The Importance of Motor Vehicle Record Check Programs

Knowing your drivers on- and off-duty driving habits and records is an important tool in both selecting and maintaining the safest drivers for your emergency vehicles.


Violations

What should you do when you receive notice of violations? That depends on the severity of the violation. Class A violations are cause for great concern. An individual who has a Class A violation within the past three (3) years normally receives a license suspension from the Department of Motor Vehicles which issued the license. Class A violations include driving while intoxicated, operating a vehicle during a period of suspension or revocation, or reckless driving. A full list of violations can be found at the end of this article.

VFIS Risk Control guidelines call for an eighteen (18) month suspension of driving privileges for anyone convicted of a Class A violation. Additionally, any of these individuals would also be required to attend an approved driver-improvement program or equivalent training, and be re-certified to operate emergency vehicles. It is important to note that unusual circumstances with individual cases should be evaluated on a one-to-one basis.

Class B violations are all moving violations not listed as Type A violations. An example is exceeding the posted speed limit. VFIS Risk Control guidelines recommend that any individual who has a combination of two (2) Class B moving violation convictions and/or chargeable accidents in a three (3) year period will be issued a warning letter from the chief officer or administrative officer of the emergency service organization. Any individual who has a combination of three (3) moving violation convictions and/or chargeable accidents in a three (3) year period will be issued a suspension of driving department vehicles for a period of ninety (90) days by the chief officer or administrative office of the emergency service organization.

Per the guidelines, any individual who has more than three (3) moving violation convictions or three (3) chargeable accidents or any combination of more than three (3) of the formerly stated violations in a three (3) year period will be issued a suspension of driving department vehicles for a period of one (1) year. In addition, the same individual would be required to complete an approved driver improvement program and be re-certified to operate emergency vehicles. Again, unusual circumstances with individual cases would be evaluated on a one-to-one basis.

Summary

It is critical for your emergency service organization to have some type of MVR program in place. Annual reporting, once seen as one of the best methods of risk reduction, now requires interim and even monthly activities to be completed. Ensure your organization's reputation by taking this problem seriously. You must take all reasonable steps today to provide a safe atmosphere for your emergency responders and the citizens you protect and serve.

Violations

Designation of Type A and Type B violations are based on a survey of state point systems. Violations receiving higher numbers of points are classed as Type A.

Type A Violations

  1. Driving while intoxicated.
  2. Driving under the influence of drugs.
  3. Negligent homicide arising out of the use of a motor vehicle (gross negligence).
  4. Operating during a period of suspension or revocation.
  5. Using a motor vehicle for the commission of a felony.
  6. Aggravated assault with a motor vehicle.
  7. Operating a motor vehicle without owner's authority.
  8. Permitting an unlicensed person to drive.
  9. Reckless driving.
  10. Hit and run driving.

Type B Violations

  • All moving violations not listed as Type A violations. (Exceeding posted speed limit is a Type B violation).

Note: Unusual circumstances with individual cases would be evaluated on a one-to-one basis.

Related Links