1. #1
    MembersZone Subscriber
    MalahatTwo7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Loco madidus effercio in rutilus effercio.
    Posts
    12,837

    Talking Meals By Men; The New Gastrosexual

    HEHEHEEHEEEEE

    Meals by men. Modern males are steaming up the kitchen with their sexy culinary skills

    Robin Summerfield, Canwest News Service Published: Wednesday, October 01, 2008

    They're hot and they make loins quiver.

    They also make one mean loin.

    They're members of the growing brotherhood of modern men, dubbed gastrosexuals, who use their considerable culinary skills and big, shiny appliances to impress the ladies in their lives.

    They woo whilst whisking, braising, simmering and sauteing. A KitchenAid stand mixer is their power tool of choice.

    The first use of the term seems to have surfaced last July when a London Daily Mail reporter wrote about a study examining the emergence of the gastrosexual in modern culture.

    The story cited a study by food company PurAsia which found 48 per cent of people believe cooking skills make a person more attractive. The report also revealed 23 per cent of 18 to 34 year-old men say they cook "to potentially seduce a partner."

    The average gastrosexual male is between 25 and 44 years old, "upwardly mobile, well-travelled and cooks for (his) own pleasure and praise of others," according to the article.

    It's also clear anecdotally that more heterosexual men are sharpening their culinary skills these days.

    Their motives are honourable. They love cooking, they love eating and they love entertaining. The side benefits? Ladies love a guy who can cook.

    "Being handy has always been a turn-on for women. I mean, if you can handle a Globo knife, maybe you're not so bad with a bra strap," says Allan Shewchuk, a Calgary lawyer and avowed foodie, pointing to the well-known line of professional quality knives.

    Shewchuk has parlayed his own passion for food, cooking and entertaining into a teaching gig at the Cookbook Co. Cooks for the past 11 years.

    His first class - teaching men how to cook simple but delicious dishes to impress women - was called Seduction Meals for Men. It sold out and then backfired.

    That class in 1997 was full of "sex-starved women there to find out how to seduce men," says Shewchuk with a laugh.

    Times have changed.

    Increasingly, modern men are boning up on their cooking skills in classes and getting their chops down at home, says Shewchuk, who now teaches Italian cooking for both men and women.

    The rise in popularity of the Food Network, with its roster of celebrity chefs like bad boy Gordon Ramsey and good boy Jamie Oliver, has also fuelled the gastrosexual revolution.

    Shewchuk believes modern men are a "little more sophisticated" and that accounts, in part, for their interest in gastronomy.

    His male cooking students tend to be more mature, more aware of food and wine culture and find cooking therapeutic and relaxing, {MalNote: Ok, I dont know about the theraputic/relaxing bit} he says. And while they're not necessarily taking cooking classes to learn how to seduce women, they soon find out that women love men who cook well, he says.

    "There is something to this."

    Yet, there are limits to becoming too good in the kitchen, he warns.

    "Nobody likes someone who is pretentious or a snob," Shewchuk, 48, says. "It would turn someone off."

    Having expertise in the kitchen is a turn-on for other, more pragmatic reasons.

    "The more (men) can do this, the more (women) think, 'You can do this, and I don't have to do this', " says Shewchuk, who has been with Pat Blocksom, also a lawyer, for the past 12 years. The couple married a year ago.

    His talents in the kitchen reveal the sensual, sensitive and softer sides of her husband, says Blocksom, 53. It's also a shared experience and a celebration of life, she adds.

    "That's what's so sexy about a man who can cook - you can do it together and you can enjoy it together," says Blocksom, who raves about her husband's homemade spinach and ricotta ravioli.

    Katie Havercroft-McKinnon is only too happy to be official taster to her husband's culinary creations.

    David McKinnon, 30, is a lawyer by day and a serious foodie and home chef by night. His braised short rib recipe is killer, he whips up creative and colourful salads that dazzle and often greets his beloved at the end of the work day with dinner already on the go.

    Do his skillet skills turn her on?

    "Absolutely," says Havercroft-McKinnon, 31. His passion and creativity in the kitchen make her swoon, adds the energy consultant.

    "He takes care of me. When he cooks for me, he's telling me he loves me."

    McKinnon, who was raised on a steady diet of cooking shows like Urban Peasant and Wok with Yan, {hahaha I remember him too!} and made his first-ever meal at age five, crab salad sandwiches for his mom, has advice for the budding gastrosexual.

    "Simplicity is gold. If you use fresh ingredients, you're off to the races."

    Simplicity, in the form of some down-home cooking, also worked well for Dickson Yip.

    "She's the only (woman) I cooked for and I ended up marrying her," says the 37-year-old former chef who now works as a draftsman in Calgary.

    Of course, stovetop seduction is not new. Women have done it for generations, without the fancy name. Male gastrosexuality is merely a contemporary role reversal, a twist on the adage: The way to a man's heart is through his stomach.

    "Using food as a seduction tool has been around forever but I think the act of cooking has recently been elevated to a form of entertainment, and more guys want to get in on the fun," writes Bob Blumer, a.k.a. the Surreal Gourmet and star of the Food Network series Glutton for Punishment, in an e-mail.

    Blumer, who broke the Guinness World Record for pancake-flipping last summer in Calgary, believes modern men are also attracted to the "growing arsenal of cooking toys."

    Attraction to men with mad skills in the kitchen also goes beyond what ends up on the plate, Blumer adds.

    "Self-confidence is the greatest aphrodisiac," he writes. "If a guy has the instincts to transform a set of ingredients into a great meal, he is exposing a sensitive side of himself."

    And, continues Blumer, "if he has the (cojones) to prepare it in front of a date, without slicing his finger off, he is making a bold statement."

    For kitchen neophytes, Blumer suggests starting small.

    "Find a recipe or a cookbook you are comfortable with and start by mastering a single dish," writes Blumer, whose first cookbook, 1992's The Surreal Gourmet: Real Food For Pretend Chefs, was aimed at people, both men and women, without much prior cooking experience.

    "Have a signature dish," adds Shewchuk, and keep it simple. Pasta is a good place to start, he says. {mine is cajun snapper, although I can do a pretty mean roast beef or chicken on the grill too. }

    And practice, practice, practice.

    Otherwise, the seduction dance of the modern gastrosexual can quickly transform into something entirely unsexy, and fast.

    As Shewchuk says: "You're not seducing anyone if they're driving up to the emergency room at the Foothills (hospital) with a cut or third-degree burns."

  2. #2
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Memphis Tn,USA-now
    Posts
    5,436

    Default

    When I fix Bunny Helper,substituting rabbit for chicken or Buffalo Helper, my nieces don't come to the table.
    A guy who can cook doesn't get all the ladies,pal.Maybe it's that I don't break out the good silverware.

  3. #3
    MembersZone Subscriber
    MalahatTwo7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Loco madidus effercio in rutilus effercio.
    Posts
    12,837

    Default

    A guy who can cook doesn't get all the ladies,pal.
    No, you're right. Just the smart ones!

  4. #4
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Southeast PA
    Posts
    110

    Default

    I have a culinary degree, not that it means I know how to cook, but I've been around a few kitchens :-) It doesn't hurt "relations", if you know what I mean.

  5. #5
    MembersZone Subscriber
    MalahatTwo7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Loco madidus effercio in rutilus effercio.
    Posts
    12,837

    Default

    I concur with the Lady in the article - I don't do wine sauce either, but might be willing to experiment with the other stuff.

    Same old fish story still tastes good to me

    Pam Freir, Times Colonist Published: Wednesday, October 01, 2008

    Fish is fast food in our house. {mine too! } Fast, easy and always a favourite. But we're in a bit of a rut: We always cook our piece of fish the same old way. And whatever the fish -- salmon, snapper, halibut -- we always preface the process with the same go-nowhere conversation. Here, for example, is a sample halibut riff:

    "Halibut tonight, eh? How shall we cook it?"

    "We could boil it for a change."

    "Ha ha."

    "We could bake it en papillote."

    "En what?" {I asked that too. }

    "Or barbecue it."

    "It'll stick to the grill."

    "Right. OK then, let's just do the same old-same old."

    So that's what we do. We dredge it in flour with some salt and pepper, then we fry it up in a hot, lightly oiled, cast-iron frying pan. I follow the 10-minutes-per-inch-of-thickness rule. My co-chef follows his instincts. Our fish is cooked perfectly every time no matter who mans the pan. It's good simple fare. But I'm ready to move on. So I go exploring.

    First I consult the most authoritative source we have: The Encyclopedia of Fish by A.J. McClane who proceeds to lead me on a merry chase through the bewildering world of fish nomenclature. Halibut, it turns out, is a flounder and there are at least a dozen varieties of flounder. Then, for further elucidation, I'm referred on to "sole." I'm hopelessly lost by this time. Floundering, you might say.

    But McClane does offer up an impressive collection of recipes for the halibut/flounder/sole family: Florentine (with spinach and Gruyere cheese); Normande (with apples, shrimps and Bechamel sauce); Veronica (with mushrooms and grapes) and one other- very promising- with whisky. But this one calls for two kinds of sauce. Far too complicated. I consider beating a hasty retreat back to the frying pan.

    Instead I consult Marcella Hazan. She is marginally more helpful. Several recipes suggest that "any fish will do," many require a whole fish, and two are halibut-specific. However, one calls for a squid sauce -- scratch that -- and the other involves white wine and anchovies. This might be promising, but the prospect of the anchovy's intrusive pungency married to the delicate flavour of my fresh halibut, gives me pause. I could be eating for two.

    On to English Seafood Cookery by Richard Stein: two halibut recipes. One asks for a hollandaise sauce. Too bad. I don't do sauce. The other requires the halibut to be baked in foil with a splash of white wine and a little dill. Now that's promising. It's also doable, or would be if I had some dill in the house. Maybe another time.

    Jamie Oliver likes to splash coconut milk on monkfish and wrap it in a banana leaf. He likes to bake whole fish in bucket-loads of sea salt. He's very fond of scallops, swordfish, sunfish and trout. And he makes a hearty fish pie that I'm sure would accommodate our halibut but it's one of those stove-side marathons I'd prefer to avoid.

    Julia Child poaches every piece of fish she meets. Preferably European sole. Then she drowns it in a rich white-wine sauce. My quest for simplicity is obviously lost on Julia, so I turn finally to Out of Old Nova Scotia Kitchens by Marie Nightingale: Salt cod, shad, herring, mackerel, eel and smelts. No halibut.

    Marie does suggest sandwiching a bread stuffing between two filets of anonymous fish but then she insists on cooking it in -- you guessed it -- white sauce.

    I give up and report back to my co-chef who is waiting patiently, with our lump of halibut, by the frying pan.

    "Go for it," I say. "Same old-same old is just fine with me."

    © Times Colonist (Victoria) 2008

  6. #6
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Southeast PA
    Posts
    110

    Default

    "We could bake it en papillote."

    That is steamed in a parchment paper pouch, typically with related accoutrements. Not bad, typically makes for a very moist, flaky fish.

  7. #7
    Forum Member
    firecat1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Betwixt here and there.
    Posts
    3,478

    Default

    "Have a signature dish," adds Shewchuk, and keep it simple. Pasta is a good place to start, he says. {mine is cajun snapper, although I can do a pretty mean roast beef or chicken on the grill too. }
    Is that what you were doing?

  8. #8
    MembersZone Subscriber
    MalahatTwo7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Loco madidus effercio in rutilus effercio.
    Posts
    12,837

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Northeast68 View Post
    "We could bake it en papillote."

    That is steamed in a parchment paper pouch, typically with related accoutrements. Not bad, typically makes for a very moist, flaky fish.
    Frig'n French. Why can't THEY keep it simple and just "In a paper bag" and be done with it? LOL

  9. #9
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Southeast PA
    Posts
    110

    Default

    Agreed...those sickos eat cuisses de grenouilles! (Frog Legs)

    Don't panic, I had to look that up!

  10. #10
    MembersZone Subscriber
    MalahatTwo7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Loco madidus effercio in rutilus effercio.
    Posts
    12,837

    Default

    "Don't Panic"?????
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  11. #11
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Southeast PA
    Posts
    110

    Default

    That's funny right there...I don't care who you are.

  12. #12
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Erie, PA/ Home of Lake Effect Snow
    Posts
    314

    Default

    Think hard now, remember the movie Stripes? When they were in the General's house with the MP's??? That's my kind of cooking!

  13. #13
    MembersZone Subscriber
    MalahatTwo7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Loco madidus effercio in rutilus effercio.
    Posts
    12,837

    Talking

    Perhaps you are referring to either of these itmes?
    Attached Images Attached Images   

  14. #14
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Stamford, CT
    Posts
    411

    Default

    Food is life to us I-talians. I've been in the kitchen since I was knee high. And the French have nothing on us...except for alot of unnecessary words. I can't even imagine not being able to cook...I love to eat too much to have to wait for someone else to do it.
    The best way to have a "happy ending" for the night is to treat your woman to a fine meal prepared by you..do the dishes and that's it..you're in...= )


    Cogs

  15. #15
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Memphis Tn,USA-now
    Posts
    5,436

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Northeast68 View Post
    Agreed...those sickos eat cuisses de grenouilles! (Frog Legs)

    Don't panic, I had to look that up!
    Hey,don't knock frog's legs.They taste just like chicken.
    Possum,when prepared correctly for the table,is not killed on sight.
    You catch it in a sack and take it home to pen up and feed table scraps to for a few days first.
    Under no circumstances: DO NOT LET THE KIDS NAME THE POSSUM!
    After a few days of eating food from a controlled source,the wierd tastes from what it HAD been eating,roadkill,mice bird eggs,et cetera,et cetera,et cetera goes away, you can cook it up using any pork recipes because opossum tastes just like pork.

    PS.I also noticed my spelling of "opossom".Living 20 miles west of Possum Trot Kentucky for ten years has skewed my spelling of the word permenently.
    Last edited by doughesson; 10-06-2008 at 12:16 PM. Reason: noticed my mistakes

  16. #16
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    SW MO
    Posts
    4,249

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by doughesson View Post
    Hey,don't knock frog's legs.They taste just like chicken.
    Possum,when prepared correctly for the table,is not killed on sight.
    You catch it in a sack and take it home to pen up and feed table scraps to for a few days first.
    Under no circumstances: DO NOT LET THE KIDS NAME THE POSSUM!
    After a few days of eating food from a controlled source,the wierd tatses from what it HAD been eating,roadkill,mice bird eggs,et cetera,et cetera,et cetera, you can cook it up using any pork recipes because opossum tases just like pork.
    I don't know about the chicken thing, but there's not a thing wrong with them. We used to have an annual meal/party that featured frog legs and mountain oysters. Fire up the turkey fryers and get the beer batter mixed up, then dip whatever critter you have into the batter, fry it, drink beer, and eat.

    I got to looking through an old cookbook of my grandma's the other day and saw recipes for coon and possum. She said coon's not a bad meal, but the possum was too greasy.

  17. #17
    Forum Member
    firecat1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Betwixt here and there.
    Posts
    3,478

    Default

    Frog's legs are fine, I don't mind squirrel or rabbit except that there's just not enough meat on 'em, but NO MOUNTAIN OYSTERS PLEASE!!!

  18. #18
    Forum Member
    frenchfireball's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    lyon,france
    Posts
    1,033

    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by firecat1 View Post
    Frog's legs are fine, I don't mind squirrel or rabbit except that there's just not enough meat on 'em, but NO MOUNTAIN OYSTERS PLEASE!!!
    you like frog's legs?surprising. i eat some,that is ok,not my favorite food.

    as for cooking and some difficult expressions we use:"en papillotte" for example that makes the recipes better,lol.
    "sauver ou périr"

    "courage et dévouement"

    2 french mottoes in french fire service.

  19. #19
    Forum Member
    firecat1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Betwixt here and there.
    Posts
    3,478

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by frenchfireball View Post
    you like frog's legs?surprising. i eat some,that is ok,not my favorite food.

    as for cooking and some difficult expressions we use:"en papillotte" for example that makes the recipes better,lol.
    Only if the legs are fixed right, French, which means southern fried! Glad to see ya on the board!

  20. #20
    Forum Member
    frenchfireball's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    lyon,france
    Posts
    1,033

    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by firecat1 View Post
    Only if the legs are fixed right, French, which means southern fried! Glad to see ya on the board!
    ok,i see what you mean.

    thanks for the welcome back.
    "sauver ou périr"

    "courage et dévouement"

    2 french mottoes in french fire service.

  21. #21
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Memphis Tn,USA-now
    Posts
    5,436

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MalahatTwo7 View Post
    Frig'n French. Why can't THEY keep it simple and just "In a paper bag" and be done with it? LOL

    Or do like Jeff Foxworthy:"Last night Ol' Eric here fixed us a-what was it?- a goat cheese lavage salad.To be perfectly honest,we couldn't eat it but we poured a can of Hormel chili on it and ate it right up......"

  22. #22
    Forum Member
    frenchfireball's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    lyon,france
    Posts
    1,033

    Wink

    "en papillote "does not mean in a paper bag.it means that you put your food in aluminium paper and then,your food are cooked without any bad greases:butter,gravy.....

    if you use this way of cooking,"en papillotte",i highly suggest you to put some spices on your food cause without that,it will be not tasty at all,lol.
    "sauver ou périr"

    "courage et dévouement"

    2 french mottoes in french fire service.

  23. #23
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Memphis Tn,USA-now
    Posts
    5,436

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by frenchfireball View Post
    "en papillote "does not mean in a paper bag.it means that you put your food in aluminium paper and then,your food are cooked without any bad greases:butter,gravy.....

    if you use this way of cooking,"en papillotte",i highly suggest you to put some spices on your food cause without that,it will be not tasty at all,lol.
    "It's Shake 'n Bake! An' Ahh hayulped!"

  24. #24
    Forum Member
    frenchfireball's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    lyon,france
    Posts
    1,033

    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by doughesson View Post
    "It's Shake 'n Bake! An' Ahh hayulped!"
    oh ok,i can speak french and english too:j'ai tout compris,lol.
    Last edited by frenchfireball; 10-08-2008 at 05:26 AM.
    "sauver ou périr"

    "courage et dévouement"

    2 french mottoes in french fire service.

  25. #25
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Memphis Tn,USA-now
    Posts
    5,436

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by frenchfireball View Post
    oh ok,i can speak french and english too:j'ai tout compris,lol.
    Not digging at you,fireball.Just resurrecting an old commercial.Growing up in the South during the late 60's early 70's you could not watch TV more than 10 minutes without this commercial coming on with two kids screaming in deep,deep Southern accents that they wanted to help fix the chicken because it was so easy using "Shake 'n Bake".
    I could not listen to the girlfriend I had when I was 16 without thinking of that commercial.I can tell that story now.Wendy did NOT like it.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Meals Deduction
    By JFDRookie in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 03-20-2007, 03:30 PM
  2. Meals at the Firehouse
    By Turk II in forum Volunteer Forum
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 12-27-2001, 05:42 PM
  3. Meals in the Firehouse... besides chili.
    By E_man9RFD in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 03-07-2001, 02:13 PM
  4. Meals at the station
    By Romania in forum Career/Paid Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: 01-18-2000, 03:54 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Log in

Click here to log in or register