Lessons Lost - Lessons Shared - Lessons Learned

An important conclusion was reached during the week just past. It is my opinion that I am a man with certain biases and pre-conceived notions.


Sadly far too many of you will go to a convention this year just to be entertained. You will form lines around the pretty girls in tight dresses or skimpy suits. You will cheer those with the slickest performances and clap for the people with the neatest PowerPoint programs, the ones with the most spinning and swirling tools on the screen. You may not remember a word of their lessons. This is both sad and inevitable.

This is they way our society has been conditioned by the media. Fewer people are reading books. More people are getting their news from the television or from the Internet. We know what happened in the world a couple of hours ago. We may remember what happened yesterday. Perhaps we know the lessons of the last six months.

Sadly our society does not remember the lessons of the past. Why else are the majority of our deaths and injuries happening in the same way and manner as in the days of yore? If all we know is today, we have a real problem.

I teach because I have learned from those who went before. Those who went before blazed a trail for me to follow. These people learned many lessons in their time and took great pains to make sure other people gained the benefit of their hard-earned lessons. They gave me the gift of knowledge.

A wise person once told me that the best way to keep a gift alive it to share it with someone else. That is my challenge to you this week. Learn as much as you can and then go out and share it with others. We need to come together in order to find our personal peace within the turbulent world wherein we find ourselves today. We will find this peace within the company of those who care and share.

Do not hog the good news. Do not come down with a case of lesson amnesia. Just make sure that you keep that knowledge moving along. If the knowledge dies than, sadly, someone we know may die. Ignore this lesson at your own peril. See you in Indianapolis.