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  1. #1
    MembersZone Subscriber MalahatTwo7's Avatar
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    Default Possible Charges Of Sabotage

    But at the same time, probably more than deserving:

    Sailors based at Esquimalt charged with sabotage. Two petty officers accused of harming high-security database in Ottawa

    Steve Carey and David Pugliese, Times Colonist; Canwest News Service
    Published: Wednesday, August 13, 2008

    Two sailors recently posted to CFB Esquimalt have been charged with sabotaging a high-security database in Ottawa last year.

    Petty Officer Second Class Sylvia Reid and Petty Officer Second Class Janet Sinclair were each charged with one count of sabotage, conspiracy, mischief in relation to data and wilful property damage. The charges stem from alleged corruption of a government computerized database in July 2007.

    "The database was a classified government database," said Capt. Paule Poulin, a public affairs officer with the Canadian Forces Provost Marshal.

    "As far as any other details, I can't discuss them, as the matter is going before the courts."

    The investigation was conducted by the Canadian Forces National Investigation Service, the investigative arm of the Canadian Forces Military Police.

    This appears to be an isolated incident, Poulin said. It has taken almost a year due to forensic research on electronic equipment.

    At the time of the alleged sabotage, both Reid and Sinclair were working for the Military Police at Canadian Forces Support Unit in Ottawa. The unit is inside National Defence Headquarters.

    The two women were recently posted from Ottawa to new positions at CFB Esquimalt. Reid was to serve aboard HMCS Regina, while Sinclair was to serve at Maritime Forces Pacific Headquarters. Although their postings were for mid-July, the two have not begun work onboard ship or at the base, said Lt.-Cmdr. Nathalie Garcia, base spokeswoman.

    "They just arrived here in August," said Garcia. "We're going to find some employment for each of them while the judicial process goes on. We don't know the nature of the employment yet."

    Reid joined the military in 1994 and is a naval combat information operator, responsible for running shipboard radar and associated equipment, including command and control communications computers and intelligence systems.

    Sinclair is a sonar operator, responsible for analyzing sonar and oceanographic data. Sinclair joined the military in 1987.

    Most computer applications use databases in some form, experts say, and corrupting a database could involve a wide range of actions, ranging from accessing or copying restricted files to accidental deletion of information in a database. It could also involve introducing a virus into the system.

    Michel Drapeau, a retired colonel and an Ottawa lawyer who co-wrote a textbook on military law, said the charge of sabotage is very serious, particularly when Canada is at war. Such a charge would normally be laid against a foreign agent.

    "What I find odd is that is a very serious offence but they are being allowed to continue to serve," he said. "I'm surprised they haven't been suspended from duty or put on administrative leave."

    Drapeau said the Defence Department has been known to bring down the full force of military law in cases where it might not have been warranted.

    The charges have now gone to the director of military prosecution, who will decide whether the case should be heard as a court martial or should go before civilian court.

    It is not known if Reid and Sinclair requested a posting at CFB Esquimalt or if they were ordered there. Military officials declined to release more details about the women, including ages and hometowns, citing the federal government's Privacy Act.

    scarey@tc.canwest.com

    MILITARY SABOTAGE

    - Cases of sabotage against the Canadian military are rare. In 2004 the water supply at the Canadian base in Kabul was tampered with but military officers believed the incident was the result of a prank gone bad.

    - In 2002 the military investigated a suspected case of sabotage after sugar was found in the engine oil of a Sea King helicopter. The contamination was found during a routine oil change of a helicopter that had flown from its base in Halifax to Victoria.

    © Times Colonist (Victoria) 2008


  2. #2
    Forum Member firecat1's Avatar
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    "They just arrived here in August," said Garcia. "We're going to find some employment for each of them while the judicial process goes on. We don't know the nature of the employment yet."
    I wonder if they'll get KP duty, peeling potatoes?

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    In my ship,if you got on restriction and extra duty or EMI(Extra Military Instruction-LOTS of Extra,little Military and you were supposed to figure the Instruction of "Don't do that again"yerself),you were assigned to the Chief Master at Arms(aka Ship's Sheriff) who'd go to all the Chiefs and ask if they had any sh** details that no one in their division had screwed up enough to earn.
    If the bilges in any engineering space needed cleaning,you got the job.
    Scrubbing out the grease deposits in the ventilators in the galley?You got the job.
    The drains in Officer's Country heads need cleaning?Guess what?......
    A Chief Petty Officer in the Navy can make a sailor's life more miserable than anything a commissioned officer can come up with.They've had it done to them and done it to other sailors a few times before,or seen it done to others.
    At any rate,(get it?rate? a navy story?I kill myself!)PO2s should know better than to do something like what these are charged with,especially if they ever had any aspiration to wearing khaki and anchors in the future.
    Last edited by doughesson; 08-13-2008 at 11:50 AM.

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    MembersZone Subscriber MalahatTwo7's Avatar
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    I dont know the persons individually, but I do know a lot about the CN. And one thing is for sure, neither the NCIOP or TASOP trades move really fast. Sure you can be promoted quickly in both jobs, but typically I would hazard a guess that both of these persons (I hesitate to use the word "Ladies) would have at least 10 or maybe 12 years service to have obtained the rank of Petty Officer Second Class. That suggests that they are both well experienced in their jobs.

    The one thing that puzzles me though is their last assignment in Ottawa. To be working with the Provost Marshall's office in NDHQ hints at something more that meets the eye here. Last time I was with the Fleet, the PM's office was not a navy shore duty station, unless you were specifically unfit sea duties and were scheduled to be reclassified in a new trade. I am very interested to see what else gets released to the news.

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    MembersZone Subscriber MalahatTwo7's Avatar
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    Mr Black brings up a good point, but I think I also see what the Service is trying to do at the same time - I think.... Pending full investigation and sentencing.

    Sabotage charges could land sailors 10 years in jail

    Canwest News Service Published: Thursday, August 14, 2008

    Two Esquimalt-based sailors could face up to a maximum of 10 years in prison and dismissal from the Canadian Forces if they are found guilty of sabotage in a case involving a classified computer database at Ottawa's National Defence headquarters.

    The rare charges were laid Tuesday by the Canadian Forces National Investigation Service in relation to what Defence Department officials allege is the corruption of the database.

    If the charges proceed to a court martial, it is likely that such a hearing won't start until early next year. A court martial is usually held at the location where the alleged incident took place, in this case Ottawa.

    Petty Officer Second Class Sylvia Reid and Petty Officer Second Class Janet Sinclair were each charged Tuesday with one count of sabotage, one count of conspiracy, one count of mischief in relation to data and one count of willful property damage in relation to the alleged corruption of the database in July 2007.

    The two were recently posted from Ottawa to new positions at CFB Esquimalt. Reid was to serve aboard HMCS Regina, while Sinclair was to serve at Maritime Forces Pacific Headquarters. Sinclair is a sonar operator while Reid is a naval combat information systems operator.

    The two are still on duty but will be moved to less sensitive jobs in the Canadian Forces, according to military officials. But the decision to allow the women to continue working has some questioning the severity of the incident.

    "That raises the question about how serious can this be if you leave them still working?" said NDP defence critic Dawn Black. "Sabotage is a very serious charge, but it doesn't appear to fit with the fact they haven't been suspended, even suspended with pay."

    Military officials declined to discuss what effect, if any, the incident had on government operations. They would also not provide details on what computer system was involved, other to say that it was a government network.

    © Times Colonist (Victoria) 2008


    As for the "less sensative jobs", that just means they will be downgraded to manual labour (stacking/setting chairs) working for Base Manpower, doing all the odd jobs that are not regularly assigned. Not a bad place if you're staff, like I was, assigning those jobs. But it kinda sucks if you're the worker, being employed away from your regular duties and all.

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    MembersZone Subscriber voyager9's Avatar
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    I don't know much about the law-side but this cracks me up:
    Most computer applications use databases in some form, experts say, and corrupting a database could involve a wide range of actions, ranging from accessing or copying restricted files to accidental deletion of information in a database. It could also involve introducing a virus into the system.
    In other words the Navy won't say what they did so the paper is making some assumptions "We don't know what they did, but it involved a computer."
    So you call this your free country
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