Changing The Fire Service Culture

TOPIC: CHANGING THE FIRE SERVICE CULTURE TIME REQUIRED: TWO HOURS MATERIALS: APPROPRIATE AUDIO-VISUAL MATERIALS REFERENCES:Fire Department Safety Officer, 1st ed., International Fire Service Training Association.


             • 15,900 vehicle collisions involving emergency vehicles

 

D. Firefighter deaths for 2004 (USFA)

            • 107 line of duty deaths

            • 60.7% of the deaths were members of the volunteer fire and rescue service

            • 25.2% of the deaths occurred on the fireground

            • 45.7% of the deaths were due to heart attack

 

E. What has changed

             1. An unacceptable level of firefighter deaths and injuries which resulted in the

                 issuance of OSHA regulations such as the respiratory regulation and NFPA

                 standards such as NFPA 1500 and the professional qualification series

             2. Firefighter techniques, training, and equipment has improved

             3. Still requires human intervention and the associated human errors

II. RECOGNIZING DANGEROUS SITUATIONS (EO 1-2)

A. Risk identification

   1. Compile a list of all emergency and non-emergency operations and duties

   2. Consider worst possible conditions or potential events

   3. Sources to assist with identification process

      a. Department's loss prevention data

      b. National averages and trends from NFPA and U.S. Fire Administration

      c. Seek input and ideas from department personnel, trade journals, professional associations, and

          other service providers

      d. Other sources include risk management plans developed by local industry and hazardous

          substance sites, vulnerability analyses, and EPA plans

B. Risk Evaluation

   1. Evaluate identified risks for both frequency and severity

      a. Frequency is referred to as "incidence rate" and addresses likelihood of occurrence

      b. Severity addresses degree of seriousness for incident and measured in a variety of ways such as

          lost time away from work, cost of damage, cost of and time for repair or replacement of

          equipment, disruption of service, or legal costs

   2. Incidents of high frequency and high severity must have highest priority in risk analysis

 

C. Risk Prioritization
 

   1. Any risk with high probability of occurrence and serious consequences deserves immediate action

       and would be considered a high priority item

   2. Non-serious incidents with a low likelihood of occurrence are a lower priority and can be placed

       near bottom of action required list

 

D. Risk Control Techniques
 

   1. Risk avoidance

      a. Best risk control choice

      b. Personnel should avoid activities that creates risks

      c. Risk avoidance approach frequently is impractical
 

   2. Risk transfer

      a. Accomplished by physically transferring risk to someone else and through purchase of insurance

      b. Insurance does nothing to affect likelihood of occurrence

   3. Control measures

      a. Most common method for management of risk is adoption of effective control measures

      b. Will not eliminate risk but can reduce likelihood of occurrence or mitigate severity

      c. Safety, health, and wellness programs; ongoing training and education programs; and

          well-defined SOP's are effective control measures

      d. Measures instituted to control incident scene injuries include use of accountability systems, use of

          full protective clothing, mandatory respiratory protection program, training and education, and

          health and wellness SOP's
 

   4. Monitoring

      a. Ensures that system is dynamic and facilitates periodic reviews of entire program

      b. Any problems that occur in process have to be revised or modified

      c. Intent of a risk management plan is to develop a strategy for reducing inherent risks associated

          with fire department operations

      d. Operation of plan is a dynamic and aggressive process that must be monitored and revised at