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Extreme Run to Benefit Fallen Heroes On May 17 and 18, runners from around the country will gather in Santa Barbara, CA, to take part in the American Hotshots Extreme Run, a 10+ mile obstacle course in the heart of California’s Wine Country. The...


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Extreme Run to Benefit Fallen Heroes

On May 17 and 18, runners from around the country will gather in Santa Barbara, CA, to take part in the American Hotshots Extreme Run, a 10+ mile obstacle course in the heart of California’s Wine Country. The event will include live bands, fine food from area restaurants and beverages from the wineries and beer sponsors. Best of all, 100% of the proceeds will be donated to the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation and the Wildland Firefighter Foundation. To register for the run, or to donate to the cause, please visit www.hotshotextreme.com.

 

Nevada Fire Fighters Support Red Cross

On January 23, at the Henderson Fire Training Center in Henderson, NV, the Professional Fire Fighters of Nevada (PFFN) made a financial contribution of $20,000 to the American Red Cross “Fire Hurts. Red Cross Helps.” campaign, which provides assistance to victims who have been displaced from their homes due to fires throughout Nevada.

“It is an honor to be part of such an impactful campaign, and we hope to provide the best assistance possible to those whose lives have been disrupted by house fires,” said Rusty McAllister, president of the PFFN. “Though we are grateful to be able to donate $20,000 to this worthy cause, we are reaching out to the community to help us meet the financial goal and create awareness on fire safety.”

The campaign is a joint effort by the American Red Cross and PFFN, with the goal of raising $350,000 to fund emergency assistance to local families. On the average, the Southern Nevada Chapter of the American Red Cross responds to a residential fire every 18 hours. 

 

Newark Firefighters Receive Surface Ice Rescue Training

The Newark Fire Department Special Operations Division conducted intensive surface ice rescue training in late February. Based on work schedules and assignments, Newark fire companies rotated through the training, in which they simulated the rescue of persons who have fallen through ice, using dummies and rescue gear.

Funding for the drill equipment came from a $91,000 federal Port Security grant. Firefighter One LLC Inc., an emergency training company, conducted the classes. Companies chosen for the drills were those who were identified as being likely first responders to an ice rescue incident, due to their proximity to parks and waterways in the City of Newark.

“The Newark Fire Department is most effective when its members are constantly trained and prepared for the incidents we have to respond to,” said Fire Chief John G. Centanni. “The training we did was realistic, hands-on, and comprehensive.”

The training put rotated firefighters through various positions in rescue scenarios, with them playing victims floating in the water and rescuers alike. Using rubber rafts, tethers, cables, ropes and teamwork, the firefighters pulled the “victims” out of the water, under close supervision, to ensure safety.

All the firefighters who completed the training received certificates certifying them as “ice surface rescuers.”

 

Houston Fire Station to Receive City’s First “Green” HVAC

When construction plans for Fire Station 84 were announced, they included: five drive-thru bays; maintenance and EMT areas; fueling island; living quarters with kitchen, lounge, exercise area, locker rooms and bathrooms; and a GeoExchange heating, ventilation and air conditioning unit (HVAC). Wait, a what?

A GeoExchange HVAC features GeoExchange technology, which uses a series of sealed piping loops buried in the ground to tap the renewable energy of the earth. In the winter, heat that accumulates in the soil is absorbed by a system of pipes buried within the earth and then used to provide heating to a building. In the summer, the process is reversed – excess heat from the building is collected and transferred to the earth.

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