Loaded Cement Truck Vs. SUV: A Mighty Heavy Vehicle Extrication

Jeff Hood, Bill Lowe and Earl Watson discuss what happened when a fully loaded cement truck weighing 34 tons flipped over and landed on top of a sport utility vehicle, trapping both drivers.


For the officers and firefighters assigned to Clayton County, GA, Fire Department Station 5, Sept. 24, 2003, was going to get real busy, real soon. Just three hours into the crew’s shift, Engine 5 and Medic 5, an advanced life support (ALS) ambulance, were dispatched to a “vehicle accident...


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Training between flight crews and the department’s EMS personnel is conducted frequently. Additionally, Clayton County is directly adjacent to the Atlanta city limits, providing close access to Atlanta’s nationally recognized trauma centers. Clayton County paramedics frequently use helicopters for major trauma calls, so the familiarity between flight crews and medics is high, and several of the department’s paramedics work part time as flight medics.


Jeff Hood, EMT-P, is a deputy chief and supervises all fire suppression and EMS operations with the Clayton County, GA, Fire Department, where he has worked for 25 years. He is a Georgia EMT/Paramedic Instructor, was awarded a Georgia Governor’s Valor Proclamation for rescuing a police officer shot during a hostage standoff, and is a National Fire Service Staff and Command School Graduate. Bill Lowe, EMT-P, Ph.D., is a captain and shift supervisor with the Clayton County Fire Department, where he has worked for 25 years. He has a doctorate in human resource management, and is pursuing the National Fire Academy’s Executive Fire Officer Program. Earl Watson is a battalion chief and shift supervisor with the Clayton County Fire Department, where he has worked for 30 years. He has extensive experience with company and battalion level line operations, and has served as an elected board member of the department’s largest employee organization for over 15 years.