Handling Hoselines and Foam Application

COURSE: PROTECTIVE ENVELOPE AND FOAM SESSION REFERENCE: 3-1 TOPIC: HANDLING HOSELINES AND FOAM APPLICATION - LECTURE/PRACTICAL TIME REQUIRED: 3 HOURS MATERIALS: Overhead Projector, MFRI OHT's, Hose and appliances, Foam and foam...


  3. Protein, fluoroprotein foams - .16 gpm foam solution per square foot

  4. Unignited spills may require less application rate due to lack of radiant heat, open flame, or thermal

      draft

  5. Application problem

      a. 12' X 100' spill of #2 fuel oil = 1200 square feet

      b. AFFF application rate - .10 gpm solution per square foot of fire

      c. 120 gpm solution (.10 X 1200) simply stated: "10% of the fire area equals gpm foam water

          solution"

 

IV. Assembling a Foam Fire Stream (in-line proportioner) (3-1-4)

A. Select proper foam concentrate for involved fuel

B. Check eductor and nozzle for hydraulic compatibility

C. Check concentration listing

  1. Must match eductor percentage rating

  2. If adjustable, set to proper concentration setting

D. Attach eductor to hose capable of flowing rated capacity of eductor and nozzle

  1. Avoid hose kinks

  2. Prevent water turbulence that will adversely affect eductor operation

      a. Avoid connections to discharge elbows

      b. Make sure valves are completely open

E. Connect attack hoseline and nozzle to eductor

F. Place open foam concentrate containers at the eductor so operation may be carried out uninterrupted

G. Place eductor suction hose into concentrate - bottom of concentrate must be no more than six feet (2m) below the eductor

H. Increased water supply pressure as required

I. At conclusion of operation, rinse and clean all foam appliances, tanks, and pumps with lukewarm water whenever possible.

 

V. Tactical Considerations for Foam Operations (3-1-5)

A. Desirable qualities of foam

  1. Flows freely and covers fuel surface rapidly

  2. Forms tough cohesive blanket and is vapor tight

  3. Resists heat and fuel pick up, thus resisting break down

  4. Retains and holds water to seal against hot metal surface (wicking)

B. Tactical considerations (2-dimensional combustible and flammable liquids incidents)

  1. Utilize accountability and buddy system within ICS

  2. Utilize full protective equipment including SCBA (monitored by safety officer)

  3. Preferable to utilize pair of matched air aspirating nozzles – 1 1/3", 2" or 2 1/2" attack lines

  4. Attack from uphill and upwind whenever possible

  5. Remember that foam lines do not provide any thermal protection from heat for handline crews

  6. Minimize personnel in flammable liquids/rescue area - never enter unfoamed spill area

  7. Vapor seal, once established, must be maintained. AFFF drain down time foam quarter life is the

      time it takes to lose 25% of its water - three minutes in a lab - two minutes in a fire

  8. Sun and wind break down foam, therefore the more foam that is applied, the longer it will blanket

     the area

  9. Continually blanket area when emergency service responders and victims are in the spill or fire area

  10. Establish well-protected rescue path with back-up foam lines (2 1/2" minimum) and turrets

       whenever possible (foam should at least cover toe of boots)

C. Operations

  1. Whenever spill area or hazard is involved, apply foam in massive quantity

  2. Assemble enough product to do the job - half extinguished fire can reignite

  3. Apply foam gently in a rainfall, snowflake, or lob method

  4. Never aim or plunge the stream into the fuel spill

  5. Deflection method of bouncing foam off objects picks up additional air

  6. Application of foam can be with a wall of foam which is pushed gently across burning liquid surface

     (bounce method, rolling foam blanket)

  7. Nozzle person

      a. Watches and delivers foam – never lets go of line or turns back to fire

      b. Listens to pitch of pumper when using foam eductor - can listen to detect foam continuity

      c. Utilize predetermined hand signals

  8. Caution - EMERGENCY SERVICE RESPONDERS BEWARE

      a. Misuse of water at flammable liquids fire suppression operations is the most common

          mistake - causes break-up of foam blanket

      b. Failure to apply enough foam on a fire for a sustained period is the next prevalent mistake