1. #1
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    Default Airline Safety Briefings

    Whenever I fly, I try to get the exit row seats, but according to one booking agent, those are always the first to fill up because of the "extra leg room".

    Memo warns failure to heed airline safety instructions could get passengers sued

    Jack Branswell and Phil Couvrette, Canwest News Service Published: Sunday, August 17, 2008

    OTTAWA -- Like most people, you probably tune out as flight attendants give their safety briefing before the plane takes off, but if you're in an exit row, you might want to think twice about not paying attention.

    Transport Canada documents obtained by Canwest News Service question whether there is a possibility that exit row passengers could be sued if they ignore the instructions and someone is injured or dies as a result.

    A cabin safety standards inspector with Transport Canada raised that possibility in an e-mail to a colleague, obtained by Canwest News Service.

    The e-mail quoted an Air Law and Commerce article from 2003 that suggested that "holding exit row passengers liable for damages resulting from their inattention to safety materials could deter exit row passengers from ignoring safety information and compensate those victims harmed."

    The e-mail also questioned whether cabin crew on the plane, "those responsible for informing exit row passengers of their duties could also become targets for a 'negligence cause of action.' In the end, the airline could likely become involved in such actions. Thus, the importance of providing exit row passengers with detailed briefings to prepare them for emergencies cannot be underestimated," Christopher Dann, the inspector, wrote.

    Dann said that the 2003 article by Wendy Gerwick was the only published work that he was aware of on the topic.

    Jean Riverin, a Transport Canada spokesman, said his department is not aware of any specific legal action against an exit row passenger resulting from an incident or accident. Transport Canada would not comment directly on the potential for lawsuits.

    Canadian airlines are required to brief passengers in exit rows on how to open the emergency door, but the question of when and if they should do it is far more murky and that potentially opens the door to lawsuits.

    Transport Canada regulations require exit row passengers to be able to understand the safety briefing, be physically able to open the door, to be able to determine visually if the door is safe to open and that they be of a minimum age, established by the airline. If they don't meet those criteria, the airlines have to ask them to change seats.

    The U.S. National Transportation Safety Board has reviewed the issue of exit row passengers and the results weren't great. In six cases it looked at, its questionnaire found that passengers had difficulty in knowing when to open the emergency exits. It found that in two cases, exits that should have remained closed were opened. In other case, flight crew ordered an evacuation from the forward exits only, but a passenger still opened an exit over the plane's wing.

    The board also found that passengers had trouble assessing conditions outside the plane. In one case, passengers opened an exit and smoke started flowing into the plane. Two passengers were severely burned as they jumped through fire as they exited the plane.

    It also concluded that most passengers don't read safety information on the plane and that "exit procedures for emergency evacuations are critical and if not followed could lead to tragedy."

    A recent Australian Transportation Safety Board study also found "passenger attention to safety communications were found to be generally low." It noted that in part that may be because "perceptions that it is socially undesirable to pay attention to safety information."

    In Canada, the question of whether a passenger could sue a fellow passenger, the airline or both is extremely complex because it isn't necessarily clear what jurisdiction the case would fall under. Where it happens and where the plane was from could be factors. For example, civil suits in Quebec fall under that province's civil code but in the rest of Canada, common law is used.

    In Quebec, retired civil law professor Claude Fabien says it would be difficult to sue someone for damages if they are trying to help others and it ends in injury. Fabien said the code essentially exonerates anyone of blame if they are trying to help someone else.

    "The passenger would really have to do something very stupid to not enjoy immunity from this rule. The goal of the rule is to encourage people to help others without having to worry about a civil lawsuit."

    While there is "no initial obligation to help others," under common law, University of Montreal law professor Stephane Beaulac says, exit row passengers could potentially become liable if things go wrong after "explicitly or implicitly" accepting to help in case of an emergency.

    They can do the latter by "listening to the briefing of the crew and acknowledging, giving the impression they accepted the mandate to help." In that case, Beaulac added, "there must not be negligence and passengers must to the best of their abilities be able to follow the crew's directives."

    If there is negligence, in theory the passengers could be held responsible and have to pay for damages.

    But lawsuits are more likely to target the airlines, which have deeper pockets, Beaulac noted.

    "The entire process of delegating, giving a mandate, a responsibility to someone with no expertise in the evacuation of the plane," could be called into question, he said. The passengers could sue the airline, raising issue with the instructions or the problematic character of the delegation process.

    Neither Air Canada nor WestJet would comment on the potential for lawsuits over exit row passenger issues.

    Canwest News Service 2008

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    I read the emrgency information on every flight I have ever taken.

    Perhaps the rest of the passengers should take the time to read it and know what the frack to do if there is an in flight emergency... of course, that's common sense, which isn't too common.
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptainGonzo View Post
    I read the emrgency information on every flight I have ever taken.

    Perhaps the rest of the passengers should take the time to read it and know what the frack to do if there is an in flight emergency... of course, that's common sense, which isn't too common.
    But that information is more of the "How's".. and not the "Whens". Every flight I've been on where I read and/or listened to the information talks about how to open the door..etc. and usually include "When directed by flight crew" or something.

    If you're going to sit in an exit row then you should take the time to know how to act in that capacity, which includes opening the door. That does not include any training in in-flight emergencies and how/when/why to open the door.
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    Well, if you requested that seat then you should be informed on the procedures, but if that's the only seat available, I don't think you should be held liable for not paying attention to the directions and instructions in case of an emergency. If you didn't choose to be there and there's no room to move or no one wants to switch (which is pretty rare), then you're not willfully given your consent on the understanding of the seat and what its responsibilities hold; you are being forced to do so.

    Now, this case is pretty rare from what I can gather from experience and knowledge so this sort of situation would only happen every so often. I do agree, though, if you're sitting in that area, you should be well aware of the instructions and directions given. If you're there, you more than likely asked to be there and should have known the responsibilities of the area.
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    As an ex Air Force person and 6'2" makes it easier for me to get those seats by the exits with extra leg room.

    Simple rule.

    A. Fire inside, clear sky outside, open door.
    B. Fire Outside, clear inside, leave door closed and find another.
    C. Fire inside and outside, beat head against hard object until sensless.
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    Being a former ARFF Chief I request an emergency exit seat whenever I fly. Gives you plenty of leg room and I feel better being the first one out!!!
    Jason Knecht
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    Altoona Fire Dept.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dickey View Post
    Being a former ARFF Chief I request an emergency exit seat whenever I fly. Gives you plenty of leg room and I feel better being the first one out!!!
    Although I'm not ARFF anything, I am 100% with the last part. Unfortunately, as I said above, anytime that I fly (unless I am in a group) I always request the exit row, but its always "full". Just means that we'll all be making a door mat of the person who is sitting there, trying to figure it out, I guess.
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    To quote the late/great Carlin:
    I locate my nearest emergency exit, and then I plan my route. You have to plan your route. It's not always a straight line, is it? Sometimes there's a really big fat f*** sitting right in front of you. Well, you know you'll never get over him. I look around for women and children, midgets and dwarves, cripples, war widows, paralyzed veterans, people with broken legs, anybody who looks like they can't move too well; the emotionally disturbed come in VERY handy at a time like this. You might have to go out of your way to find these people, but you'll get out of the plane a lot God damn quicker, believe me. I say, "Let's see... I'll go around the fat f***... step on the widow's head... push those children out of the way... knock down the paralyzed midget, and get out of the plane where I can help others."

    I can be of no help to anyone if I'm lying unconscious in the aisle with some big c***s***er standing on my head. I must get out of the plane, go to a nearby farmhouse, have a Dr. Pepper, and call the police.
    So you call this your free country
    Tell me why it costs so much to live
    -3dd

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