Changing The Fire Service Culture

TOPIC: CHANGING THE FIRE SERVICE CULTURE TIME REQUIRED: TWO HOURS MATERIALS: APPROPRIATE AUDIO-VISUAL MATERIALS REFERENCES:Fire Department Safety Officer, 1st ed., International Fire Service Training Association.


TOPIC: CHANGING THE FIRE SERVICE CULTURE

TIME REQUIRED: TWO HOURS

MATERIALS: APPROPRIATE AUDIO-VISUAL MATERIALS

REFERENCES:Fire Department Safety Officer, 1st ed., International Fire Service Training Association.

PREPARATION:

MOTIVATION: Have you ever heard the expression that the fire service is one hundred years of tradition unhampered by progress. While this may be humorous, it also has some amount of truth associated with it. While we may have made great strides in some areas, we are still doing business the way we always have. Look at the firefighter line of duty death rate and note that it is being maintained even with the many improvements in safety that have been made.

OBJECTIVE (SPO):

The firefighter will demonstrate a general knowledge of the cultures that have evolved in the fire service and changes that need to take place to improve firefighter safety.

OVERVIEW:

CHANGING THE FIRE SERVICE CULTURE

* Traditions
* Recognizing Dangerous Situations
* Change

CHANGING THE FIRE SERVICE CULTURE

SPO: The firefighter will demonstrate a general knowledge of the cultures that have evolved in the fire service and changes that need to take place to improve firefighter safety.

EO 1-1 Identify fire service traditions that have compromised firefighter safety.

EO 1-2 Recognize dangerous situations that could result in injury or death to firefighters.

EO 1-3 Identify changes that need to take place to reduce the potential for injury and death to firefighters.

This drill would be best conducted as an interactive discussion that will provide an opportunity to reflect on where we have been, where we are now, and where we want to go. Each attendee should be encouraged to participate in the open discussion.

I. TRADITION (EO 1-1)

A. Remember when

          1. Basic fire training was only 60 hours and we did not talk about things like smoking

              cessation, proper diet, exercise, wellness, and mental health?
          

           2. Protective clothing may have consisted of a canvas coat, metal helmet, and no   

               turnout pants?


            3. Apparatus may have only carried two SCBA and they were in boxes somewhere

                out of easy access?
 

             4. We rode on the back step of the engine or maybe even in the hosebed or on the

                 running board?
 

             5. There was no incident command system as we know it today?
 

             6. A safety officer was something they had in industry?

 

B. Safety quiz

              1. Are you in good health and physical condition when you are on duty?

              2. Do you wear protective clothing and equipment appropriate for the incident?

              3. Are you seated and wearing a seatbelt whenever the apparatus is in motion?

              4. Do you watch for traffic as you exit or work around apparatus at the emergency

                   scene?

              5. Do you stay with your officer and crew when operating at the emergency scene?

              6. Do you use proper techniques when lifting?

              7. Do you know where the fire is at all times when you are working at a structure

                  fire?

               8. Do you use hand and power tools safely?

               9. Do you know what to do when lost or disoriented?

             10. Do you know when and how to call for help if you are in trouble?

 

C. Firefighter injuries for 2003 (NFPA)

             • 78,750 firefighter injuries

             • 48.3% of the injuries occurred on the fireground

             • 44.2% of the injuries were strains and sprains

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