Firehouse Heroism and Community Service Awards: Community Service Awards

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Special Recognition

Captain Rachel Davino

Captain Dawn Hochsprung

Captain Anne Marie Murphy

Captain Lauren Rousseau

Captain Mary Sherlach

Captain Victoria Soto

Sandy Hook Elementary School

Lewis County Fire District 15, Winlock, WA

The entire country watched in horror on Dec. 14, 2012, as Newtown, CT, suffered an unimaginable tragedy: a gunman stormed Sandy Hook Elementary School, killing six administrators and 20 children. As details emerged, it became evident the educators at Sandy Hook had performed heroic acts, yet they were not eligible for a Medal of Honor because they were not military officers. Members of Lewis County Fire District 15 in Winlock, WA, a community similar in layout to Newtown, thought if the educators were first responders, they would have received (posthumously) the Fire Service Medal of Honor.

Thus began the department's movement to honor the sacrifice of the Sandy Hook staff. At its Jan. 8, 2013, meeting, a motion was made to pass two resolutions. The first was to recognize the six as honorary firefighters/first responders. The second resolution promoted each to the highest line officer rank in their department (Captain) and awarded each the Fire Service Medal of Honor. Both resolutions were unanimously passed by Board of Commissioners.

Firehouse® Magazine received nominations only for the six honorary first responders, who clearly deserve Heroism awards. But the Lewis County Fire District's dedication to community and commitment to the bond between public service employees earned them our top Community Service Award as well.

 

Battalion Chief Doug McAdory

Tuscaloosa Fire & Rescue Service

Four years ago, as captain of Station 2, McAdory began a partnership with the children in the Arts ‘n Autism after-school program, treating more than 20 families to a Fire & Safety Open House. This program has grown to include fundraisers and interactions throughout the year, including swimming lessons with the dive team and Halloween trick-or-treating from a fire truck. McAdory is honored for forging a community relationship and helping prepare personnel for emergency response to its special-needs population.

 

Lieutenant Frank J. Brim

Chicago, IL, FD

As program coordinator for the Chicago Police and Firefighter Training Academy (CPFTA), Brim helps high school juniors and seniors to see, learn and experience what a public safety career is all about. About 250 cadets are trained each year, with seniors having the opportunity to take the EMT course; more than 20 cadets earn state certification as EMTs each year. Successful graduates also receive a scholarship to any of the city’s seven colleges. 

 

Lieutenant Josh Portie

Austin, TX, FD

For his work in educating the public on wildfire safety and awareness, Portie is commended in providing key leadership to motivate communities to take forward the message in becoming Firewise. As a result of Portie’s efforts, AFD embarked on a door-hanger program and held community engagement meetings which led to a lighter fire loss in those areas.

 

Battalion Chief John Bradle

Paterson, NJ, FD

During Hurricane Sandy, firefighters were focused on tending to the community and its devastation, leaving little time to tend to their own loss. Chief Bradle mobilized a fully volunteer effort for the dozens of first responders and their families who had suffered during the disaster. While still maintaining duties and responsibilities on the job, Bradle and his team performed selfless acts of compassion and commitment to fellow members off duty for many weeks after the storm.

 

Charles Tobias Jr.

Paul Garnier

Richard McClung

Fresno, CA, FD

The Firefighters Creating Memories Community Outreach Program delivers a unique service to children with disabilities during The Big Fresno Fair. The program partners firefighters with mentally and physically challenged children who were not otherwise able to enjoy the fair and its rides due to inaccessibility. The firefighters solicited funding and developed a budget so no financial impact was incurred. They attend to the needs and enjoyment of each special participant and family, including allowing parents to spend time with their other children. 

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