Why register? ...To Enhance Your Experience
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 28
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    4

    Default Fired from a Department

    Whew...here goes. Its long, but its a good read (hell, its my story. I should know!):

    I love this profession with every fiber of my being. I have also been very fortunate in my pursuit in making it my occupation. I got a temp paid position when I was 19, and at 22 got a full time position with a very well respected Dept in my Region. I was also terminated from there during probation. I had 23 minutes left on my last shift of probation. The road since then has been rocky to say the least.

    For a good period, I was very socially introverted after this, and shut out many of my close friends, who are also in the fire service. Partly because of embarassment, partly because of shame that I could allow this to happen to myself. I was on unemployment for approx 7 mo.s, during which I sulked, hated, questioned and doubted everything pertaining to what happened, including my interest in the job anymore. Then, I got hired with my States Dept of Corrections. It has opened alot of doors for me, and has reinforced my love for the Fire Service. Its also given me the opportunity to pick myself off the floor, start paying bills and begin building some self-respect again.

    Since I got canned, I have actively tested, sometimes with my heart 110% into the respective Dept.'s process, others just going through the motions. I have an interview coming up on the 15th with a great Dept that is picking up several and am starting to let doubt creep back into my mind (its a very cyclitic thing, sometimes I am very confident in what I bring to the table...other times not). I dont want to spoil this great opportunity.

    The tough part of all this, is I have no tangible reason why it happened. I had a good Academy experience, but to be honest once I hit the floor with my assigned Company it was a different story. I had the personal stance of refusing to "play the game." I was a good probie. Dishes, coffee, house chores, rigs, newspaper, no dayroom, nose in the books.

    But my company didn't want that. They regard EMS highly, and I did (and honestly, dont that much) not. I wasn't able to shift gears and 'play the game' for the first 6 months. This put my crew in an awkward position, and they openly admitted they did everything they could to get me fired in that time frame. Something happened 1/2 way through, and my Company and I all got on the same side of the table. We actually started bonding and having a great shift together. Prior to this, there were mornings I hated coming to work. HATED. I also made a 2 hour (traffic) commute, which at first was absolutely worth it, but became dreadful. At the end, they even helped me plan my proposal to my now fiance! Great atmosphere, my evaluations went from constantly average-to-needing improvement to all average-above average, with great encouragment.

    When I got canned, my company was just as suprised as I was (and my LT and senior man dont hold their tongues and freely speak their mind..so they would of told me had they known). I was never given an official answer as to why, despite actively pursuing through emails, voicemails, etc. It makes it very difficult in interviews when asked "What happened" and I say "I dont know, but..." then go into my whole 5 minute schpeal.

    It hasn't quite been a year since all of this, but is fast approaching and I still get in my own way, and still find it very hard to accept and let go. I lost my financial stability, currently fighting a foreclosure and most importantly, lost my career (our identities are so bound up in that -- it's still what gives you a sense of value in the world).

    Any advice? Experience?


  2. #2
    MembersZone Subscriber docflip4884's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    League City, TX
    Posts
    52

    Default

    I like to shoot straight from the hip.

    Usually with rookies it's the other way around they start out great "playing the game" and end up lazy, comfortable, and sometimes negative. Sounds like your problem is that you were waaaaay to confident. You may have played house okay, but on calls did your "hate" for EMS or running a call shine through? Did you work OT w/ other shifts, with that attitude? I know that most departments check across the board for a general census with all officers, and ask of a persons knowledge, attitude, ethic (moral and work), and general fit for a department.

    For the record, in no way did you have the right to "hate" your job, you didn't earn that right, not with anything less than 3-5 years on a job. And certainly not with at least 10 other people willing to replace you, waiting to be hired. Granted you "turned" yourself around, but when damage is done its usually done, especially in your first year. I should know when I was hired me and another Paramedic were hired, we had the "know it all" attitude. Within a month I was told to sit down shut up. I did, he didn't after about 6 months he changed but guess what? Damage is already done!

    Your recourse is to get letters of character from guys you worked with, officers especially. If you were as tight as you say, shouldn't be a problem. Also try your Training officer, or anyone from your Academy. During interviews simply explain that you and your respective department decided it best for you to leave, and that you had some minor difficulties adjusting in the fire service, assure that you've got the right idea now. Don't bad mouth a department, and certainly don't bad mouth other guys on the job.

    Keep in mind, it's a slippery slope describing why you were let go from a job, especially in this business. However, if guys with any kind of stroke (veterans) are telling you that you shouldn't be doing this job and they reccomended you to be dismissed, you might want to listen...they could be doing you a favor in the long run.
    Doc Flip

    Engine 33 West Side

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    4

    Default

    What does he mean by... "iI refused to play the game"? What does that mean?

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Why didn't your department want you studying your books? I don't get it.

  5. #5
    Forum Member Surtur's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Edgerton, Wisconsin
    Posts
    74

    Default

    It sounds as if all of your problems stem from the fact that don't enjoy doing EMS at all. If you still look to pre-hospital care as a game firefighters have to play, then you've chosen the wrong profession to pursue in my opinion. Professional firefighters respond to more calls where they provide medical care than ones where they just put out fires. EMS is what makes it possible for there to be as many paid positions as there are for firefighters today. Even if you were able to go through the motions when providing patient care after six months on the job, that doesn't make you the right person for that position. I sure as hell wouldn't want a firefighter who's just going through the motions when caring for me or my family. Also, the department that fired you may have realized that you were only trying to do a good job with EMS to get through your probationary period and that afterwards, you would likely become a resentful & sloppy EMT. Compassion is a very highly valued character trait in the fire service, and providing care for another human being is one of clearest ways to display that. Things probably haven't worked out for you as a professional firefighter for a reason. If you truly love fighting fires and doing things like vehicle extrication, then find a volunteer fire department to join where providing pre-hospital care is not their primary role, otherwise, I would stick with the department of corrections if I were you.

  6. #6
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    122

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by breakingstuff View Post
    They regard EMS highly, and I did (and honestly, dont that much) not.
    Just remember - 80%

  7. #7
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    1,047

    Default

    Here is the question ANY department will have before they hire you.
    If we hire you, what will be different?

    In other words, itís hard enough to land a job. Itís twice as hard to land a job with such a huge blemish on your record.

    What you are saying is that I have no reason why I was let go. Every department will interpret this as TROUBLE. Itís not my fault, I was the victim. Please give me another chanceÖÖ

    You have stated that your new crew was into EMS. You did not perform. What have you done to strengthen your EMS skills?

    You can take all of the tests under the sun. No department wants to hire another departmentís problem. By stating that your former crew made an issue out of your termination, you have now become a problem.

    Deep down you know why you were terminated. Itís in your evaluations. I suspect they told you (weak in EMS), but you didnít listen. Your approach had better be that it was your responsibility to perform and you didnít. If given another opportunity I will perform.

    Itís OK to fail. Itís not OK to deny responsibility. Everyone has failed (myself included). Itís how you handle the failure that defines you. You need to take a long hard look in the mirror.

    Paul Lepore
    Battalion Chief
    www.aspiringfirefighters.com
    Last edited by BCLepore; 07-13-2008 at 10:07 PM.
    Paul Lepore
    Battalion Chief
    www.aspiringfirefighters.com

  8. #8
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    2,466

    Default You Got Fired from a Department

    One of the most difficult hurdles to get over is being fired by another department. It's easier if you're a medic. But since you donít enjoy the EMS side that option is not available to you.

    The main thing to remember is don't bring up getting fired in the oral board unless they do. Too many candidates want to bring it up on their own trying to justify their position and try to do repair work. Big error. You will only be opening a can of worms than can't be closed.

    If it is brought up or covered in your background, take responsibility for what you think happened (you may never really find out why) what you learned, and how it has helped you move forward in your career.

    Even though past co-workers offered to give you personal testimonies they often evaporate when you request them.

    "Captain Bob" www.eatstress.com

  9. #9
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    1,047

    Default

    The oral board WILL ALWAYS KNOW ABOUT IT. It's on your application (remember you need to account for the year you were employed). We ALWAYS have a copy of your application.

    Not bringing it up will guarantee you will not be taken seriously.

    Your best chance is to explain what happened and what you learned from it. Most importantly, as I mentioned in my previous post, what will be different if WE hire you.

    I have said it a dozen times on this board - Intentionally with holding information is the same as lying. This will certainly seal your fate.
    Last edited by BCLepore; 07-14-2008 at 09:52 AM.
    Paul Lepore
    Battalion Chief
    www.aspiringfirefighters.com

  10. #10
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Jul 1999
    Location
    Flanders, NJ
    Posts
    13,537

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CaptBob View Post
    One of the most difficult hurdles to get over is being fired by another department. It's easier if you're a medic. But since you donít enjoy the EMS side that option is not available to you.

    The main thing to remember is don't bring up getting fired in the oral board unless they do. Too many candidates want to bring it up on their own trying to justify their position and try to do repair work. Big error. You will only be opening a can of worms than can't be closed.

    If it is brought up or covered in your background, take responsibility for what you think happened (you may never really find out why) what you learned, and how it has helped you move forward in your career.

    Even though past co-workers offered to give you personal testimonies they often evaporate when you request them.

    "Captain Bob" www.eatstress.com
    Here ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls, is another perfect example of why you should NEVER EVER EVER take advice from cap'n bobby. He advocates that you lie and conceal information in an attempt to get the job. After, nothing counts until you get the badge, nothing, or whatever line of crap he is selling today.

    Let's say for a moment that there is one slim, very slim chance that this guy is going to be offered a job. The background check turns up that you got fired from your last FD job and you concealed it. That slim chance becomes NO chance in the blink of an eye. Remember, you want them to believe that you have grown from the episode and that you are a different person. And the first chance you get you lie. Great start.

    As I have said a hundred times here, any investigator with half a brain and an ounce of ambition can and will turn up information like this. It's so easy I can't even imagine anyone would suggest otherwise.

    Do not lie. Do not conceal information. TELL THE TRUTH. As Paul said, you have to convince the board that you have grown from the episode and that, as a result, you are now a better candidate than you were before. Part of that metamorphosis is accepting whatever responsibility for the episode is yours and be honest and open. That is your one and only shot at this job.
    PROUD, HONORED AND HUMBLED RECIPIENT OF THE PURPLE HYDRANT AWARD - 10/2007.

  11. #11
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Orlando, FL
    Posts
    279

    Default

    Question: where you actually fired, or "asked to resign"???? BIG difference.....Same outcome yes, but one DEFINETLY looks better than the other..

  12. #12
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    96

    Default

    I'm sorry, I may be too new in the Fire Service (2 yrs) to understand this, but what is "Playing the Game"? Is this referring to the Medical game? I thought the old firemen who thought medical calls were not part of the department's responsibility were long gone. I mean over 80% of the calls we get are EMS. It's not a game at all . . . it's an absolutely crucial part of the job. If you were asked to resign because you hated EMS then I'm with the department that let you go. Hopefully now that you are back to getting on with a department, you have a different outlook when it comes to Medical Aids. If so, this should be stressed in your interview when it comes up. Good luck either way.

  13. #13

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Thanks for all of the replies...now, understanding I came on a internationally-read forum soliciting advice, I need to address some 'loose ends' I left.

    1. I am not a bad EMT. I am just not passionate about it. I will never be complacent, negligent on unfit to deliver care. I am just not passionate about it. There are the truckies, the rope-a-dopes, the enginemen, and medics who all have their niche' in the fire service, preferring one course of the craft vs. another. I prefer everything but the EMS. But again, that will not influence my ability to deliver care, leave a scene and patient better than found, DTRT and above all know my protocols and when things are out of my realm of care.

    2. My company is very passionate about EMS. I am very passionate about the fire floor. My company said, and I quote "take the engine away, we could care less. Touch our aid unit [amb] and we will have some issues". This is not my mindset, and it was difficult for me to relate or even adjust to having that mindset molding me and my foundational knowledge for the rest of my career.

    3. 'playing the game'. As I just noted, it was hard for me to be open-minded about who was showing me the ropes and getting my career off in the true course when they themselves were so narrowed into something. I appreciate the passion, I admire and respect it. But it took a lot of time and effort to opening up to such a staunch view on the job. It spilled over to all other aspects and the house had a negative or pessimistic environment. During life in general, I choose to avoid people like that because they **** me off. Now I was assigned and directly under these very personality traits. I just couldn't 'play the game' and ignore the environment/culture and roll up my sleeves to make it happen. It brought me down.

    4. Which goes into the right to hate going to work. Doc, I am very appreciate of what you wrote, it made alot of good sense. But Im not understanding what you mean by not having the right to hate the job so early on. Everyone deserves the right to enjoy their job, thats why so many guys pursue this one. While it took alittle bit for me, that 'hate' became the fuel to not only succeed, but to improve my companys attitude about fire floor training, talking shop -- building construction, fire attack, fire behavior-- all that good stuff. Once they saw they had this guy who was lapping up everything they threw, just dying to bend their ear about all their time on the job, they started falling in love with it again and wanting to share their knowledge.

    5. No, I was not given the option to resign.

    6. I will never hide this part of my past, as it has been such a large part of my adult life, and am not ashamed of how and what Ive learned from it.

    Im simply looking for anybody with that skeleton in their closet, and/or some solid advice to help me package this up. Thanks again for all your guys replies.

  14. #14
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Bouncin between the rust belts mitten and Charm City on the Chesapeake
    Posts
    91

    Default

    I do not consider myself a person who has been in the fire service that long at all. I am going on 3 years, (2 of which were paid on call volly, and almost a year full time). I guess I just have a huge question that nobody has brought up yet.

    Why, knowing that you are not passionate about EMS & medical runs, did you apply for a fulltime firefighter/EMT-Basic position on this department if you knew that EMS & prehospital patient care was their main emphasis and passion?

    As a guy in the same shoes as thousands, possibly millions of others out there who has been bustin his balls to do whatever it takes to get a fulltime firefighting job, there are a couple things that I have found in job hunting/testing/interviewing, etc.

    One of the main things I do, before I even turn in an application somewhere, is sit down for a couple hours and do all I can to find out whatever I can about that department and the surronding area. I look at things like the area where the department is, the weather, the economic situation and how progressive the town/city/municipality is. I also check out their website if I can if they have one and LOOK AT EVERYTHING on it. If I can't find everything I usually am looking for there...(I have a list of things I look for)....., then I'll try and call up the department and try and speak with someone who works there to find out more information about the department. Things like how into Haz-Mat, confined space, trench rescue, auto extrication, rope rescue and all the other faccets of the firefighting trade that there are nowadays. I also ask what percentage of their calls are medicals. After I do all of this, if the department is somewhat close to me within driving distance and if I've never been there, I'll try and take a road trip to get a feel for the area and while I am there, try and visit the fire department and maybe meet some of their members and possibly some officers. If the town is kind of far away from where I live, sometimes I'd even try and stay there overnite witha buddy or at a hotel or something and check out the nightlife. For a while, before I met the girl I'm dating now, I'd even try and get an eye for the single women in the area if at all possible. It might sound ridiculous, but if I'm planning on moving somewhere for a job, ya gotta think about these things.

    This way, I don't end up bustin my *** to get a job somewhere only to find out that it isn't at all what I'd like in a department. For me for instance, there are a couple things that are a big caution sign that usually deter me from wanting to work somewhere. I know that if I hear that a department isn't somewhat close to the ocean or the great lakes, I'm not really interested, because a lot of my hobbies and whatnot involve the water. If the area around the department doesn't have a decent four wheeling/ off road community with some good trails within a couple hours drive, I'm not interested. If the area is going down the tubes economically, that's a big caution sign. If the department is in podunk middle of nowhere with nothing that is close for miles or hours, whichever comes first, I'm not really interested.

    Of course there are exceptions......

    If the department is in a ****hole town which, economically is going down the tubes...BUT...has an old school traditional fire department that gets a lot of actual working fires, you can bet yur *** I'll be first in line with my application filled out and a resume' in hand when they're hiring.

    If I met a woman who wanted/needed to relocate somewhere for her job or whatnot, and if I could tolerate the area she wanted to move to, I'd do it

    If the department is small and sort of rural, but is overall a good department with lots of options for outdoor sports, hunting and off road four wheeling, I'd prolly apply...

    Really it's all up to you how you do yur job search, but just know, that usually when a department is hiring for fulltimers, they want guys who are going to stick around for a while.....guys who have done their homework on the department and the area,guys who want to work there and love what they do and the department and what it's all about.

    Basically what I am saying is they don't want someone on their department who looks at their fulltime firefighting position as "just another fulltime firefighting job" and that's why they applied for it, was because it was a fulltime firefighting position that was available and convenient.

    I know some guys might think otherwise, but I am really against the guys applying ANYWHERE and EVRYWHERE they can that are hiring fulltime firefighters. I am not saying you have to be extremely picky as a candidate, but you should do your homework about the area and department you apply for. To me, if you are going to work for a department, I think they can understandably expect you to commit yourself to that department and area for awhile, (potentially the rest of your life), and if you begin working and don't like more than what ya like, then it'll show in yur work and attitude, whether ya believe it or not. Things change and so do people, but generally if ya like the department and area you work for, you'll be leaps n bounds ahead of the guy who works there cuz' he was one of those who applied everywhere.

    It's just something I don't see a lot of the guys doing who do apply ANY and EVERY where. I know there are exceptions to the rule, but that's just what I think. It might look like they want the job that much more, and hell, for all I know, maybe they would love to live, work and play EVERY place they apply, but I highly doubt they even actually think about that, and it'll show eventually, which could lead them to quit or get fired.....something that could have been prevented with a little homework.

    I'm rambling so I have to go, but again, I hope you can understand the reason I asked:

    Why, knowing that you are not passionate about EMS & medical runs, did you apply for a fulltime firefighter/EMT-Basic position on this department if you knew that EMS & prehospital patient care was their main emphasis and passion?

    And overall, GOOD LUCK!
    Quote Originally Posted by jedch47 View Post
    You like me are probably just a small player in this big EMS game. I am sure that it all makes sense to the people in charge. I am under the impression that when you start in upper level managment you lose the majority of your common sense.

  15. #15

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Zach,

    They were/are part of a large consortium testing process. They weren't my intended Dept., but when you are invited, you take it. It isn't that I don't deliver EMS to my States standards, it is that the Dept expects, rightfully so, more than the status quo. It is more of a cultural mindset than an operational method. You won't find it on the website, talking shop with the guys as an outsider, or talking to the regional Training Councils. They deliver the same services with the same standards of care as any Dept in this region. But they hold themselves to a higher standard.

    I didn't step up to the plate right off the bat, because as has been said...my passion for the job isn't in that forte. I just deliver it at my level of training and did not wish to pursue further than that. I still don't have the passion to be a Medic, but I do understand the need for continuing education and don't accept status quo for myself anymore. I see the need for providing the best possible care for my patient. And the way to do that is building on my knowledge base.

    Hope that was sufficient for your question.

  16. #16
    Forum Member JayDudley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    1,265

    Default Fired??

    Zack....You answered the "Elephant in the room" question...Why would you sign up to do a job you should have known was at least 80% of your job.
    George....you were correct also......NEVER LIE AND CONCEAL INFORMATION!!

    However...when I was doing oral interviews with a person from Human Resorces and we had a candidate who was fired from a local Police Academy I was asked not to ask the "Elephant" question..."Why were you let go?"
    I later found out when I did the backgrounds.
    Respectfully,
    Jay Dudley
    Retired Fire
    Background Investigator
    IACOJ-Member
    Lifetime Member CSFA
    IAFF Alumni Member

  17. #17
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    122

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by breakingstuff View Post
    I prefer everything but the EMS.
    That is like a teacher saying "I like my job except being around all those kids." Remember - EMS is so much of what we do.

    Quote Originally Posted by breakingstuff View Post
    But again, that will not influence my ability to deliver care
    You may not think so, but IT DOES.

  18. #18

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1

    Wink You Survived

    Quote Originally Posted by breakingstuff View Post
    Whew...here goes. Its long, but its a good read (hell, its my story. I should know!):

    I love this profession with every fiber of my being. I have also been very fortunate in my pursuit in making it my occupation. I got a temp paid position when I was 19, and at 22 got a full time position with a very well respected Dept in my Region. I was also terminated from there during probation. I had 23 minutes left on my last shift of probation. The road since then has been rocky to say the least.

    For a good period, I was very socially introverted after this, and shut out many of my close friends, who are also in the fire service. Partly because of embarassment, partly because of shame that I could allow this to happen to myself. I was on unemployment for approx 7 mo.s, during which I sulked, hated, questioned and doubted everything pertaining to what happened, including my interest in the job anymore. Then, I got hired with my States Dept of Corrections. It has opened alot of doors for me, and has reinforced my love for the Fire Service. Its also given me the opportunity to pick myself off the floor, start paying bills and begin building some self-respect again.

    Since I got canned, I have actively tested, sometimes with my heart 110% into the respective Dept.'s process, others just going through the motions. I have an interview coming up on the 15th with a great Dept that is picking up several and am starting to let doubt creep back into my mind (its a very cyclitic thing, sometimes I am very confident in what I bring to the table...other times not). I dont want to spoil this great opportunity.

    The tough part of all this, is I have no tangible reason why it happened. I had a good Academy experience, but to be honest once I hit the floor with my assigned Company it was a different story. I had the personal stance of refusing to "play the game." I was a good probie. Dishes, coffee, house chores, rigs, newspaper, no dayroom, nose in the books.

    But my company didn't want that. They regard EMS highly, and I did (and honestly, dont that much) not. I wasn't able to shift gears and 'play the game' for the first 6 months. This put my crew in an awkward position, and they openly admitted they did everything they could to get me fired in that time frame. Something happened 1/2 way through, and my Company and I all got on the same side of the table. We actually started bonding and having a great shift together. Prior to this, there were mornings I hated coming to work. HATED. I also made a 2 hour (traffic) commute, which at first was absolutely worth it, but became dreadful. At the end, they even helped me plan my proposal to my now fiance! Great atmosphere, my evaluations went from constantly average-to-needing improvement to all average-above average, with great encouragment.

    When I got canned, my company was just as suprised as I was (and my LT and senior man dont hold their tongues and freely speak their mind..so they would of told me had they known). I was never given an official answer as to why, despite actively pursuing through emails, voicemails, etc. It makes it very difficult in interviews when asked "What happened" and I say "I dont know, but..." then go into my whole 5 minute schpeal.

    It hasn't quite been a year since all of this, but is fast approaching and I still get in my own way, and still find it very hard to accept and let go. I lost my financial stability, currently fighting a foreclosure and most importantly, lost my career (our identities are so bound up in that -- it's still what gives you a sense of value in the world).

    Any advice? Experience?
    You survived didnt you? Be proud of that. I have had 2 friends who fought fire with me who are now deceased by their own hand. One was a female and one was a male. They were both two of the coolest, kindest, willing to teach and learn, kind of people. They were both better firefighters than the people who fired them. Not that we shouldnt learn from our mistakes, but this is often the way things go. You will find the right dept. where you will fit in an people will appreciate you. Take this as a chance to continue to refine yourself so when you do get hired, youll be the best and most humble employee. Also realiqze that the firefighting is the icing on the cake and the Medical calls are where you are really needed and doing the most positive work. Imagine yourself as that patient and see how much more you are needed by every single one. Some need physical help and some need mental assistance ( The most challenging).
    Keep Hangin in there!
    Rhonda

  19. #19
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Local 2542
    Posts
    1

    Default

    While we could go on and on about the EMS side of this issue, it is my opinion that your problem is rooted in the relational side of station life. As previously stated: "I wasn't able to shift gears and 'play the game' for the first 6 months" could be the underlying symptom. Those of us that do this job professionally have all been in the position of playing the game. I have known and worked with recruits who have done all the tasks of the station perfectly but lacked the relational side and willingness to go the extra mile.

    Simply put, your willingness to 'play the game' shows those around you that you are here to help/learn/assist and make their lives easier around the station. In return, someone that puts forth that extra effort will receive help on the fire ground/ems runs from the crew that will make their life easier in learning the job. It sounds to me that you have done some "growing up" over the past year and I hope that you have found who you are as a person.

    I would never hide any part of your history if you do get the second opportunity to obtain a job in this great career. Echoing BCLepore they will know of your history. Turn it into a positive about who you are today when compared the person that you were a year ago. Hopefully you have learned to be humble after your experiences. If you have truly learned you should be able to carry that humble confidence with you into an interview.

    A wise whip once told me that as a recruit you have two ears and one mouth. Listen twice as much as you talk (and when you do talk ask questions). Do twice as many tasks than are asked of you. Do twice the effort now and it will return ten fold over the course of your career.

    Maybe this has helped you, but if not maybe it has helped others reading that have yet to start a career as a professional firefighter. Best of luck to you.

  20. #20
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    27

    Default Ems

    apply to a real fire department. departments that do mostly EMS and little to no fire duty are going to be like that. buffy ems, what a joke!

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. One more time and YOU'RE FIRED!!!!
    By StayBack500FT in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 63
    Last Post: 10-11-2007, 08:59 PM
  2. Ff Fired Or Not?
    By dday05 in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-12-2007, 10:44 PM
  3. Fired FF in NC! WHAT!?!?
    By nmfd615 in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 03-04-2007, 04:02 PM
  4. Fire Department Chaplain FIRED?
    By NJFFSA16 in forum The Off Duty Forums
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-16-2003, 01:18 AM
  5. GETTING FIRED
    By dr inferno in forum Career/Paid Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-01-2001, 02:59 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts