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    Default Plane down in the hudson

    Manhattan going to work at the world acht pier

    http://www.thebravest.com/manhattan/manhattan.htm

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    Seems like a few survivors being rescued.

    Be safe everyone.
    Jason Knecht
    Assistant Chief
    Altoona Fire Dept.
    Altoona, WI

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    A US Airways flight 5067, an Airbus 320 with 146 passengers and 5 crew onboard, 151 souls on board, heading for the Carolina's.

    maybe hit a flock of birds and hit the water in one piece.
    Jason Knecht
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    Altoona Fire Dept.
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    From the images in this article, it does look like a lot of people were standing on the wings. There looked like quite a few ferries, tugs, etc. swarming the plane. Crossing my fingers that everyone is OK - with luck, nothing worse than being cold with wet pants.

    Apparently, multiple witnesses claimed the plane flew through birds, but we'll see how that turns out.

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    From what I can see, this is going to be one of the biggest miracles in US aviation history. Pilot seems to be the hero.

    Usual professionalism and competence exhibited by FDNY and NYPD.
    PROUD, HONORED AND HUMBLED RECIPIENT OF THE PURPLE HYDRANT AWARD - 10/2007.

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    They say everyone made it out. What an amazing outcome.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgeWendtCFI View Post
    From what I can see, this is going to be one of the biggest miracles in US aviation history. Pilot seems to be the hero.

    Usual professionalism and competence exhibited by FDNY and NYPD.
    I think so.

    Sounds like no one got hurt, so far anyway.
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    One of the coldest days in years, and not a soul lost, at least it appears that way so far.

    Bravo FDNY, USCG, NYPD. Bravo.
    AJ, MICP, FireMedic
    Member, IACOJ.
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    http://www.thebravest.com/manhattan/manhattan.htm
    Has fallen mostly silent.

    http://www.cnn.com/video/flashLive/l...stream=stream1
    CNN's live feed. You can see it literally floating down the river.
    Last edited by ffbam24; 01-15-2009 at 05:53 PM.

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    Plane Crashes Into Hudson: "Prepare for Impact"

    Plane en route from New York to Charlotte may have struck geese
    Updated 4:21 PM EST, Thu, Jan 15, 2009

    A US Airways jet crashed landed into the Hudson River near Manhattan this afternoon, plunging its approximately 150 crew and passengers into freezing waters after apparently hitting a flock of geese.

    The plane was submerged in the icy waters up to the windows, and rescue crews had opened the door and were pulling passengers in yellow life vests from the plane. Several boats surrounded the plane, which appeared to be slowly sinking.

    An armada of boats, including at least five commuter ferries, as well as firefighters, federal officials rushed to the scene before the Airbus A320 could sink into the murky depths.

    The plane crashed in the area of The USS Intrepid, near 43rd Street, on Manhattan's West side shortly after it took off at 3:26 p.m. from LaGuardia Airport. It was unclear how many people were able to escape.

    “Prepare for impact" - all that was said by the pilot before the landed in the river according to passenger Alberto Panero in a phone interview with CNN's Wolf Blitzer.

    "Somehow the plane stayed afloat and we were all able to get on the raft," said Panero. "Some people were on the wings and had to wait there but most of the people were able to get on the raft."

    "I don't even know how to put it into words right now," he said. "I actually grabbed one of the seats, that was the first thing that came to my mind. Some people grabbed the inflatable one. Immediately there were folks coming to us and throwing life jackets to us and helping us get to safety."

    "There were a couple of people who took charge and started yelling for everyone to calm down," he said. "Once people everyone realized we were going to be ok, they settled down."

    "I can't say 100% but I'm pretty sure everyone was able to get off," he said. "It was just like a car crash, the impact."

    "I saw it hit the river," a caller who witnessed the crash told WNBC Thursday. "It just came crashing down into the river. I was wondering why it came down so low; there's no airport around here."

    Ferry boats surround a US Airways aircraft that has gone down in the Hudson River in New York, Thursday Jan. 15, 2009. It was not immediately clear if there were injuries.
    WNBC's Tim Minton said a pilot had reported he'd hit a flock of geese. One report said the geese may have disabled two of the engines.

    The plane was en route to Charlotte, N.C., and had 146 passengers and five crew members aboard.

    "I'm on the 27th floor of my building, sitting on my couch," another viewer told WNBC. "I got up and said, 'Oh my God, they're gonna land in the river.' I watched the whole thing."

    "I saw what appeared to be a tail fin of a plane sticking out of the water," said Erica Schietinger, whose office windows at Chelsea Piers look out over the Hudson. "All the boats have sort of circled the area. ... I can't tell what's what at this point."

    Experts said that Canadian geese are one of a pilots worst nightmares.

    A 4-pound bird exerts more than 6 tons of force if hit by a plane traveling 200 mph -- some geese weigh up to 15 pounds.

    A U.S. Air Force plane crashed during takeoff at Elmendorf Air Force Base in Alaska in 1995 after a collision with geese. Twenty-four people died.

    Birds caused another Air Force plane to crash during its approach to a runway in the Netherlands in 1996, killing 34 people.

    Great job to those involved!
    Attached Images Attached Images  

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    FAA confirming everyone got off the plane. One of the passengers interviewed described the landing as "surprisingly gentle", reporting only a few injuries.

    Additional props to the flight crew and passengers for an apparently orderly evacuation, and to the ferry and small boat operators who picked up passengers.

    Radio reporter saying the plane had "gone out of sight"... sunk, or floating down river?

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    Great job. A true miracle. Caught a view of ENGINE 40. Way to go CAVEMEN !
    IAFF-IACOJ PROUD

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    Glad to hear everyone is OK. Kudos to all who helped rescue those involved
    The comments made by me are my opinions only. They DO NOT reflect the opinions of my employer(s). If you have an issue with something I may say, take it up with me, either by posting in the forums, emailing me through my profile, or PMing me through my profile.
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    amazing job by the pilot.... I thought I would be seeing debris and fuel oil everywhere, but it looks totally intact.
    Ny and Jersey Brothers... you did a great job!

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    Well if there was ever an award or medal for airline pilots/crew, this would be a good time. Fantastic job landing that plane. So many things could have gone wrong and yet apparently everything went fine.

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    That was an extraordinary example of flying when the goose poop hit the oscillation of the A320's two turbofan engines...

    A job well done and a tip of the leather to the flight crews of US Airways flight 1549 and the responding agencies... FDNY, NYPD, PAPD, the ferry lines and the Coast Guard.

    PS: I think he flight crew should get a seaplane rating from the FAA!
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
    Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

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    Nice work Aircrew, FDNY, NYPD, CG, etal

    That wasn't a miracle, it was the confluence of training, experience, hard-work, and good decision making. Nice Work!

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    Hudson River between NY and NJ, 1/15/09

    Location: Hudson River @ W50 st

    15:34 hours
    Phone Box 868 - Report of a plane in the water
    Engs. 54, 34, 65
    TL21, L4
    Battalions 9, Rescue
    Rescue 1
    Squad 18
    Tactical Support 1
    Marine 1 Alpha

    15:35 hours
    Also receiving reports of plane in the water @ Hudson River @ W83 st. Multiple calls received in the Bronx reporting a plane with engine fire. Queens in contact with LGA tower reporting a plane with a bird into the engine.
    E76, TL22 assigned to W83 st

    15:36 hours
    Rescue 1 to Manhattan, urgent! Plane in the water with people out, we're launching our boat!
    E23 available assigned in

    15:37 hours
    Rescue Battalion: Start a second rescue.
    Rescue 4 S/C

    15:37 hours
    Battalion 9: Have all units respond to the Intrepid, that's where Rescue 1 is.

    10-60-868 - 15:38 hours
    Battalion 9 to Manhattan, Urgent! According to PD we have a major airliner in the water, possibly a 707, give me a 10-60!
    Engs. 8, 21, 40, 16
    E9 w/ Satellite 1, E93 w/ Mobile Command Center 2
    L2, L16
    TL35 is the FAST truck
    L25 w/ Collapse Rescue 1, Collapse Rescue 4
    TL7, TL1 (SOC Support Trucks)
    Battalions 10. 11, HazMat, Safety, Marine
    Battalion 6 (Safety Officer), Battalion 8 (Resource Unit Leader)
    Battalion 4 (Planning Sections Chief), Battalion 58 (Air-Recon Chief)
    Squad 1 w/ TRV, HazMat 1, SOC Logistics, SOC Compressor
    Divisions 1, 3
    Marines 1, 6
    FieldCom, Command Tactical Unit
    RAC1
    Car 36B (Department Chaplain)

    15:38 hours
    TL21 to Manhattan, Urgent! The location of the plane is 43 and West Side!

    15:39 hours
    Marine 1 to Manhattan, this is confirmed! You have a commercial airliner in the water, 2 ferries alongside, Marine 1A is pulling up alongside, Marine 1 is responding as well.

    15:40 hours
    BC9 to Manhattan, Urgent! We have a commercial airliner down, have all units respond to Circle Line Piers, we have people on the wings, we have a Circle Line Boat pushing it to the pier.

    15:42 hours
    BC9: We're going to use the Command Post at the end of Pier 83

    15:43 hours
    Division 1: Have All-Units respond into 42 st, Pier 81.

    15:44 hours
    Marine 1: Tide is moving downtown.

    15:46 hours
    DC1: At this time, we have an FD command post set up at Pier 81 opposite 41 and 12th. We have a US Airway Jet, approximately 60 passenger Jet, we have Circle Line ferries circling the plane, it is drifting south at this time, right now south of 41st and 12th.

    15:46 hours
    DC1 to Manhattan, Urgent! I want all the Marine Units responding on this incident! At this time we have numerous people on the wings on the plane, we have numerous Circle Line ferries surrounding the plane, FD units are jumping on additional ferries.
    Marine 9 w/ Rescue 5, E153, TL77, Battalion 21 S/C

    15:47 hours
    DC1: Have Division 3 set up a secondary command post at the tip of Pier 76 (W36 st)

    15:48 hours
    Car 4A (AC Robert Sweeney, Assistant Chief of Operations) is responding.

    15:49 hours
    DC1: We want FD units to respond to Pier 76, all command units respond to Pier 81

    15:50 hours
    Battalion 6 is 10-84, already designated the Resource Unit Leader, Battalion 8 re-designated the Safety Officer.

    15:51 hours
    DC1: We want a Major EMS response to both Piers. First boat loaded with passengers is heading to Pier 81. We have reports of 146 passengers on the plane.

    15:52 hours
    Coast Gaurd reports 4 ferries and 1 cutter en-route

    15:53 hours
    Car 4A: Notify Division 1 as per FDOC there are 146 Passengers and 5 crew, total of 151.

    15:54 hours
    E14: Notify Division 1 we're at the 33st Heliport, they're directly opposite us now, it's a perfect place to land boats.
    E14 assigned

    15:56 hours
    Car 9 (DAC John Sudnik, Queens Borough Commander) is responding to DC3 command post
    Car 11(DAC William Siegel, Chief of SOC) is responding

    15:59 hours
    L10 acting 24, as per Division 3, we'll be operating at W33 at the Heliport
    Battalion 1 acting 9 S/C to the 30th street Heliport
    E1 S/C to 30th street Heliport

    16:00 hours
    Rescue 3 is relocating to Rescue 1

    16:03 hours
    L25 w/ Collapse Rescue 1 is responding to 41 and 12th
    L116 w/ Collapse Rescue 4 is responding to Pier 76

    16:03 hours
    DC1: Have all Chief officers switch over to command channel 2.

    16:03 hours
    FDOC reports plane took off with 21800 Gallons of Fuel

    16:04 hours
    Marine 9 has a 30 minute ETA responding with Rescue 5

    16:05 hours
    Car 9: Have TL35 respond to with their water gear 41st and 12th, also special call another FAST truck to 36th and 12th.
    Marine 6A is responding
    TL22 acting 12 S/C as an additional FAST Truck

    16:06 hours
    Car 11A (DC William Seelig, Chief of Rescue Operations): We're responding to your 10-60, advise the Chief of Rescue Services the Scuba Support Van is responding from Fort Totten.

    16:09 hours
    E9: We're at 40 and 12th, pier 79, we have approximately 30 people here no one seriously injured, if we can get some blankets over, everyone's soaking wet.

    16:10 hours
    Car 12 (BC Stephen Raynis (Acting), Chief of Safety and Inspectional Services) is responding

    16:11 hours
    The staging area is W42 st and 11 ave

    16:13 hours
    Marine Battalion: Marine 1 and Marine 6 have lashed the plane to ensure the remaining fuel and engine do not break away, notify Coast Guard.

    16:13 hours
    Car 12A (Executive Officer of Safety and Inspectional Services) is 10-84

    16:15 hours
    Car 11A: Have the SOC Scuba Van respond to 42 and 12th

    16:15 hours
    SOC Scuba Support Van: Be advised we have 5 confirmed divers on board at this moment.

    16:18 hours
    BC1 acting 9: We're at the Chelsea Pier. We're with Division 1, we're at the end of the Chelsea Pier at the Command Post at Pier 61

    16:20 hours
    FieldCom: As per DC1, the pilot stated he got all the people off the plane onto the wings, and the pilot was dropped off at Pier 76. At this time we are attempting to ascertain the number of people and injuries. As per the pilot there is noone left on the plane.
    BC1/9: There is noone operating at the heliport, the plane has drifted south of that area.

    16:21 hours
    FC: Have the Planning Unit respond to W41 st and 12th
    E262 w/ IMT Planning Vehicle is responding
    L116 (Rescue Collapse 4 support) is responding.

    16:23 hours
    Battalion 58 is airborne with a 5 minute ETA

    16L23 hours
    DC1: Be advised Division 1's command post is now at Pier 61 (23 st @ West Side Highway)

    16:24 hours
    Division 6 is relocating to Division 3

    16:27 hours
    Manhattan requesting a rundown of which company is at which location

    16:26 hours
    DC3: At this time at Pier 76, I have TL22, he'll be appointed contact at this time.

    16:27 hours
    DC1: I need an EMS supervisor to assist me at Pier 61

    16:28 hours
    Rundown for Pier 76: W36th st and 12th ave
    TL22
    Collapse Rescue 4

    16:28 hours
    Marine 9 gives a 20 minute ETA.

    16:35 hours
    DC1: We are still waiting for an EMS Supervisor at Pier 61.

    16:40 hours
    E9 is at the Waterway Building (W48 st) with approximately 54 passengers, 2 were taken to the hospital.

    16:43 hours
    Marine 9 is 10-84.

    16:45 hours
    Nassau PD and Jersey City PD reports each has a helicopter at the 30th st heliport.

    16:49 hours
    PD is requesting a representative at W34 and 12th ave

    16:49 hours
    FC: Assign another battalion chief, we're moving our command post, it's heading south.
    Battalion 46 acting 7 S/C as "PD Liaison"
    Battalion 14 acting 8 S/C as Staging Manager

    16:57 hours
    E1 is 10-8

    16:59 hours
    BC1/9: We're being directed with TL1 to respond to Pier A.

    17:10 hours
    As per news report from US Airways:
    Latest reports are that US Airways Flight 1549, an Airbus A320, flew into a bird or flock of birds and lost both engines shortly after takeoff from LaGuardia Aiport over the Bronx while en-route to Charlotte, NC. The pilot was unable to return to the airfield and instead managed to successfully crash-land in the river. All passengers are reportedly accounted for. Majority of injuries are hypothermia-related.

    17:14 hours
    DC3: Get in contact with Mobile Command, have them respond to Battery Park Pier, we have the plane tied off now. Can we also get 2 engine companies down here, we need them to stretch 2 foam lines, we're at north of Murray St, right at the pier.
    Engs. 205 acting 10, 7 S/C

    17:17 hours
    DC1: At Pier 81, we have Battalion 8 and 2 engines committed there. We have no units left at Pier 76, have Collapse Rescue 4 take up from there and head down to Battery Park City.

    17:19 hours
    L25/Collapse Rescue 1 are 10-8.
    Battalion 58 is returning to Brooklyn.

    17:24 hours
    Battalion 8: We have 14 passengers remaining at this location (Pier 81) that require transportation back to LaGuardia. We had 20 passengers, 6 transported by EMS.

    17:26 hours
    Car 9: Have E205 go to Battery Park City and just go to the water, they'll see us there.

    17:28 hours
    Car 9: The aircraft has been secured, it's being secured to the sea wall opposite Battery Park City, 2 precautionary handlines are being stretched. Division 3 will be radio contact, Car 11 will be Incident Commander

    10-86-868 - 17:33 hours
    DC3: Transmit a 10-86 (Fleuroprotein Foam Operation), we're going to need some more foam units down here.
    E5 w/ Foam 5
    E95 w/ Foam 95
    E238 w/ Foam Tender 1
    Battalion 31 (Foam Coordinator)

    17:33 hours
    DC1: I want all agencies to respond to River Terrace off of Warren St on the water.

    17:44 hours
    The NTSB advises that no FD members are to enter the plane.

    17:49 hours
    FC: Have an EMS Supervisor respond to Murray and River View Terrace.

    17:52 hours
    E9: Advise all units coming in on the 10-86 to come in on Warren as close as they can to the water.

    17:52 hours
    At this time, as per news conference with the mayor, victim tracking is still in progress. It is believed that all passengers got out and were picked up by a variety of Circle Line, FD, PD, USCG, and civilian vessels. It is believe that most were recovered to Manhattan, with some to New Jersey.

    18:04 hours
    Battalion 10: Could you 10-10 (get location of) L16, I have one of their members.

    18:08 hours
    E238: Have an ambulance respond to Murray and West St, we have an injured member!

    18:29 hours
    FC: By order os Deputy Chief Daly, all companies not at the command post are to go 10-8, with the exception of the 10-86 units, Rescue 1, Rescue Collapse, Tactical Support, Rescue Battalion

    Currently Operating @ Battery Park City:
    Engs. 7, 205 acting 10
    E9 w/ Satellite 1, E5 w/ Foam 5, E95 w/ Foam 95, E238 w/ Foam Tender 1
    L116 w/ Collapse Rescue 4
    Battalions 9, 10, 31 (Foam Coordinator), Rescue
    Divisions 1, 3
    Rescues 1
    Marines 1, 6
    Tactical Support 1
    FieldCom, Mobile Command Center 2

    At this time:
    Manhattan was already in Fallback Step III prior to this operation.
    FDNY Command Post moving to Battery Park Pier.
    Incident remains Doubtful Will Hold.
    West Side Highway is closed, FD and PD units are operating from 23 up to 50 sts. 1st avenue is also closed for emergency vehicle access.
    The plane touched down at around W50 st. FD units located it at around W43 st, and southbound tide has gradually carried it. It has now been secured at Battery Park City pier. FD is now standing by with a foam response as agencies work to secure the plane and drain remaining fuel.
    Circle Line Ferries scrambled ferries immediately nearby and picked up most of the passengers. All passengers are reportedly accounted for with mostly hypothermia-related injuries. Worst reported injury is a broken leg to a flight attendant.
    Rescue 3 has relocated to Rescue 1.

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    Bay Area pilot hailed as hero in N.Y. plane crash
    Matthew B. Stannard,Kevin Fagan, Chronicle Staff Writers

    Friday, January 16, 2009

    (01-15) 20:26 PST Danville -- A Danville pilot was catapulted to fame Thursday after saving all 155 people aboard a US Airways A320, easing the crippled plane down in the frigid Hudson River when its engines failed moments after takeoff, then helping frightened passengers to safety and checking the cabin - twice - before leaving the sinking plane himself.

    Chesley B. "Sully" Sullenberger III, 57, was hailed by New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, by New York Gov. David Paterson, by his passengers and by masses of New Yorkers as news spread of his lifesaving landing. The plane apparently blew both engines after hitting a flock of birds shortly after its 3:26 p.m. takeoff from LaGuardia Airport.

    "The captain said, 'Brace for impact because we're going down,' " passenger Jeff Kolodjay told the Associated Press.

    Passengers put their heads in their laps and started praying, Kolodjay said.

    Sullenberger contacted the tower and reported a "double bird strike" and said he needed to return to LaGuardia, said Doug Church, a spokesman for the National Air Traffic Controllers Association. He said the controller told the pilot to divert to an airport in nearby Teterboro, N.J.

    It was not clear why Sullenberger did not land at Teterboro. Church said there was no mayday call from the plane's transponder. The plane hit the water hard - another passenger told the AP it was similar to the feeling of a low-velocity rear-end car accident, hurling passengers into the seats in front of them.

    "It was intense. It was intense. You've got to give it to the pilot," Kolodjay said. "He made a hell of a landing."

    The plane landed in the 35-degree waters of the Hudson off Manhattan's 48th Street with a massive splash. Witnesses on the shore watched in shock as passengers scrambled out, quickly but orderly, and the plane began slowly sinking. Passengers waded out onto the wings as waves licked the plane's windows.

    One commuter ferry, the Thomas Jefferson of the company NY Waterway, arrived within minutes of the crash. Ferry passengers seized life vests and lines of rope and tossed them to plane passengers struggling in the freezing water as the plane drifted slowly south.

    Soon an armada of police boats, fireboats, tugboats and Coast Guard craft converged on the aircraft, and over the next hour, all 150 passengers, including at least one baby, and both pilots and all three flight attendants were transferred to the rescue boats.

    When his passengers and flight crew were out, Sullenberger walked up and down the aisle twice to make sure the plane was empty, officials said.

    "We've had a miracle on 34th Street," Paterson said at a late-afternoon news conference in Manhattan. "I believe now we've had a miracle on the Hudson."

    If a Hollywood producer called central casting in search of an actor to play a pilot in a disaster movie, he would probably wind up with somebody who looked a lot like "Sully" Sullenberger: the silver hair of experience, the trimmed mustache of precision and the kind of twinkly, fatherly eyes that lend confidence when accompanying a friendly "Welcome aboard."

    Sullenberger has decades of experience not only flying planes - first F-4s for the U.S. Air Force and since 1980 all kinds of aircraft for US Airways - but of studying and teaching others how to fly them more safely. His resume shows experience flying everything from a glider to a jumbo jet; his consulting company is named, reassuringly, Safety Reliability Methods.

    "I've heard Sully say to people that it's rare for an airline pilot to have an incident in their career," his wife, Lorraine, told CNN shortly after the crash.

    "When he called me he said, 'There's been an accident,' " she said. "At first I thought it was something minor, but then he told me the circumstances, and my body started shaking, and I rushed to get our daughters out of school."

    About two years ago, thinking about his long-term career, Sullenberger tracked down Karlene Roberts, director of the Collaborative for Catastrophic Risk Management at UC Berkeley. The outgoing pilot quickly became a visiting scholar at the center, discussing risk and safety across all kinds of industries.

    Sullenberger's scholarship ran deep, Roberts said - he has a bachelor's degree in psychology and master's degrees in industrial psychology and public administration, according to his resume - and it was that background, plus the safety standards of modern American aviation, that helped him weather the crisis, she said.

    "He's a very outgoing guy and a strong individual. I can see him doing this, I can see him taking the steps he did," she said. "He was calm and he was businesslike. That seems to be consistent with what I know."

    At the Sullenberger family's spacious two-story, tile-roofed house on Greenridge Place, the lights were dark Thursday evening as the family avoided media. At 6:30 p.m., a car rolled up with friends and one of Sullenberger's two daughters bearing several bags of In-N-Out burgers.

    Family friend Jim Walberg told reporters the family was "shocked. They're working out details of when he'll come home, and don't want to talk to the press tonight."

    He smiled, and added: "We're just very proud of him."

    Next door, family friend Jake Brown, who arrived home in his red Corvette, said with a big grin that he was not surprised his friend was an apparent hero.

    "That sounds like Sully to me," he said, shaking his head admiringly. "With his military experience and love of flying, it's what I would expect."

    Brown also said his wife talked to Sullenberger's wife early in the evening and "she was pretty traumatized - but actually I guess you'd say relieved. She was crying a little bit and probably a little stunned at the news."

    The Sullenbergers' neighborhood is typical Danville, an upscale spread of beige custom homes with vague Spanish architecture themes. The quiet wide streets were empty Thursday evening of people or much traffic. Neighbors know Sullenberger as a devoted family man, with a wife who is a fitness trainer and a daughter who is a cheerleader in the nearby middle school.

    The family participates in charity walks and raises guide dogs for the blind, neighbors said, and can be found at the annual Easter egg hunt and friendly neighborhood parties throughout the year.

    Reporters have been trolling the neighborhood and neighbors' phones have been ringing off the hook since news spread of the near-disaster. Online, Sullenberger's fame spread rapidly. A Facebook site for his fans was created within hours.

    "You are a true American hero. Your selfless acts saved the lives of all of your passengers," a woman who said she was from Pennsylvania wrote. "I am not a fan of flying on planes but if I had to I wouldn't second guess my choice of flying if you were the pilot. God bless you!"

    Asked if he would treat his friend any differently when he showed up, Brown chuckled and said, "No. But seriously, Sully is a very easygoing, calm kind of guy. I don't think this will change him at all."

    A few doors down from Sullenberger's house, Brandon Bissada and his family said Sullenberger was "one of the nicest guys on the street."

    "He's like a real friendly person, gets along with everyone," said Bissada, 13. "If he's walking down to the pool, he stops and says hi."

    Bissada said Sullenberger's family often strolls down the street with their golden retriever dog. "I knew Mr. Sullenberger was a pilot but never knew he was a hero. Wow. Right here on our street."

    This story was written by Chronicle staff writer Matthew B. Stannard based on reporting by Chronicle staff writers Kevin Fagan and Leslie Fulbright and by Chronicle news services. E-mail the writers at mstannard@sfchronicle.com and kfagan@sfchronicle.com.

    This article appeared on page A - 1 of the San Francisco Chronicle
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    Captain Sullenberger probably didn't have enough altitude to make it to Teterboro. An aircraft without power essentially becomes a glider.

    Glide ratio comes into play. Glide ratio is the distance an aircraft will travel forward, without power, for example, with a glide ratio of 10:1. an aircraft will travel 10,000 feet of horizontal (1.6 nautical miles) distance for every 1000 feet of altitude lost in the descent. Seeing that he just took off out of LaGuardia, he probabaly didn't have enough altitude to make it to Teterboro. Other factors would be the aircraft's configuration (landing gear up, flaps, etc.), headwinds, etc. The A320 has a 17:1 glide ratio

    Captain Sullenberger and his copilot did one a hell of a job.. consider the alternative of the aircraft going down over Manhattan...
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    Surprise surprise FDNY and NYPD did a great job Bravo to the pilot and crew. I never thought the death toll would be 0.
    FF/Paramedic

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    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgeWendtCFI View Post
    From what I can see, this is going to be one of the biggest miracles in US aviation history. Pilot seems to be the hero.

    Usual professionalism and competence exhibited by FDNY and NYPD.
    X2 without a doubt.
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptainGonzo View Post
    Captain Sullenberger probably didn't have enough altitude to make it to Teterboro. An aircraft without power essentially becomes a glider.

    Glide ratio comes into play. Glide ratio is the distance an aircraft will travel forward, without power, for example, with a glide ratio of 10:1. an aircraft will travel 10,000 feet of horizontal (1.6 nautical miles) distance for every 1000 feet of altitude lost in the descent. Seeing that he just took off out of LaGuardia, he probabaly didn't have enough altitude to make it to Teterboro. Other factors would be the aircraft's configuration (landing gear up, flaps, etc.), headwinds, etc. The A320 has a 17:1 glide ratio

    Captain Sullenberger and his copilot did one a hell of a job.. consider the alternative of the aircraft going down over Manhattan...
    Teterboro has some short runways, too. Not really built for that aircraft. It is a miracle that this landing worked out the way it did.
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgeWendtCFI View Post
    Teterboro has some short runways, too. Not really built for that aircraft. It is a miracle that this landing worked out the way it did.
    Another thing to consider.. without power, landing is a one shot deal.

    These are the runways at Teterboro..

    Runway's & Taxiways: The airport consists of a two-runway configuration: Runway 1-19 (North/South) is 7,000 feet long and Runway 6-24 (NE/SW) is 6,015 feet. The facility offers both visual non-precision and "all weather" precision landing capabilities. The airport is a 24-hour public use facility, although it adheres to a voluntary nightly curfew from 12:00 AM to 6:00 AM.

    Runway 6-24 is 6,015 feet long and 150 feet wide, equipped with High Intensity Runway edge Lights (HIRL). Runway 6 approach has an Instrument Landing System (ILS) and a Medium Approach Lighting System-R (MALS-R). Runway 24 approach is equipped with both VASI (Visiual Approach Slope Indicator) and REIL (Runway End Indentification Lighting) systems. Runway 6-24 underwent complete overlay and grooving in 1987.

    Runway 1-19 is 7,000 feet long and 150 feet wide, equipped with HIRL. Both runways 1 and 19 are equipped with REILS systems. Runway 1 approach is equipped with a VASI system. Runway 19 approach has an ILS. Runway 1-19 was overlaid and grooved in the summer of 2000, and included the installation of centerline and touchdown zone lighting. Runway 1 is the preferred runway for noise abatement procedures.

    The A320's runway requirement at maximum takeofff weight is 6,857 feet, which doesn't give much room for error. Depending on the fuel load and takeoff weight, they "might" have made it in to Teterboro.
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
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    Gonz...are you a pilot??

    You sure sound like you know what you are talking about. When I worked at the local airport fire department, I traded lessons for fueling/washing/parking planes. In ground school, the instructor always taught me to be thinking of "if my engine quits right now, what would I do and where would I land?"

    What you said is totally the only thing that will determine where you put down. You gotta have lift, to get lift you gotta have speed, without engines, you decend to get speed. If you don't have any altitude to begin with, you are screwed.

    Hey, the co-pilot was from Wisconsin....small town just outside of Madison, WI

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