“Fire Reactants”: Filling A Fire Protection Gap

For decades, fire prevention efforts have focused primarily on three areas: detection, suppression and public fire education. However, despite advances in detection and suppression technology, there remains a gap in the overall scope of fire protection...


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State and local governments that recently passed tougher fire codes are starting to see the use of this technology as a means to fill the gap that exists in the fire-protection field. State and local fire marshals are conducting more and more widespread tests of products such as No-Burn. In many cases, state and local governments are using the technology themselves. For example, in late November, the State of Rhode Island mandated that the Christmas tree displayed in the State Capitol Building be treated with a non-toxic fire reactant from No-Burn.

The Perfect System?

Is there a perfect fire-protection system? “Sprinkler systems are an excellent means of fire suppression, but it is very impractical to think that the millions of homes in existence today will all be retrofitted with them, nor can the families that own these homes afford to have them installed,” Kish said. “At a fraction of the cost of a sprinkler system, you can have proactive protection that can literally stop a fire before it starts. While there is no doubt about the effectiveness of sprinkler systems, this technology certainly adds a another dimension to the fire-protection industry.”

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Photo courtesy of No-Burn Inc.
A view of the roof structure from each of the houses shows that the one in the middle, the untreated house, sustained the most extensive damage, while the two on either end that were treated were not damaged and were protected from the fire by the char-barrier.

He continued, “Our goal is to increase the time that a family has to either put a small fire out effectively and without immediate danger to themselves or to get out of the house and call the fire department. If the fire department is called, firefighters have a safer environment in which to operate, less smoke, less heat, a much smaller fire to put out, and their suppression and overhaul activities will mean less collateral damage to the structure. When the insurance claim is filed, the insurance company is obviously looking at a lower cost per claim. It is a win-win situation for everyone.”

Kish is quick to point out that this new technology works right along with existing technology.

“We certainly are not seeking to replace the proven systems that are in place today,” he said. “Sprinklers, for example, do what they are designed to do very well. If you had a building with a sprinkler system and it was treated with No-Burn, then I cannot think of a safer structure to be in. This technology certainly fills the gap and is a perfect addition to current fire detection and suppression measures or as a stand-alone preventative measure.”

For more information on No-Burn, call 800-989-8577 or visit www.noburn.com.


Jason P. Speller is a North Carolina Certified Firefighter III, Emergency Technical Rescue Technician and a North Carolina EMT-Intermediate. He has worked as a career firefighter in North Carolina and as a fire inspector and arson investigator in Virginia. Speller is the president of Fire Safety Technologies LLC, a North Carolina-based company that researches, develops and markets fire safety products. He also works as a consultant for the fire-retardant/reactant industry.