1. #1
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    Default Bundle Loads, does anyone use them?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TJUJ0i7vCWQ

    Has anyone used this kind of load before? If so what are the pro's/con's of it? What size/length do you use it with?


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    We actually started using it for some of our attack lines a few months ago.

    100 foot 1 3/4 in a bundle load connected to 200 feet of 2 1/2 and a gated Y.

    The 2 1/2 inch is a standard hosebed lay. And the bundle load is held together with straps.

    Pull up on scene, pull the held together bundle load to the entry point. Open the straps and charge the line. The 100 feet in the bundle make it really easy to advance the line because you are not dragging that extra 100 feet of hose that you have spread out along the driveway. It just unrolls in front of the door. We noticed very little kinking as well (not any more than our old accordion lay).

    This lay seems to work pretty good for us. The best thing to do is just get some guys together and give it a try and see if it would benefit you guys
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    I have never seen or heard of this lay, anyone have any more info about it. It looks like it would be something cool to try.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ccfdblehman View Post
    I have never seen or heard of this lay, anyone have any more info about it. It looks like it would be something cool to try.
    I personally have never used it, but I found another video you may want to check out if you haven't already.


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kieu1...eature=related
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    We're not bundling the load yet, but we are switching to flaking the 2.5 inch shoulder load in a circle like that, instead of flaking it out accordion style. It pulls really well, and gets the majority of the hose closer to the entry point.

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    We bundle hose on our "apartment line." It is simply a vertical flat load strapped with a Milwaukee strap.

    I don't care for the load in the first video. Did anyone notice that as they advanced everytime the loop shrunk it kinked? To me that is simply not acceptable.
    Last edited by FyredUp; 01-19-2009 at 08:12 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FyredUp View Post
    I don't care for the load in the first video. Did anyone notice that as they advanced everytime the loop shrunk it kinked? To me that is simply not acceptable.
    I saw the same thing. I've never trained with the load though so I'd like to learn more. How about this.... To those who use the load, is there anything that you don't like about it, or anything that is a big issue you need to look out for?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fokker416 View Post
    I saw the same thing. I've never trained with the load though so I'd like to learn more. How about this.... To those who use the load, is there anything that you don't like about it, or anything that is a big issue you need to look out for?
    To me it seems like the kinking could be an issue if you don't pull the hose all the way out of the loops. If you flat lay and extend the hose most often anyplace there is an S the hose will straighten itself when charged.

    But sure anybody using this loop thing? Let's here your experiences.

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    We are now carrying a 100' 1 3/4" high rise pack loaded with the Cleveland Load: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BUGL5...eature=related
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    We are not currently using this load, but I have experimented with it a little at my previous station assignment (got transferred before I got done playing around with it). The kinking Fyred mentioned is a none issue. When we charged the hose to 100 psi, there was no kinking (our SOP for pumping standpipes is 160 psi +/- elevation). The line pays out very well and IMHO works much better than our current high rise packs which are 200 feet flat loaded into a "Manhattan Bag".

    The one part which I wanted to test out prior to pushing it into service is connecting two 100 foot bundles and see how that works out. Many of our buildings need 200 feet (or more, we have some really long hallways). Anyone who is currently using these have any ideas? I was thinking maybe placing one section on the floor below to hook up to the standpipe then the second load on the fire floor. Also, what are some ways people carry the extra equipment, i.e. globe valve wheels, wrenches, etc. Lastly, here is another video I found that shows the bundle load pretty well.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=digkD...eature=related

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    Default re

    We use this hose load on our pre-connected hose loads. It works well with low manpower. Just like in the video the coil will charge. We have 150 feet on the pre-connect. I can send you the pics of how we pack it and a video of the hose load coming off.

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    Default hose loads

    We use the bundled hose load on our pre-connects. We have 150 feet of 1 3/4 hose on the two pre-connects. The hose comes off clean and is easily lead out by one person. It can be a little tricky at first but, after a few pulls it works nicely. If you set the "coil" near the door it will completely fill and just like in the video when you walk out the hose follows you. It's using the same principle of a garden hose, fills from the outside. I have pics of how to pack it using 150 feet of 1 3/4 hose line and pics on how to lead it out if you want them

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    Looks intriguing, but...

    1. The kinking bothers me. To those of you using it, what pressure have you found you need to avoid this?

    2. I can't imagine using a hoseload that is so inflexible that you can't advance the line dry at all. It seems that a horseshoe would accomplish almost exact same thing as this, but allow you to stretch any portion of it dry. Thoughts?

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    Post Well...............

    I get hammered for mentioning this, but my personal preference is a Slot Load, straight up, Nozzle on top. Nozzleman takes the Nozzle and the next 4-5 folds and books for the Fire. Next person clears the Bed and chases any kinks. The Simpler the Load, the less chance of a screwup.
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    Quote Originally Posted by hwoods View Post
    I get hammered for mentioning this, but my personal preference is a Slot Load, straight up, Nozzle on top. Nozzleman takes the Nozzle and the next 4-5 folds and books for the Fire. Next person clears the Bed and chases any kinks. The Simpler the Load, the less chance of a screwup.
    Sounds like a regular flat load broke in the middle?
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    Lightbulb Nope!.........

    Quote Originally Posted by GTRider245 View Post
    Sounds like a regular flat load broke in the middle?

    Not Really. You connect the hose to the discharge, rack it in flat, bottom to the top, put the pipe on and let it lay on top of the load.

    We get to the Fire, I take the Pipe and a few folds and start toward the Fire. You grab a few more folds and try to keep up with me. Driver, or someone else if we're fat on staffing, clears the bed and chases any kinks.

    My guys hate this load, they like the one with the pipe in the middle of the rack, so to be fair and objective, I hate their load.

    I can have water faster than they can, every time out.

    We have a couple of long lines, due to some Condo developments that we run, Including a 400 ft. 1.5 inch, and a 600 ft. "Dead Load" with 200 ft. 1.5 on top of 400 ft. of 2 inch. The "Dead Load" works on the FDNY Principle of "You pull what you think you'll need" and the Driver breaks the line from the bed and connects to a discharge.

    Condos - We have some where you can arrive to find Fire at a Window, located next to a Door. BUT, the door goes into a different unit, you have to go to the rear to get to the Fire........ (Yes, some of the Real Estate Developers here are a bit goofy).
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    Quote Originally Posted by GTRider245 View Post
    We are now carrying a 100' 1 3/4" high rise pack loaded with the Cleveland Load: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BUGL5...eature=related

    We recently started using this exact same load in all of our High-Rise packs (100' of 1-3/4" light-weight hose with a smooth-bore nozzle). I was extremely skeptical of this load at first, but after having used it multiple times, I am completely sold on it. It is very easy to load, carry and most importantly, to deploy. The line virtually will not kink, so long as it is completely charged prior to advancing it.
    If it is, for whatever reason, advanced prior to being fully charged and a few kinks develop, a few very rapid, full opening and closings of the bail will eliminate them.
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    Default Sorry, Same Question

    Sorry to repost this section of my post from above, but I was still looking for some answers.......

    The one part which I wanted to test out prior to pushing it into service is connecting two 100 foot bundles and see how that works out. Many of our buildings need 200 feet (or more, we have some really long hallways). Anyone who is currently using these have any ideas? I was thinking maybe placing one section on the floor below to hook up to the standpipe then the second load on the fire floor. Also, what are some ways people carry the extra equipment, i.e. globe valve wheels, wrenches, etc.

    Any help, suggestions, and or input would be greatly appreciated.

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    Prince George's County FD
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    using this load for hi-rise operations seems very restrictive in more than one area. It says not to advance the hose until it is charged, you have to connect it at the floor below, charge it, then take it to the fire door, make the stretch and start fighting fire. You can no longer flake extra hose up the stairs, across the hall, or out a window to assist with the stretch in. If you connect on the fire floor you are putting yourself, your crew and anyone else above the fire in a bad spot if you get pushed out of that position. also the concerns were voiced with needing more line or extending the line, using 1 3/4 line is going to eat up alot of friction loss, and hopefully that is not a 100 psi fog nozzle.

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    Default A couple of tricks to try!

    Howdy,
    Our dept has these coil loads in place with 100' of 1 1/2" or 1 3/4". We use three pieces of webbing and plastic clips to hold the bundle together. If you throw the bundle down, remove the straps and open the roll a bit.. you can grab the coils near the nozzle and advance the line dry dropping the outer coil each time it becomes tight.

    The most impressive deployment with a coil load like this is to drop the bundle on edge leaning against a wall, like on a stair well. Remove the straps and charge the coil. As the coils fill maintain the coils up against the wall. The whole bunch will then take up very little space and still be easily advanced.

    Have a great day.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BlitzfireSolo View Post
    Looks intriguing, but...

    1. The kinking bothers me. To those of you using it, what pressure have you found you need to avoid this?

    2. I can't imagine using a hoseload that is so inflexible that you can't advance the line dry at all. It seems that a horseshoe would accomplish almost exact same thing as this, but allow you to stretch any portion of it dry. Thoughts?

    The line can be advanced dry. You need to remove the nozzle from the center of the load and walk out. As long as the "coil" is not tangled on itself it will fill and expand. As you pull more hose it will peel off from the center. In the video I believe the only reason that they filled it so close to the engine was to demostrate on the hose fills and flakes off. Also, we have 150 feet of 1 3/4 in this load. Once the two runner sections are pulled out you set the coil 10 feet from the engine and charge the hose. All 150 feet will fill.

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    We started using this for our high-rise packs because of its flexibility and kink resistance. Also, you can stretch dry. What you do is find the middle of the bundle and set it on your shoulder so as you walk you just keep dropping coils. Works great. Another neat attribute is that if you are in tight quarters, you can hold it vertical and have it charge against the wall.

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