The "Anatomy & Physiology" Of the Structural Fireground

Following-up on last month's quick review of the five basic types of building construction, according to National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 220, Standard on Types of Building Construction (2006 edition), this article looks at Type I, Type II...


Following-up on last month's quick review of the five basic types of building construction, according to National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 220, Standard on Types of Building Construction (2006 edition), this article looks at Type I, Type II and Type IV building construction from a...


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Chamfering is the beveling of heavy timber edges. The theory was that this beveled chamfer would slow the ignition of the timber, the result of reducing the surface/mass of the normally sharply squared edges.

The next article will continue the strategic classification of building construction with the final two of the five types of building construction: Type III, ordinary, and Type V, wood frame ("unprotected combustible").

MARK EMERY, EFO, is a shift battalion chief with the Woodinville, WA, Fire & Life Safety District. He is a graduate of the National Fire Academy's Executive Fire Officer program and an NFA instructor specialist. Emery received a bachelor of arts degree from California State University at Long Beach and is a partner with Fire Command Seattle LLC in King County, WA. He may be contacted at fci@usa.com or access his website www.competentcommand.com.