University of Extrication: Introduction and Orientation

The University of Extrication series covers three basic aspects of vehicle rescue training; vehicle "New Technology," extrication tool and equipment review, and practical skills evolutions.Subject:  Univeristy of Extrication (U/E) seriresTopic...


The University of Extrication series covers three basic aspects of vehicle rescue training; vehicle "New Technology," extrication tool and equipment review, and practical skills evolutions. Subject:   Univeristy of Extrication (U/E) serires Topic:   Introduction and orientation to series...


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The University of Extrication series covers three basic aspects of vehicle rescue training; vehicle "New Technology," extrication tool and equipment review, and practical skills evolutions.

Subject:  Univeristy of Extrication (U/E) serires

Topic:  Introduction and orientation to series

Objective:  Understand scope of series

Task:  Organize three-ring binder to compile training series (from print edition)

New Technology information includes important updates on modern vehicle construction features, a look at new vehicle equipment and occupant safety features such as airbag restraint systems. The design, operating characteristics, and influence the new technology item has on modern-day vehicle rescue and extrication practices and procedures is explained.

Extrication tool and equipment review includes analysis of the newest and most innovative vehicle rescue tools and equipment currently available to rescue personnel. Get the inside scoop on what's hot and what's not before you invest for your department.

To keep current with the newest rescue techniques to use at accident scenes, practical skills evolution training will be featured. Many rescuers continue to perform older less efficient techniques. To improve vehicle rescue operations, detailed step-by-step procedures on new evolutions are presented in this University of Extrication series. This skills training allows rescue personnel the opportunity to improve their rescue scene efficiency and safety.

Each University of Extrication training lesson is presented in a convenient notebook page format for the convenience of department training officers. Each page is marked with a large index letter for ease of filing. A standard heading at the top of each front page serves as a quick reference guide to the content of that lesson. This series is designed for easy indexing by the department Training Officer in a three-ring binder.

The Desired Learning Outcome for participants in this series is:

1. Have a working knowledge if the various designs, locations, functions and safety hazards presented by "new technology" items;

2. Review new extrication tools and equipment applicable for incorporating into the department's rescue inventory;

3. Understand new practical skills techniques that can improve the department's rescue scene efficiency and personnel safety.

Task: Organize three-ring binder to compile training series.

Airbag Restraint System
During what has become the most widely known vehicle extrication incident of modern day, two Dayton, OH, firefighters were injured when the dual airbags on a 1994 Mitsubishi Galant automobile they were working on deployed. Both firefighters, Tom Trimbach and Jim Kohler, were struck by the airbags with Trimbach being literally thrown through the air by the inflation force of the bag. Lessons learned from this August 1995 response reinforce the need for fire and rescue personnel to shut down the electrical system of any vehicle they perform extrication operations on at an accident scene and to "safety" the electrical cables and contact points.

District Chief Jim Beach, incident commander in Dayton, commented, "We were aware that the electrical system (of the Mitsubishi) was intact. We didn't feel at the time that it was necessary to disconnect the electrical system. Our prime concern was the possible hazard of fire. We weren't looking for airbags at that time."

In situations such as Dayton, where rescuers have people trapped and encounter a 'loaded' air bag system that has not deployed, action must be quickly taken to control the vehicle's electrical system. Here is a quick checklist for 'loaded' air bag system management at an accident scene:

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