-1)

A. Why is safety important to the fire and rescue service?

   1. In 1999, 88,500 firefighters were injured in the line of duty according to the NFPA

       a. Injuries by type of duty

          1) Fireground activities - 45,550 or 51.5%

          2) Non-fire emergencies - 13,565 or 15.3%

          3) Training - 7,705 or 8.7%

          4) Responding to or returning from alarms - 5,890 or 6.7%

          5) Other on-duty activities - 15,790 or 17.8%

      b. Injuries by nature of injury

          1) Strains, sprains, muscular pain - 41,020 or 46.4%

          2) Wounds, cuts, bleeding, bruises - 17,070 or 19.3%

          3) Burns (fire or chemical) - 4,865 or 5.5%

          4) Thermal stress (frostbite, heat exhaustion) - 4,420 or 5.0%

          5) Smoke or gas inhalation - 4,035 or 4.6%

          6) Eye irritation - 4,010 or 4.5%

          7) Dislocations, fractures - 2,910 or 3.3%

          8) Other - 10,170 or 11.4%

      c. Causes of injury

          1) Overexertion, strain - 26,727 or 30.2%

          2) Falls, slipping, jumping - 20,797 or 23.5%

          3) Exposure to fire products - 13,275 or 15.0%

          4) Stepped on, contact with objects - 8,408 or 9.5%

          5) Struck by an object - 7,080 or 8.0%

          6) Extreme weather - 4,071 or 4.6%

          7) Exposure to chemicals or radiation - 2,743 or 3.1%

          8) Caught, trapped - 1,062 or 1.2%

          9) Other - 4,337 or 4.9%

  2. In 1999, 112 firefighters lost their lives in the line of duty according to the NFPA

      a. Deaths by type of duty

          1) Fireground activities - 54 or 48.2%

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