1. #1

    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    1

    Default Hot Surface Ignition of Gasoline Vapor

    I have been trudging through references for a little while now and could very well be overlooking something obvious. Anyway, I was wondering if anyone was aware of any published results/publications indicating what the hot surface ignition temperature of standard pump gasoline vapor would be. I have been unable to find any definitive numbers/estimates. I have found guidelines and very approximate temperature ranges only.

    Thank you in advance for your time and assistance!

  2. #2
    CFEI / CFII
    cubbie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    220

    Default Gasoline Data

    References: (1) ASTM D 439.
    (2) Ignition Handbook pages 849-853 and (Table 2) page 1057.

    Auto Ignition Temperature depends on Octane level and atmospheric pressure.
    Last edited by cubbie; 09-21-2008 at 04:45 PM.

    When fire is cried and danger is neigh,
    "God and the firemen" is the people's cry;
    But when 'tis out and all things righted,
    God is forgotten and the firemen slighted.
    ~Author unknown, from The Fireman's Journal, 18 Oct 1879

  3. #3
    Forum Member
    nmfire's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Maryland (DC Suburb)
    Posts
    5,738

    Default

    A very very brief Google search reveals a hot surface autoignition temperature between 475 and 500 degrees.
    Even the burger-flippers at McDonald's probably have some McWackers.

  4. #4
    CFEI / CFII
    cubbie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    220

    Default Some more information for you to consider

    Quote Originally Posted by cubbie View Post
    References: (1) ASTM D 439. (2) Ignition Handbook pages 849-853 and (Table 2) page 1057.

    Auto Ignition Temperature depends on Octane level and atmospheric pressure.
    Here is some additional information for you to consider.

    Quote from NFPA 921 Chapter 25 para 25.3.1

    "Autoignition of a liquid in contact with a heated surface generally requires a temperature substantially greater than the published laboratory autoignition temperatures of that liquid. For example, the range of laboratory autoignition temperature for gasoline in 495-536 F. Studies that simulate conditions in motor vehicles have shown that the minimum temperature of a heated surface required to ignite liquid gasoline is several hundred degrees greater than this range".

    Additional reference to look at:
    Fire and Arson Investigator Oct 2005 edition pages 18-21
    "Autoignition of Gasoline on Hot Surfaces"
    LaPointe, N.R., Adams, C. T., and Washington J.
    Last edited by cubbie; 09-21-2008 at 04:46 PM.

    When fire is cried and danger is neigh,
    "God and the firemen" is the people's cry;
    But when 'tis out and all things righted,
    God is forgotten and the firemen slighted.
    ~Author unknown, from The Fireman's Journal, 18 Oct 1879

  5. #5
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Jul 1999
    Location
    Flanders, NJ
    Posts
    13,537

    Default

    Where did you look? This is from FIREDOCS:

    Clodfelter, R. G.
    Hot Surface Ignition and Aircraft Safety Criteria.
    Wright Research and Development Center, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH
    901950;
    SAE. Aerospace Technology Conference and Exposition. SAE Technical Paper Series. October 1-4, 1990, Long Beach, CA, 1-19 pp, 1990.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Colwell, D. J.; Reza, A.
    Hot Surface Ignition of Automotive and Aviation Fluids.
    Exponent Failure Analysis Associates, Los Angeles, CA
    Exponent Failure Analysis Associates, Phoenix, AZ
    Fire Technology, Vol. 41, No. 2, 105-123, April 2005.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Duarte, D.; Drysdale, D. D.
    Effect of Local Confinement on the Ignition of Flammable Vapor/Air Mixtures at a Hot Surface.
    Edinburgh Univ., Scotland
    Interscience Communications Ltd.; National Institute of Standards and Technology; Building Research Establishment; and Society of Fire Protection Engineers. Interflam 1993. (Interflam '93). Fire Safety. International Fire Conference, 6th. March 30-April 1, 1993, Oxford, England, Interscience Communications Ltd., London, England, Franks, C. A., Editor, 665-673 pp, 1993.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Duarte, D.; Rohatgi, J.
    Mechanics of Ignition by Hot Surfaces.
    Federal University of Pernambucco, Recife, Brazil
    Journal of Applied Fire Science, Vol. 7, No. 2, 165-180, 1997/1998.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Goodall, D. G.; Ingle, R.
    Ignition of Inflammable Fluids by Hot Surfaces.
    Rolls-Royce, Ltd., Derby, England
    Aircraft Engineering, 20-24,29,35-36, April 1986.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Goodall, D. G.; Ingle, R.
    Ignition of Inflammable Fluids by Hot Surfaces.
    Rolls-Royce, Ltd., Derby, England
    Esso Air World, Vol. 19, 8-12, July/August 1966.
    American Society for Testing and Materials. Test Methods for Fire Resistance of Hydraulic Fluids and Lubricants Symposium. January 26, 1966, New Orleans, LA, 1966.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Gratz, R.; Wagenknecht, M.
    Heibe Oberflachen als Zundquelle fur reins Acetylen. [Hot Surfaces as Ignition Point for Pure Acetylene.]
    VFDB, No. 3, 103-111, February 1994.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Johnson, A. M.; Roth, A. J.; Moussa, N. A.
    Hot Surface Ignition Tests of Aircraft Fluids. Final Report. May 1987-May 1988.
    Boeing Advanced Systems, Seattle, WA
    Blazetech Corp., Winchester, MA
    Air Force Wright Aeronautical Labs., Wright-Patterson AFB, OH
    AFWAL-TR-88-2101; 233 p. November 1988.
    PROUD, HONORED AND HUMBLED RECIPIENT OF THE PURPLE HYDRANT AWARD - 10/2007.

  6. #6
    CFEI / CFII
    cubbie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    220

    Default

    George,
    Lots of references....what conclusions did they come too after their testing.

    When fire is cried and danger is neigh,
    "God and the firemen" is the people's cry;
    But when 'tis out and all things righted,
    God is forgotten and the firemen slighted.
    ~Author unknown, from The Fireman's Journal, 18 Oct 1879

  7. #7
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Jul 1999
    Location
    Flanders, NJ
    Posts
    13,537

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cubbie View Post
    George,
    Lots of references....what conclusions did they come too after their testing.
    Didn't read them. But then again, I am not doing the research project.

    I like what NFPA 921 has to say. It is my understanding that the ignition is also influenced by ventilation. Too much air blowing across the surface would hinder the ability of the liquid to volatilize fast enough to allow ignition. Too little air blowing across the surface causes an atmospher that is too rich.
    PROUD, HONORED AND HUMBLED RECIPIENT OF THE PURPLE HYDRANT AWARD - 10/2007.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. ?? about keyless ignition
    By fieldseng2 in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 02-28-2006, 09:10 PM
  2. Renault's Card Ignition....
    By lutan1 in forum University of Extrication
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-12-2002, 07:27 AM
  3. Gore brand vapor barrier
    By Firefighter430 in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-06-2002, 07:07 AM
  4. Gasoline, HOT SURFACE IGNITION
    By Bob Ballard in forum Fire Investigation
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 11-13-2001, 02:02 AM
  5. What brand of Turn-Out gear Vapor Barrier do you have?
    By Firefighter430 in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-06-2001, 05:49 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Log in

Click here to log in or register