Basic Firefighting: Forcible Entry

A basic understanding of forcible entry tools and techniques by applying the material in a practical setting. Session Reference: Topic: Basic Firefighting: Forcible Entry Level of Instruction: 1 Time Required: 3 Hours...


A basic understanding of forcible entry tools and techniques by applying the material in a practical setting.

Session Reference:

Topic: Basic Firefighting: Forcible Entry

Level of Instruction: 1

Time Required: 3 Hours

Materials:

• Acquired structure or forcible entry props

• Various hand and power tools

References:

• Truck Company Fireground Operations, Second Edition, Chapters 6 and 7

• Essentials of Fire Fighting, Fourth Edition, IFSTA, Chapters 6 and 8

Preparation

Motivation:

Objective (SPO): The student will demonstrate a basic understanding of forcible entry tools and techniques by applying the material in a practical setting.

Overview: Basic Firefighting: Forcible Entry

• Tools

• Hoisting tools

• Forcible entry through doors

• Forcible entry through windows

• Forcible entry through doors and windows practical

Basic Firefighting: Forcible Entry

SPO 1-1 The student will demonstrate a basic understanding of forcible entry tools and techniques by applying the material in a practical setting.

EO 1-1 Describe the general categories of tools used in forcible entry.

EO 1-2 Demonstrate the hoisting of selected hand tools using generally-accepted knots and practices.

EO 1-3 Demonstrate the proper use of various hand and power tools to force entry through various wood and metal doors (NFPA 1001 (1997) 3-3.3).

EO 1-4 Demonstrate the proper use of various hand and power tools to force entry through various windows (NFPA 1001 (1997) 3-3.3).

EO 1-5 Demonstrate the proper use of various hand and power tools to force entry through various doors and windows (NFPA 1001 (1997) 3-3.3).

Instructional Guide

I. Tools (1-1)

A. Forcible Entry Implies Speed

NOTE: Instructor should stress the concept of “try before you pry”

1. Forcible entry operations should be carried out quickly as possible

2. Forcible entry should create as little damage as possible

3. Both speed and minimal damage are achieved through proficiency with tools

4. Personal safety must be emphasized

B. Cutting Tools

1. Tools most often used are axes, bolt cutters, power saws, and air and hydraulic cutters

2. Chisel end of halligan or kelly bar can be used for cutting

C. Prying and Forcing Tools

1. Tools are halligan tool, claw tool, kelly too, pry axe, hux bar, and similar devices

2. Flathead axe often used

3. For heavy work, maul or hammerhead pick can be used

4. Hydraulic- and air-powered tools available in various sizes and types

5. Power tools should be used where heavy or barred doors common

6. Battering ram effective for breaking through heavy doors and walls

D. Lock Pullers

1. Designed to remove cylinder locks

2. Driven onto locked cylinder and then pulled with halligan or similar tool

 

II. Hoisting Hand Tools (1-2)

A. Review the basic knots covered in Firefighter I, i.e.,bowline, clove hitch, figure eight on a bight, and figure eight reweave.

B. Review the used of basic knots to tie an axe, pike pole, halligan bar, ground ladder, and smoke ejector for hoisting using a portion of the hoisting rope as a tag line.

C. Have students demonstrate use of knots by hoisting selected tools and equipment from a height of at least 20 feet.

III. Forcible Entry Through Doors (1-3)

A. Commercial Occupancies: Front

1. Almost easier to force entry through front door than rear

a. In older buildings, front door might be constructed of wood or wood frame with ordinary glass

b. In modern structures, front door made of tempered glass or heavy plate glass in strong frame

c. Rear doors usually made of steel or reinforced with steel

d. Front door protected by metal shutters, accordion-type barred grating, or similar devices

2. Tempered-glass doors

a. For all practical purposes tempered glass cannot be broken

b. Attack at lock or find some other means of entry

c. Locks usually cylinder type located at middle or both of door

d. Double tempered door locks located in middle

e. Use lock puller to remove lock

f. If lock puller not available, drive chisel end of pry bar between lock and frame or between two sections to force open

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