Are You Prepared for Fast Spreading Fires?

A large fast-spreading fire is something that does not happen every day, and it is likely that most firefighters will encounter only one or two in their entire careers.


Once the fire is knocked down, you can go in and mop up if the structures are safe, but you may have to leave the interior attacks on the back burner until the fire’s spread is controlled.

Officers should take a step or two away from the nozzle to see if the stream is actually reaching anything.  Water arcing over the edge of a roof and falling into the back yard or a stream not washing the side of an exposure accomplishes nothing to mitigate the fire.  Put the water where it will do the most good.

The use of single line attack monitors allows one person to safely control 500-GPM, and the monitor can be left in place flowing, if heat or flames are forcing firefighters to retreat. 

A large fast-spreading fire is something that does not happen every day, and it is likely that most firefighters will encounter only one or two in their entire careers. The problem lies in the fact that because we encounter fast-spreading fires so infrequently, there is a tendency to not have properly planned for them.  There is no excuse for that.