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    MembersZone Subscriber MalahatTwo7's Avatar
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    Default ResQPOD

    Anyone seen these or used one?

    Tools Can Save Cardiac Arrest Victims At Work. Experts: More CPR Training Would Save Lives

    Jessica Schaeffer, Contributing Writer UPDATED: 1:49 pm EDT July 22, 2008

    With more and more tools available for cardiac arrest victims, health organizations are pushing companies to make more of an effort to train their employees to save lives.

    It is estimated that more than 95 percent of victims of cardiac arrest, or the sudden loss of heart function, die before reaching the hospital, and many attacks occur in the workplace, according to the American Heart Association.

    This grim statistic and the recent death of NBC News executive Tim Russert have left many wondering if the level of business preparedness, including knowledge of CPR, automated external defibrillators (AEDs), and the fairly new device called the ResQPOD, could have saved Russert and the hundreds of other cardiac arrest victims each day.

    "Getting certified in CPR is strongly recommended for everyone, no matter who you are," reports the Emergency Preparedness Tips Web site. "Being certified to perform CPR can actually save a life."

    No Workplace Policy

    On Nov. 13, 2000, President Bill Clinton signed into law the Cardiac Arrest Survival Act, designed to expand the availability of AEDs in buildings owned or leased by the federal government.

    However, there is no such policy for the common workplace.

    Although it is highly recommended by the American Heart Association to place AEDs in all public areas and train employees in CPR, it is ultimately the employer's choice in private workplaces.

    CPR is an emergency medical procedure that is a combination of chest compressions and lung ventilation used to keep a flow of oxygenated blood to the heart and brain.

    Although it is unlikely that CPR will restart the heart, it will delay tissue death and permanent brain damage, which occurs within four to six minutes after a cardiac arrest.

    The combination of CPR and an AED, a computerized medical device that administers a shock to restore a natural heart rhythm, within five to seven minutes of the cardiac arrest will increase the survival rate to 30 to 45 percent, according to the American Heart Association.

    Another Survival Device

    Unbeknown to many, the ResQPOD, an Impedance Threshold Device, is a tool that further increases the chance of survival by noninvasively doubling the blood flow to the heart and brain during CPR.

    It is a mouthpiece used on the victim during the mouth-to-mouth portion of CPR and serves as a one-way valve that regulates when air enters the lungs. It has a timer that blinks when the patient should receive a breath, said Dr. Keith Lurie, who specializes in cardiology and internal medicine in Minneapolis and St. Cloud, Minn.

    Advanced Circulatory Systems, Inc
    This ResQPOD device doubles the blood flow to the heart and brain during CPR.

    "ResQPOD is definitely an advance, and we are excited about it," said Lurie, a member of the Take Heart America program.

    The device was first produced in Eden Prairie, Minn., in 1996, but began to be manufactured in its current form in 2003 after receiving approval from the Food and Drug Administration, Jim Flom, sales manager for Advance Circulatory, told the St. Cloud Times.

    The ResQPOD is now the most recommended device in cardiac arrest survival by the American Heart Association and has almost doubled the survival rates in cardiac arrest victims when used.

    However, not every city is choosing to use this device, including Washington, D.C.

    The outcome could have been different in the case of Tim Russert if the building where he had the attack was prepared with trained people and they had a ResQPOD, said Lurie.

    "Unfortunately, people are slow to change," he said.

    Anyone interested in having a ResQPOD can ask any health professional to prescribe one.

    Although Lurie emphasizes the significance of the ResQPOD, the importance of basic CPR and AEDs are not overlooked.

    "You can't just use one type of medicine on a cancer patient. You need 10. The same goes for a cardiac arrest victim," he said. "You need good CPR, you need the ResQPOD put on right away, and you need people willing to do CPR for 30 minutes until a medical professional can arrive."

    'It Is Absolutely Essential To Make Progress'

    Organizations are joining together to spread the word about cardiac arrest and the importance of being trained in CPR and AED use.

    The American Red Cross has gotten involved by starting the first annual CPR and AED Awareness Week this past June.

    They encouraged "states, cities and towns to establish organized programs that provide CPR and AED trainings and increase public access to AEDs."

    There have also been trials to demonstrate the importance of these devices, including the Public Access Defibrillation Trial conducted between July 2000 and January 2002.

    Nearly 1,000 public facilities, including apartment or office buildings, sports facilities, senior centers, and shopping malls, were selected and 20,000 volunteers were trained to either provide CPR alone or CPR and an AED. These volunteers and businesses were also equipped with around 1,500 installed AEDs throughout the buildings, according to the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

    In the 292 attempted resuscitations, there were 44 cardiac arrest survivors as a result of simple training and access to the correct tools.

    But Lurie emphasized that simply learning CPR is the first step to saving lives.

    "Since the vast majority of people are treated by a bystander, it is absolutely essential if we want to make progress in this No. 1 killer that everyone should learn to do basic CPR," said Lurie. "You can learn it in 20 minutes, and you can learn it in confidence so if a loved one falls down, you know what to do and you can act appropriately."

    Distributed by Internet Broadcasting.
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    MembersZone Subscriber voyager9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MalahatTwo7 View Post
    Unbeknown to many, the ResQPOD, an Impedance Threshold Device, is a tool that further increases the chance of survival by noninvasively doubling the blood flow to the heart and brain during CPR.

    It is a mouthpiece used on the victim during the mouth-to-mouth portion of CPR and serves as a one-way valve that regulates when air enters the lungs. It has a timer that blinks when the patient should receive a breath, said Dr. Keith Lurie, who specializes in cardiology and internal medicine in Minneapolis and St. Cloud, Minn.
    This article is misleading. It doesn't sound like it doubles the blood flow. It just helps maximize the flow by making sure the rescuer breathes when they're supposed to.
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    MembersZone Subscriber MalahatTwo7's Avatar
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    HEY! I didnt write the article, I just presented it. LOL Can't help it if the journalists can't get their facts straight heeheheheheehe
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    Quote Originally Posted by voyager9 View Post
    This article is misleading. It doesn't sound like it doubles the blood flow. It just helps maximize the flow by making sure the rescuer breathes when they're supposed to.
    That would be an incorrect assumption as this device has nothing to do with ventilation except for the blinky light. Really, that seems to be an add on to help prevent hyperventilation. The device actually works during CPR. As you press on the chest you create a positive pressure, when you release the chest the resqpod stops air from being drawn back into the lungs. This works to create a more negative intrathoracic pressure. More negative pressure means that the CPR you do will have that much more effect. Remember our heart fills and coronary ateries perfuse better with negative pressure which is usually provided when we breath. Because of the additional negative pressure that is created there is stated to be a doubling of the typical cardiac output that is created with CPR. This would mean that yes, it does double blood flow. Thats my breif response on an impedance threshold device(ITD) or brand name ResQpod, if you want the full info let me know and I can also hook you up with some links.

    As far as American heart is concerned, the ITD is considered a class IIa as of the last update. This means that it is in the same class as any of the meds you give in cardiac arrest as well as most interventions. The only two higher rated procedures are CPR and defib. Both are class I. With the research that is coming out on this device it will probably be a class I intervention in the next ACLS update.

    It just sucks they cost 90 bucks a piece.

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    Currently our department is part of this study. We have an ITD in every airway bag. It attaches between the BVM and the piece that covers the patients mouth and nose. If it actually works or not, i don't know, i haven't seen the research. I have heard that it does actually increase patient survivability, although there are times that we are not supposed to use it (things such as pregnancy) If anyone wants to see our SOPs on the use of the ITD message me and I will try to get a copy of them.

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    The ResQPOD is a great device, like Medic563 stated earlier the blinky lights is just a nice little add-on that helps you time your respirations in an intubated patient.

    The main purpose of the ResQPOD is in fact to allow air from the lungs to leave the body when you press on the chest, and to create a negative pressute that maximizes preload to the heart.

    Try to remember your Anatomy and Physiology classes from waaayyyyy back:

    Your lungs work like this: When the chest cavity expands it increases the volume of the chest creates a negative pressure. That negative pressure is causing the lungs to increase in volume and expand and create a negative pressure inside the lungs. The negative pressure in the lungs causes air to move from a high pressure environment (the air around us) to the low pressure environment (inside our lungs) and thats what we know as a breath.

    The ResQPOD is basically a very overpriced one-way valve, when we press down on the chest it allows the high-pressure air that we have "compressed" to leave the lungs. When we allow the chest to recoil we will have the normal negative pressure inside the chest cavity, but because of the ResQPOD there is no way for air to enter the lungs to create a balanced pressure. The negative pressure causes all hollow structures to swell and increase in size. Once you take the lungs out of the equation the only hollow structures left inside the chest cavity are the heart and the great vessels. Since the heart and the great vessels are "forced" to expand they now create a negative pressure in your veins that sucks blood from the rest of your body into your heart.

    Without the ResQPOD you really only have one way to fill the heart with blood. Gravity letting a small amount of blood flow into the heart to be pushed around when we do CPR. Thats why they used to tell us to elevate the feet, to let that extra blood flow from the legs into the heart so that we can push it into the brain with CPR. But if we can force more blood into the heart when we allow the chest to recoil, then we have more volume and more pressure to push towards the brain when we compress the chest again.

    It does increase blood flow dramatically, because it causes there to be more blood in the heart to begin with.

    If you are up to it you can read a little bit about the Frank-Starling law of the heart which goes into more detail
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    Forum Member Weruj1's Avatar
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    we got em .............Rick .....head to the EMS Forums ......and do a search !
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    The ResQPOD increases intrathoracic pressure, increasing preload so when the chest is compressed, more blood is pushed out of the heart increasing blood flow to the brain and lungs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by medic563 View Post
    That would be an incorrect assumption as this device has nothing to do with ventilation except for the blinky light. Really, that seems to be an add on to help prevent hyperventilation. The device actually works during CPR.
    I stand corrected, thanks for the info! I still think the article is misleading, it doesn't mention the true benefits of the device.
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    Quote Originally Posted by voyager9 View Post
    I stand corrected, thanks for the info! I still think the article is misleading, it doesn't mention the true benefits of the device.
    As per the norm of the media. I at first also thought it was an overpriced blinky light with a gimick one way valve at first. I also stood corrected after looking at quite a bit of the research.

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    We've been using them for about a year or so. I have not actually seen an increase in pt surviviability. I think if you witnessed an arrest, and started CPR and ALS measures immeadiatly then it might have a profound effect. But when you get called and have know idea how long they have been down, then they are probably brain dead anyway, even if you get a reversal.


    That being said we use the ResQPod on every arrest.

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    We use both the ResQPod and Autopulse. I wouldn't be surprised if a patient made contact with me while still in V-Fib. They are the shiz-net!!
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    We use them at the FD and Lucas County EMS has used them for awhile. Below is a link for the Lucas County results of their study.......

    http://co.lucas.oh.us/EMS/ResQPOD.pdf
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