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  1. #1
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    Default LZ Procedures in your dept.

    Can anyone share with me your dept's policy or basic procedures when landing a helicopter? I am bascially looking for PPE requirements, who or what apparatus is assigned and any equipment deployment requirements. They are looking to revamp our policy and I would like to hear what everyone else is doing so my input is relevant and researched.

    Thanks

    LT/PM
    SWFL


  2. #2
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    We dispatch an engine to all LZ's, except the landing pad at the hospital. The main purpose is to make sure the LZ is clear of hazards (power lines, FOD, fences, etc) and keep people away. Also provide manpower as necessary. Secondary is the just in case of accident, although very few of us are trained in that type of rescue.

    As far as PPE, everybody in full PPE, with at least 2 bottled up except for masks and not on air. Personally, I try to position the engine so the pump panel is on the opposite side of where the helo will land and keep everybody behind the engine until it's on the ground.

  3. #3
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    We send an engine to secure an LZ and to communicate w/ the helo coming in. PD generally sends a unit to assist w/o us requesting it if they're available and they're good about sending more if we ask. We require bunker gear and some COs ask their crews to put on their air pack, their discretion. We don't put any hose on the ground. It is far more likely in the evet of something happening that we're going to have to relocate. Our SOG also gives LZ size requirements, basically we took what the air ambulance services in our area wanted in regards to an LZ and put in our SOG. All of our engines use the strobe kits for marking an LZ. I dunno if the helos really use them but it's part of the SOG. On a side note, those strobes are GREAT for marking exits if you get a large commercial job or a building with a strange/confusing layout. When we get one we just turn them on and placed them inside the exits.

    One other thing we did was we preplanned our LZs. We're a typical small town and we can't land a helo just anywhere. We compiled a list of places that will provide a good LZ and put a list of about 12 in the SOG. The IC still has the discretion to use a different LZ but at least it gives them a place to start.
    I may speak gibberish, but I don't talk s***! -- Dropkick Murphys

  4. #4
    Forum Member TNFF319's Avatar
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    We send an engine to all LZs. We are suppose to be in full be in full ppe.Landing zone is 100ft.X100ft. daytime and 200X200 at night.
    FF/Paramedic

  5. #5
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    Engine company with a minimum staffing of 4.

    One with his SCBA close for the WORST CASE SCENARIO (most of us are ARFF trained)

    The other three or four have to have at least thier turnout pants on and a safety vest. On approach the LZ members will be instructed by the pilot and crew to have a member outside the square to protect the tail rotor.

    100x100 square done with white LED or Strobe units with a 5th one being RED for the windward side. The fire engine will also have it's emergency lights on at ALL times.

    If it's on the road a series of yellow and lime pop up cones and flares will be used to shut the road down in the event that the PD isn't there to do soo.
    Last edited by CooterRob; 11-21-2008 at 11:20 AM.
    "I don't wanna hear about it... I wanna see results!!!":-P

  6. #6
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    High Country Fire-Rescue
    Standard Operating Guideline # 08-03 approved:_____________________ ___________
    Landing Zones

    OVERVIEW: EMERGENCY MEDICAL TRANSPORTATION

    1.) Med-Evac helicopters are capable of carrying only one Immediate patient. Additional helicopters should be requested for incidents involving multiple Immediate patients. These aircraft are not approved for Technical Rescue air operations.

    2.) DPS helicopters are capable of carrying one patient only. DPS helicopter pilots must be advised of a litter patient prior to taking off or landing so that the interior of the helicopter can be put in proper configuration to accommodate the patient. DPS can perform "short-haul" rescues.

    3.) Helicopter transportation should be considered for Immediate trauma patients requiring urgent surgery, patients requiring specialized treatment (OB, pediatric, burns, neurological) or any other patient Medical Control deems necessary.

    COMMUNICATIONS
    1.) Air-to-ground radio communications shall be used whenever possible to give landing zone instructions, weather conditions, patient information and to identify hazard locations to approaching helicopters. Use Mutual Aid frequency 154.280 mhz on your radio. If you are using Mutual Aid channel for on-scene operations, have ground units switch frequencies before helicopter arrival.

    2.) Helicopters may be directed to land via hand or light signals when radio communication proves unfeasible. Landings shall not be made in proximity to the incident without positive contact (radios or hand signals).

    LANDING ZONES

    The selection of an appropriate landing zone is of critical importance in all field situations. A suitable landing area must be located and identified for the pilot.

    1.) The landing zone must be relatively flat and free of obstructions for an area of at least 100' x 100' for each helicopter.
    2.) All spectators, vehicle traffic (including emergency vehicles) and animals must be kept a minimum of 200' away from the landing zone.
    3.) The individual communicating with the pilot shall stand at the front right corner (as seen by the pilot) of the touch down area.
    4.) A visual check should be made for overhead wires, poles, towers, and similar obstructions. Any obstructions noted must be communicated to the pilot before he is committed. The pilot can then assess the obstruction.
    5.) The approach and departure paths (into the wind) must be free of obstructions. For heavily loaded helicopters (i.e., water drop), the clear path should extend at least 100 yards in each direction.
    6.) Approach and departure paths should not pass over a treatment area, command post, or other activity areas where noise and rotor wash will cause problems.
    7.) The landing zone should be located at least 100 yards from other activity areas.
    8.) The landing zone and surrounding area must be free of small objects which can be blown around by rotor wash. Check for metal objects and secure loose clothing or blankets.
    9.) Avoid dusty locations if possible. If the landing area is dusty, wet down the area with a hose line before landing. Save at least half the engines water tank capacity to

    HCFR Tactical Guideline, Landing Zones. Contíd.

    deal with on scene emergencies.
    10.) Use red strobes day and night to mark the location of the LZ for the pilot. The LZ kit is in Rescue 1.
    11.) Use of predetermined LZs is recommended. "Espee Road" LZ is located three- tenths of a mile west of the hwy 64/ Espee Rd junction.
    12.) HCFR will attempt to minimize the disruption to traffic as much as possible by keeping lanes free from apparatus and allowing lanes to open up as quickly as possible but will not allow unsafe practices.
    13.) GPS coordinates are to be given in "degrees-minutes" where the latitude and longitude (datum-WGS 87) are expressed as " 31 degrees, 14.75 minutes" (seconds are not used but are expressed as a decimal). When giving coordinates it is not necessary to give the ".75", only the "31 degrees, 14 minutes". Be prepared to give these to dispatch for relay to the responding aircraft at the time the aircraft is requested.
    14.) HCFR apparatus used to provide a physical barrier to traffic intrusion into the LZ will have all code lights running and set to "high idle".
    15.) HCFR apparatus will be positioned to allow for rapid blocking/unblocking of traffic without having to move or adjust position unnecessarily.

    Once a helicopter has landed the pilot may elect to shut down for added safety in the landing zone.

    Radio contact and the landing zone shall be maintained for two to three minutes after departure of the helicopter in case an in-flight emergency is experienced and the helicopter needs to return to the landing zone.

    Task: MARSHALLING THE LZ
    ( LZ Sector, a command function, answers to IC )
    call sign: "High Country LZ"
    radio channel: "Mutual Aid"

    Command will designate a qualified individual to marshall the aircraft. This "LZ Sector" will use the call sign "High Country LZ" with the incoming aircraft. This individual will not perform other duties while acting as "High Country LZ".

    This member:

    1.) Will have completed the LZ class given by HCFR.
    2.) Will have selected an appropriate area and prepared an LZ using the above criteria.
    3.) Will be properly identified with PPE and helmet with eye protection.
    4.) Will have radio communication with helicopter. Before they land and 2-3 minutes after they clear the LZ.
    5.) Will work with visual signals with "Fire Control" or radio communication with "Tail Rotor Guard".
    6.) Will advise Command when to block traffic. At the LZ Sector's discretion, about 2 minutes before the aircraft arrives on scene. Command will order traffic stopped and apparatus to block roads
    7.) Will lead fire suppression efforts in the event of an emergency.

    Should anything become unsafe during the approach of any helicopter during landing operations LZ Sector will instruct the pilot to "GO AROUND, GO AROUND, GO AROUND" using that phrase.


    HCFR Tactical Guidelines, Landing Zones. Contíd.

    Task: FIRE CONTROL AT THE LZ
    ( answers to LZ Sector )
    call sign: "Fire Control"
    radio channel: Command channel

    Command will designate a qualified individual to provide fire control in the event of an emergency. This member can also wet down the LZ if dry, dusty conditions are present.

    This member:

    1.) Will wear full structural PPE with helmet and eye protection.
    2.) Will ensure that at least a half-tank of water is present in the engine water tank for use in an emergency.
    3.) Should not wear SCBA in anticipation of an emergency. In flight emergencies usually occur while the aircraft is landing or taking off, rapid movement of the fire apparatus to the actual sight of the emergency might be hampered by SCBA use. In the event of an emergency, the SCBA Guideline will be observed.
    4.) Should not leave a hose line deployed after wetting operations for the same reason. If possible use a "Jump Line" or "Booster Line" for wetting the LZ and stow it on the engine after wetting is completed and before aircraft arrives.
    5.) Will maintain radio contact with Command and avoid the temptation to "eavesdrop" on conversations with pilot.
    6.) Will move apparatus into place to block traffic when directed by LZ Sector/Command.
    6.) Will notify Command of an accident or emergency involving the aircraft.
    7.) Will act as fire suppression in the event of an emergency.

    TAIL ROTOR GUARD
    ( answers to LZ Sector )
    call sign: "Tail Rotor Guard"
    radio channel: Mutual Aid

    Command will designate a qualified individual to act as "tail rotor guard".

    This member:

    1.) Will have completed the LZ class given by HCFR.
    2.) Will be properly identified with PPE and helmet with eye protection.
    3.) Will have radio communication with LZ Sector. This is the same channel as the pilot and "High Country LZ" are on. avoid the temptation to chatter unless necessary for the safety of the aircraft or ground personnel.
    4.) Will position themselves 50 to 100 feet from the rear of the aircraft only after the aircraft has touched down. Will leave the area when rotor pitch changes indicating aircraft is lifting off.
    5.) Will provide a physical barrier to any civilian or ground personnel approaching the aircraft from the danger area.
    6.) Will continuously monitor for approaching traffic in a 360 degree area.
    7.) Will act as fire suppression in the event of an emergency.





    HCFR Tactical Guidelines, Landing Zones. Contíd.

    Task: TRAFFIC CONTROL
    (Two positions, answers to Command )
    call sign: "Traffic Control East" "Traffic Control North", etc..
    radio channel: Command channel, or other channel except Mutual Aid

    Command will designate qualified individuals to provide traffic direction at each end of the LZ.

    These members:

    1.) Will be properly identified with vest/PPE and helmet with eye protection.
    2.) Will be qualified to drive department apparatus to block traffic.
    3.) Will maintain radio contact with the Traffic Controller at the opposite end of the LZ. This can be the Command channel.
    4.) Will coordinate the flow of traffic through the LZ with the Traffic Controller at the opposite end of the LZ.
    5.) Will move apparatus into place to block traffic when directed by LZ Sector/Command.


    HELICOPTER SAFETY FACTORS

    * Approach and depart helicopter from the front or 45 degrees from the front, in a crouching position; remain in view of the pilot.
    * Establish eye contact with pilot or observer before approaching if rotors are moving.
    * Do not approach helicopter after landing until pilot or observer signals approval to approach aircraft.
    * Approach and depart in pilot's or observer's field of vision (never towards the tail rotor).
    * At no time will personnel approach the tail area of any helicopter.
    * Landing zone personnel shall use eye protection or helmet face shields and ear protection. Helmet chin straps shall be tightened securely.
    * Use a chin-strap or secure hard hat when working around main rotor.
    * Keep landing areas clear of loose articles that may "fly" in the rotor down wash.
    * Provide wind indicators for take-off and landings; back to the wind, arms extended in front of body.
    * Beware of rotor wash. Small objects and clothing (caps, jackets, etc.) can be blown around easily. Do not grab or chase articles blown off by the rotor wash.
    * Be aware the spotlights used to illuminate obstructions can blind the pilot. Extreme caution should be used. Only use spotlights to illuminate the bottom of poles. Do not shine upward.
    * Carry tools horizontally and below waist level, never upright or over shoulder.
    * Secure items internally and externally on the helicopter.
    * Provide pilot with accurate weights and types of baggage.
    * Stage patients waiting to be loaded at least 150 feet away. Secure sheets and blankets and cover eyes during landing.
    * Do not open or close aircraft doors, allow flight crew to do so.

    RIDING IN HELICOPTER
    * Fasten seat belt upon entering helicopter and leave buckled until pilot signals to exit. Fasten seat belt behind you before leaving.
    * Use the door latches as instructed; caution should be exercised around moving parts or Plexiglas.
    * Do not throw items from the helicopter.


    PPE

    All fire personnel and crew members will wear the following PPE when operating in or on the helicopter.

    Fire Resistant Clothing: Nomex jumpsuit or structural fire fighting coat and pants. Brush firefighters may wear FR pants and nomex brush jacket.

    Helmets with eye protection is mandatory on any LZ.

    During nighttime operations a helmet light and/or hand light secured to PPE should be left on. Lightsticks or LED personnel marking lights affixed to the back of the helmet are recommended.

    If PPE not required for a particular LZ task (Command, EMT or Traffic Control) a minimum of helmet and reflective vest are required.

    SURFACE SELECTION
    In order of preference

    1. Concrete
    2. Asphalt
    3. Grass
    4. Compacted dirt (lightly moistened to control dust)
    5. Dry, loose dirt/sand (heavily moistened to control dust)





    ______________________________ ______Chiefís Signature, Date.

  7. #7
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    The fire engine will also have it's emergency lights on at ALL times.
    Interesting difference. The SOP here has been to turn out all lights, especially emergency lights, especially at night. The flashing light affect the pilots night vision and make it harder for him to see instruments and outside the cockpit at night.

  8. #8
    Forum Member CooterRob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eng34FF View Post
    Interesting difference. The SOP here has been to turn out all lights, especially emergency lights, especially at night. The flashing light affect the pilots night vision and make it harder for him to see instruments and outside the cockpit at night.
    That's debatable here... but I do agree with you.... our rig is usually parked far enough away that none of the pilots here have had an issue.
    "I don't wanna hear about it... I wanna see results!!!":-P

  9. #9
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    High Country Fire-Rescue
    Standard Operating Guideline # 08-03 approved:_____________________ ___________
    Landing Zones

    OVERVIEW: EMERGENCY MEDICAL TRANSPORTATION

    1.) Med-Evac helicopters are capable of carrying only one Immediate patient. Additional helicopters should be requested for incidents involving multiple Immediate patients. These aircraft are not approved for Technical Rescue air operations.

    2.) DPS helicopters are capable of carrying one patient only. DPS helicopter pilots must be advised of a litter patient prior to taking off or landing so that the interior of the helicopter can be put in proper configuration to accommodate the patient. DPS can perform "short-haul" rescues.

    3.) Helicopter transportation should be considered for Immediate trauma patients requiring urgent surgery, patients requiring specialized treatment (OB, pediatric, burns, neurological) or any other patient Medical Control deems necessary.

    COMMUNICATIONS
    1.) Air-to-ground radio communications shall be used whenever possible to give landing zone instructions, weather conditions, patient information and to identify hazard locations to approaching helicopters. Use Mutual Aid frequency 154.280 mhz on your radio. If you are using Mutual Aid channel for on-scene operations, have ground units switch frequencies before helicopter arrival.

    2.) Helicopters may be directed to land via hand or light signals when radio communication proves unfeasible. Landings shall not be made in proximity to the incident without positive contact (radios or hand signals).

    LANDING ZONES

    The selection of an appropriate landing zone is of critical importance in all field situations. A suitable landing area must be located and identified for the pilot.

    1.) The landing zone must be relatively flat and free of obstructions for an area of at least 100' x 100' for each helicopter.
    2.) All spectators, vehicle traffic (including emergency vehicles) and animals must be kept a minimum of 200' away from the landing zone.
    3.) The individual communicating with the pilot shall stand at the front right corner (as seen by the pilot) of the touch down area.
    4.) A visual check should be made for overhead wires, poles, towers, and similar obstructions. Any obstructions noted must be communicated to the pilot before he is committed. The pilot can then assess the obstruction.
    5.) The approach and departure paths (into the wind) must be free of obstructions. For heavily loaded helicopters (i.e., water drop), the clear path should extend at least 100 yards in each direction.
    6.) Approach and departure paths should not pass over a treatment area, command post, or other activity areas where noise and rotor wash will cause problems.
    7.) The landing zone should be located at least 100 yards from other activity areas.
    8.) The landing zone and surrounding area must be free of small objects which can be blown around by rotor wash. Check for metal objects and secure loose clothing or blankets.
    9.) Avoid dusty locations if possible. If the landing area is dusty, wet down the area with a hose line before landing. Save at least half the engines water tank capacity to

    HCFR Tactical Guideline, Landing Zones. Contíd.

    deal with on scene emergencies.
    10.) Use red strobes day and night to mark the location of the LZ for the pilot. The LZ kit is in Rescue 1.
    11.) Use of predetermined LZs is recommended. "Espee Road" LZ is located three- tenths of a mile west of the hwy 64/ Espee Rd junction.
    12.) HCFR will attempt to minimize the disruption to traffic as much as possible by keeping lanes free from apparatus and allowing lanes to open up as quickly as possible but will not allow unsafe practices.
    13.) GPS coordinates are to be given in "degrees-minutes" where the latitude and longitude (datum-WGS 87) are expressed as " 31 degrees, 14.75 minutes" (seconds are not used but are expressed as a decimal). When giving coordinates it is not necessary to give the ".75", only the "31 degrees, 14 minutes". Be prepared to give these to dispatch for relay to the responding aircraft at the time the aircraft is requested.
    14.) HCFR apparatus used to provide a physical barrier to traffic intrusion into the LZ will have all code lights running and set to "high idle".
    15.) HCFR apparatus will be positioned to allow for rapid blocking/unblocking of traffic without having to move or adjust position unnecessarily.

    Once a helicopter has landed the pilot may elect to shut down for added safety in the landing zone.

    Radio contact and the landing zone shall be maintained for two to three minutes after departure of the helicopter in case an in-flight emergency is experienced and the helicopter needs to return to the landing zone.

    Task: MARSHALLING THE LZ
    ( LZ Sector, a command function, answers to IC )
    call sign: "High Country LZ"
    radio channel: "Mutual Aid"

    Command will designate a qualified individual to marshall the aircraft. This "LZ Sector" will use the call sign "High Country LZ" with the incoming aircraft. This individual will not perform other duties while acting as "High Country LZ".

    This member:

    1.) Will have completed the LZ class given by HCFR.
    2.) Will have selected an appropriate area and prepared an LZ using the above criteria.
    3.) Will be properly identified with PPE and helmet with eye protection.
    4.) Will have radio communication with helicopter. Before they land and 2-3 minutes after they clear the LZ.
    5.) Will work with visual signals with "Fire Control" or radio communication with "Tail Rotor Guard".
    6.) Will advise Command when to block traffic. At the LZ Sector's discretion, about 2 minutes before the aircraft arrives on scene. Command will order traffic stopped and apparatus to block roads
    7.) Will lead fire suppression efforts in the event of an emergency.

    Should anything become unsafe during the approach of any helicopter during landing operations LZ Sector will instruct the pilot to "GO AROUND, GO AROUND, GO AROUND" using that phrase.


    HCFR Tactical Guidelines, Landing Zones. Contíd.

    Task: FIRE CONTROL AT THE LZ
    ( answers to LZ Sector )
    call sign: "Fire Control"
    radio channel: Command channel

    Command will designate a qualified individual to provide fire control in the event of an emergency. This member can also wet down the LZ if dry, dusty conditions are present.

    This member:

    1.) Will wear full structural PPE with helmet and eye protection.
    2.) Will ensure that at least a half-tank of water is present in the engine water tank for use in an emergency.
    3.) Should not wear SCBA in anticipation of an emergency. In flight emergencies usually occur while the aircraft is landing or taking off, rapid movement of the fire apparatus to the actual sight of the emergency might be hampered by SCBA use. In the event of an emergency, the SCBA Guideline will be observed.
    4.) Should not leave a hose line deployed after wetting operations for the same reason. If possible use a "Jump Line" or "Booster Line" for wetting the LZ and stow it on the engine after wetting is completed and before aircraft arrives.
    5.) Will maintain radio contact with Command and avoid the temptation to "eavesdrop" on conversations with pilot.
    6.) Will move apparatus into place to block traffic when directed by LZ Sector/Command.
    6.) Will notify Command of an accident or emergency involving the aircraft.
    7.) Will act as fire suppression in the event of an emergency.

    TAIL ROTOR GUARD
    ( answers to LZ Sector )
    call sign: "Tail Rotor Guard"
    radio channel: Mutual Aid

    Command will designate a qualified individual to act as "tail rotor guard".

    This member:

    1.) Will have completed the LZ class given by HCFR.
    2.) Will be properly identified with PPE and helmet with eye protection.
    3.) Will have radio communication with LZ Sector. This is the same channel as the pilot and "High Country LZ" are on. avoid the temptation to chatter unless necessary for the safety of the aircraft or ground personnel.
    4.) Will position themselves 50 to 100 feet from the rear of the aircraft only after the aircraft has touched down. Will leave the area when rotor pitch changes indicating aircraft is lifting off.
    5.) Will provide a physical barrier to any civilian or ground personnel approaching the aircraft from the danger area.
    6.) Will continuously monitor for approaching traffic in a 360 degree area.
    7.) Will act as fire suppression in the event of an emergency.





    HCFR Tactical Guidelines, Landing Zones. Contíd.

    Task: TRAFFIC CONTROL
    (Two positions, answers to Command )
    call sign: "Traffic Control East" "Traffic Control North", etc..
    radio channel: Command channel, or other channel except Mutual Aid

    Command will designate qualified individuals to provide traffic direction at each end of the LZ.

    These members:

    1.) Will be properly identified with vest/PPE and helmet with eye protection.
    2.) Will be qualified to drive department apparatus to block traffic.
    3.) Will maintain radio contact with the Traffic Controller at the opposite end of the LZ. This can be the Command channel.
    4.) Will coordinate the flow of traffic through the LZ with the Traffic Controller at the opposite end of the LZ.
    5.) Will move apparatus into place to block traffic when directed by LZ Sector/Command.


    HELICOPTER SAFETY FACTORS

    * Approach and depart helicopter from the front or 45 degrees from the front, in a crouching position; remain in view of the pilot.
    * Establish eye contact with pilot or observer before approaching if rotors are moving.
    * Do not approach helicopter after landing until pilot or observer signals approval to approach aircraft.
    * Approach and depart in pilot's or observer's field of vision (never towards the tail rotor).
    * At no time will personnel approach the tail area of any helicopter.
    * Landing zone personnel shall use eye protection or helmet face shields and ear protection. Helmet chin straps shall be tightened securely.
    * Use a chin-strap or secure hard hat when working around main rotor.
    * Keep landing areas clear of loose articles that may "fly" in the rotor down wash.
    * Provide wind indicators for take-off and landings; back to the wind, arms extended in front of body.
    * Beware of rotor wash. Small objects and clothing (caps, jackets, etc.) can be blown around easily. Do not grab or chase articles blown off by the rotor wash.
    * Be aware the spotlights used to illuminate obstructions can blind the pilot. Extreme caution should be used. Only use spotlights to illuminate the bottom of poles. Do not shine upward.
    * Carry tools horizontally and below waist level, never upright or over shoulder.
    * Secure items internally and externally on the helicopter.
    * Provide pilot with accurate weights and types of baggage.
    * Stage patients waiting to be loaded at least 150 feet away. Secure sheets and blankets and cover eyes during landing.
    * Do not open or close aircraft doors, allow flight crew to do so.

    RIDING IN HELICOPTER
    * Fasten seat belt upon entering helicopter and leave buckled until pilot signals to exit. Fasten seat belt behind you before leaving.
    * Use the door latches as instructed; caution should be exercised around moving parts or Plexiglas.
    * Do not throw items from the helicopter.


    PPE

    All fire personnel and crew members will wear the following PPE when operating in or on the helicopter.

    Fire Resistant Clothing: Nomex jumpsuit or structural fire fighting coat and pants. Brush firefighters may wear FR pants and nomex brush jacket.

    Helmets with eye protection is mandatory on any LZ.

    During nighttime operations a helmet light and/or hand light secured to PPE should be left on. Lightsticks or LED personnel marking lights affixed to the back of the helmet are recommended.

    If PPE not required for a particular LZ task (Command, EMT or Traffic Control) a minimum of helmet and reflective vest are required.

    SURFACE SELECTION
    In order of preference

    1. Concrete
    2. Asphalt
    3. Grass
    4. Compacted dirt (lightly moistened to control dust)
    5. Dry, loose dirt/sand (heavily moistened to control dust)





    ______________________________ ______Chiefís Signature, Date.

  10. #10
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    We've had the local air agencies request that we not have any headlights, spotlights, scene lights, ect. pointing towards the LZ, but nothing in regard to our emergency lights.
    I may speak gibberish, but I don't talk s***! -- Dropkick Murphys

  11. #11
    Let's talk fire trucks! BoxAlarm187's Avatar
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    We follow what most of you all do. Send an engine to secure the LZ, checking for hazards for the aircraft and crew. We stage about 250'-500' away usually, and maintain communications with the aircraft. We de not deploy a hand-line.

    The air-medical services in our area request no white lights (floodlights, scene lights, headlights, warning lights) towards the LZ, but like having the red lights on as a point of reference.
    Career Fire Captain
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  12. #12
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    sorry about double post

  13. #13
    MembersZone Subscriber mcaldwell's Avatar
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    Here are some videos and some training material provided by our regonal service. There is also a field card you can use to help set up your LZ.

    http://jetvision.tv/video.aspx?videoID=452&playerID=5

    http://www.stars.ca/data/1/rec_docs/46_LZ_card.pdf

    http://www.stars.ca/data/1/rec_docs/149_STM.pdf
    Never argue with an Idiot. They drag you down to their level, and then beat you with experience!

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  14. #14
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    www.vulifeflight.com

    We send an Engine to the LZ if it is not a scene landing. Other SOP pretty much the same as those under the safety section.

  15. #15
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    We have used 4 traffic wands at the outer edge of the landing zone pointing into the middle for nightime landings. Pilots have said this is much better than the strobes. They need to be far enough out so that the rotor was does not send them flying. Some pilots want all warning lights shut down when they start making their approach. Any floodlights used for the landing zone are turned to face down towards the ground. We have numerous pre-established landing zones in the county. If at all possible these are used on all nighttime landings.

  16. #16

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    Try contacting the air ambulance service that flies in your area. Ours came out and taught a class on what they wanted and all their safety proceedures.

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