1. #1

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    Default Top Reasons to Use Certified Gear Cleaning Facilities

    A major necessity of any firefighter is ridding his/her gear of the accumulation of soot and grime infecting bunker gear. What most firefighters do not know is the rationale behind NFPAs newest set of standards. Obviously, gear needs to be cleaned because the more soot and grime that accumulates in the gear, the more difficult it is to remain visible in difficult circumstances.

    What is not known throughout the firefighting community are the Flashover Affects that can quickly develop within only a few minutes of the start of the fire. Accumulated soot and grime can easily ignite under these conditions putting firefighter at higher risk.

    It is for these two reasons for which I strongly recommend using a gear cleaning facility that is NFPA 1851 certified. These facilities use commercial grade washing machines that extract soot and grime that many non NFPA certified companies many not. Each facility as well as the processes and techniques practiced have to be certified by the NFPA.

    There are many NFPA 1851 Certified Bunker Gear Cleaning Facilities that I would like to recommend throughout the United States, the first being the company I do work with:

    1. www.911Clean.com
    2. www.TurnoutServices.com
    3. www.mecofire.com
    4. www.realcleangear.com
    5. www.totalfiregroup.com

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    *SPAM*
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    Nice first post!!

    If we want to look at advertisements.. we will get the magazine!!

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    Now I'll admit to being a bit old fashioned but if a room I'm in gets to the point of igniting the soot on my TO's,obviously somewhere I failed and it wasn't on cleaning the suit.Proper vent and hose work work very well to prevent this event from happening.AND,we have the proper machine and chemicals in house to care for our protective equipment.Along with the associated training to use it.While I have no doubt that the commercial companies do a fantastic job on gear,we don't have enough extra sets to make sending it out feasible.This includes the financial aspect as well.How many human torches did you see during the "war years"when we ACTUALLY had FIRES? Not many.So while the post has some relevance in terms of health issues,I remain unconvinced that a satisfactory job cannot be done with the proper equipment in house. T.C.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rescue101 View Post
    Now I'll admit to being a bit old fashioned but if a room I'm in gets to the point of igniting the soot on my TO's,obviously somewhere I failed and it wasn't on cleaning the suit.Proper vent and hose work work very well to prevent this event from happening.AND,we have the proper machine and chemicals in house to care for our protective equipment.Along with the associated training to use it.While I have no doubt that the commercial companies do a fantastic job on gear,we don't have enough extra sets to make sending it out feasible.This includes the financial aspect as well.How many human torches did you see during the "war years"when we ACTUALLY had FIRES? Not many.So while the post has some relevance in terms of health issues,I remain unconvinced that a satisfactory job cannot be done with the proper equipment in house. T.C.
    I concur with Tim on this. We have an extractiion machine here at HQ, and we replace 20% of our gear a year, so every 5 years the gear is being replaced totally. We do send it out for repair to take care of tears, etc.
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
    Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

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    We just got a washer/extractor/dryer combo as a coop with the state forest fire service.

    Now they have a place to clean their PPE (and so do we!).

    The machines are massive and I can't wait for that april fresh smelling turnout gear!

    Is business that bad, that you have to spam a message board?
    I am now a past chief and the views, opinions, and comments are mine and mine alone. I do not speak for any department or in any official capacity. Although, they would be smart to listen to me.

    "The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on the list."

    "When tempted to fight fire with fire, remember that the Fire Department usually uses water."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rescue101 View Post
    Now I'll admit to being a bit old fashioned but if a room I'm in gets to the point of igniting the soot on my TO's,obviously somewhere I failed and it wasn't on cleaning the suit.Proper vent and hose work work very well to prevent this event from happening.AND,we have the proper machine and chemicals in house to care for our protective equipment.Along with the associated training to use it.While I have no doubt that the commercial companies do a fantastic job on gear,we don't have enough extra sets to make sending it out feasible.This includes the financial aspect as well.How many human torches did you see during the "war years"when we ACTUALLY had FIRES? Not many.So while the post has some relevance in terms of health issues,I remain unconvinced that a satisfactory job cannot be done with the proper equipment in house. T.C.
    You are right about doing the job in house. Even the guy who runs Shamrock Gear and Repair, the company that repairs our gear, says that if you have the right equipment, to clean the gear before sending it to him for repair so we don't get billed for a cleaning too. The right equipment is a big thing though. One guy pressure washed his gear, then put it in a top loading washing machine. The gear was 3 weeks old and was ruined.

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    Default You guys make some good points

    Good point Rescue101, if your turnout gear does ignite, you did something wrong. But it does happen. Having your own stuff in house is great as I am sure it saves some money. But if your only reason for not going commercial is because you do not have extra suits, there are some cleaning comapnies out there that provide suits for free while your stuff is being cleaned.

    CaptainGonzo, why do you replace 20% of your gear each year???

    ChiefKN, that is a great idea doing a co-op to purcahse an extractor/washing machine. I would suggest using Check-6 Aerospace cleaning supplies, graet for turnout gear. Let me know if you need contact information.

    Firemedic319, I know, these machines can cost upwards of 60k for the top of the line stuff. But you can definately do a co-op like ChiefKN was saying to make it more affordable.

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    716,I think you lost the point.This business we're in I've done for a few years.In fact more years than some of the posters here have been on Earth,let alone the trade.Back in the "war years",we seldom washed gear.There wasn't time between runs to do it.None of my guys burned up then,nor have they since. Must be doing something RIGHT.Like Gonzo we set up to replace 20% of our gear yearly.With over 100 sets,that allows a little wiggle room for tight budgetary periods or a year when you tear up a lot of gear.It figures out to a rotation every five which is just about right for our active staff.We do and will continue to clean our gear in house,our local mfg rep(Bergeron)takes EXCELLENT care of any needed repairs.While we don't use any of the products you've mentioned there are a number of good ones.Most gear makers have lists of products they reccomend to clean their product,we use one from the Globe preferred list.If commercial cleaning is real important to you,there are a number of companies who can accomodate your needs and do a great job at it.We have very good results doing it in house and unless our runs go up drastically or it becomes economically infeasible to do it(both highly unlikely),it will stay as a required FD function. T.C.

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    CaptainGonzo, why do you replace 20% of your gear each year???
    It's in our budget.

    A firefighter gets a new set of gear every 5 years, his older gear gets washed repaired if necessary and goes into storage as a backup set.
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
    Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

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    What hapens to the turnouts at year 15? Donation to academy or sister city in Mexico?
    We send all ours to Mexico. They love them.







    This guy is still spamming!
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    I have a plan so cunning you could pin a tail on it and call it a weasel.
    All credit to Black Adder by Rowan Atkinson for the line.

    We get a big truck with lots of water and offer a "while you wear" cleaning service.

    Hose down is stage one, PPV is the dry off station at stage two. Starbucks voucher when you are done.

    Foam is extra.

    Think about it and let me know.
    Psychiatrists state 1 in 4 people has a mental illness.
    Look at three of your friends, if they are ok, your it.

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