Firehouse® Interview: Las Vegas Fire Chief Mario H. Treviño

Editor-in-Chief Harvey Eisner interviews the fire service veteran who has led Las Vegas Fire & Rescue since 1996.


Mario H. Treviño has been the chief of Las Vegas Fire & Rescue since 1996. He has 28 years of experience in the fire service, having previously served with the Seattle Fire Department, where he rose through the ranks to the level of deputy fire chief. Treviño graduated summa cum laude from Seattle...


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The best thing that we can do is to plan for the communication and for the organization of mitigating things done like that and just continue to work with everyone.

One of the things that I think is outstanding is the ability of the federal agencies to have precluded possible strikes. When I read about some of the things that haven't happened because of the diligence, whether it's the FBI or other agencies, it's better not to have to deal with it. It's kind of like fire prevention.

Clearly, the fire department isn't going to do any counter terrorism or terrorism prevention, because that's a federal area, but we really appreciate the fact that they're out there doing that and we want to work with them as much as we can.

Firehouse: Very good. Terrific.

Treviño: The University of Nevada/Las Vegas did a survey of all the services provided in the community, they polled to find out what people felt was the most important service that can be provided. And they also polled to find out with which service they are most satisfied, and in each case, fire protection came out number two out of I think 26 categories.

We have the second-highest satisfaction rate, which doesn't maybe sound as good as being the highest, but when you consider that entertainment was considered the number-one satisfaction rate, and in an area like Las Vegas I think that should be expected.

Fire protection was given the second-highest rating in terms of need, right after safe and secure neighborhoods. I think everyone would agree that safety is always going to be paramount, but that's indicative of a really healthy program, a healthy system and open communications.