The "Anatomy & Physiology" of the Structural Fireground - Part 1

Mark Emery explains why a competent fire officer must understand building construction.


Part 1 - Why a Competent Fire Officer Must Understand Building Construction Building construction is the anatomy and physiology of the structural fireground. Just as the human body must resist the assault of gravity and time, so must a building resist the assault of gravity and time. Just as...


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Please share photos of buildings and structural problems in your area. Provide your name, your agency and a brief description of the building and we will publish your discovery. It is likely that somebody out there has a similar structure that deserves focused strategic consideration.

MARK EMERY, EFO, is a shift battalion chief with the Woodinville, WA, Fire & Life Safety District. He is a graduate of the National Fire Academy's Executive Fire Officer program and an NFA instructor specialist. Emery received a bachelor of arts degree from California State University at Long Beach and is a partner with Fire Command Seattle LLC in King County, WA. He may be contacted at fci@usa.com or access his website www.competentcommand.com.

BUILDING 'ANATOMY' BUILDING 'PHYSIOLOGY'
Beams Stress
Columns Strain
Trusses Tension
Cables Compression
Steel Rods Shear
Connections Torsion
Wires
Pipes
Ducts