For the Record 10-13

College Campus Fire Safety Each year college and university students, on- and off-campus, experience hundreds of fire-related emergencies nationwide. There are several specific causes for fires on college campuses, including cooking, intentionally set...


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College Campus Fire Safety

Each year college and university students, on- and off-campus, experience hundreds of fire-related emergencies nationwide. There are several specific causes for fires on college campuses, including cooking, intentionally set fires, overloaded power strips and open flame. Overall, most college-related fires are due to a general lack of knowledge about fire safety and prevention.

For most students, the last fire safety training they received was in grade school, but with new independence comes new responsibilities. It is important that both off-campus and on-campus students understand fire risks and know the preventative measures that could save their lives.

Safety Tips for Students:

Candles

  • Make sure candles are in sturdy holders and put out after each use.
  • Never leave a burning candle unattended.
  • Keep candles away from draperies and linens.
  • Use flameless candles, which are both safe and attractive.

Cooking

  • Cook only where it is permitted.
  • Keep your cooking area clean and uncluttered.
  • Never leave cooking unattended.
  • If a fire starts in a microwave, keep the door closed and unplug the unit.

Smoking

  • Make sure cigarettes and ashes are out. Never toss hot cigarette butts or ashes in the trash can.
  • Use deep, wide ashtrays. Place ashtrays on something sturdy and hard to ignite.
  • After a party, check for cigarette butts, especially under cushions. Chairs and sofas catch on fire fast and burn fast.
  • It is risky to smoke when you have been drinking or are drowsy.

Escape Planning

  • Get low and go under the smoke to escape to your safe exit.
  • Feel the door. If it's hot, use your second way out.
  • Use the stairs; never use an elevator during a fire.
  • Practice your escape plan. Always have two ways out.

 

 

LeDuc, Jones Receive Honors

Todd J. LeDuc, CFO, was honored by receiving the Ambassador of the Year Award during the Center for Public Safety Excellence’s 14th annual awards ceremony held during Fire-Rescue International in Chicago, Illinois.

The CPSE Ambassador of the Year Award recognizes an individual whose dedication and advocacy for the Center for Public Safety Excellence (CPSE) and its programs contribute directly to the success of the organization and the advancement of its mission throughout the international fire and emergency services industry.  As a result of Chief LeDuc’s efforts as a CPSE Ambassador, the leaders and agencies serving our communities are better prepared, and their communities are safer places. 

LeDuc, a Division Chief and 24-year veteran of Broward County (FL) Sheriff Fire Rescue, Rescue was also honored with the Garry Briese IAFC Safety Performance Award, which is presented annually to an IAFC Safety, Health and Survival (SHS) section member who has demonstrated a personal commitment to and achievement in the area of health and safety. As division chief of safety and wellness for the department, Chief LeDuc is responsible for the research, development and implementation of numerous health and safety initiatives and programs department-wide. Some of the highlights include successful grant applications to replace firefighter PPE and SCBA, a SAFER grant to restore 27 firefighter positions for safe staffing, and a UASI grant to add 30-plus NFA-certified safety officers to the department.
Chief Cliff Jones, CFO, was honored by receiving the Ray Picard Award. This award is aptly named after its first recipient and one of the founding fathers of fire and emergency service accreditation, Chief Ray Picard, who retired as fire chief of Huntington Beach, CA. Recipients are selected annually from a pool of nominations. The Award recognizes individual superior leadership and outstanding contribution to CFAI and to fire and emergency service accreditation.

Chief Jones is a 39-year veteran of the fire service, serving 22 of those years as fire chief in Tucson, AZ. He holds a Master’s degree in Public Administration and Bachelors in Political Science and is a tireless supporter of the accreditation process. His department was the alpha-test site for the National Fire Service Accreditation Project and became the first of five beta test departments to become accredited in 1997 through the Commission on Fire Accreditation International.

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