For the Record 8/13

Nonresidential Building Fires (2009-2011) Last month we presented the findings of the U.S. Fire Administration (USFA) report on Residential Building Fires (2009-2011). Here are some interesting facts from the Nonresidential Building Fires (2009-2011...


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Nonresidential Building Fires (2009-2011)

Last month we presented the findings of the U.S. Fire Administration (USFA) report on Residential Building Fires (2009-2011). Here are some interesting facts from the Nonresidential Building Fires (2009-2011) report.

  • An estimated 86,500 nonresidential building fires were reported to United States fire departments each year and caused an estimated 85 deaths, 1,325 injuries, and $2.6 billion in property losses per year.
  • Cooking was the leading cause of all nonresidential building fires (29 percent). Nearly all nonresidential building cooking fires were small, confined fires (97 percent).
  • Outside and special properties accounted for the most nonresidential building fires (21 percent), while storage buildings accounted for the most nonresidential building fire deaths (29 percent).
  • Nonresidential building fires occurred most frequently from 3 pm to 6 pm.
  • Nonconfined nonresidential building fires most often started in vehicle storage areas (9 percent).
  • Fifty-six percent of nonconfined nonresidential building fires extended beyond the room of origin. The leading causes of these larger fires were unintentional or careless actions (19 percent), intentional actions (13 percent) and electrical malfunctions (12 percent).
  • Misuse of material or product (32 percent) was the leading factors contributing to ignition category in nonconfined nonresidential building fires.
  • Smoke alarms were not present in 52 percent of the larger, nonconfined fires in occupied nonresidential buildings.

A PDF of this report can be found at http://www.usfa.fema.gov/downloads/pdf/statistics/v14i5.pdf.

 

Help the Survivors of the Fallen Firefighters from Arizona

The families, friends and colleagues of the 19 firefighters who died in Arizona on June 30 will need assistance for years to come. This is the mission of the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation (NFFF).

Please help them in their efforts to support the survivors of these fallen heroes. NFFF, in cooperation with local support efforts in Arizona, has set up a national fund to accept monetary donations to assist the survivors and coworkers of the firefighters who were killed.

All donated funds will be used to help the survivors and coworkers as they begin to rebuild their lives and support the programs and services they will need.

"This tragedy has shaken a community and saddened our nation. We want the survivors and coworkers of those firefighters to know that the entire fire service family is thinking of them at this time. We also want to reassure them that the foundation will be at their side ready to offer our support," said Chief Ronald Siarnicki, executive director of the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation.

 

To Donate to the Yarnell Hill Fallen Firefighters Fund:

Send checks to:
National Fallen Firefighters Foundation
c/o Yarnell Hill Fallen Firefighters Fund
P.O. Drawer 498
Emmitsburg, MD 21727
or
Donate Online:
www.regonline.com/yarnellhill