Thread: Sked

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    Default Sked

    I have heard that the SKED stretcher are not perfect to use on high angle rescue`s how true are this and what do you use? What would you say is a good stretcher to use for confined space and high angle rescue`s?

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    The SKED has it's uses, confined space - good, High angle - so so depends on the situation. If you don't have tight spaces a stokes is better on high angle rescue from a patient comfort point of view. It's not what you use it's how and the more options you have, the better you will be able to do those tricky operations.
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    I agree with NJTF1Bowman regarding the stokes. If you are using a SKED in high angle, most likely you're going to be using a rigid spine board of some type. Using that spine board in conjunction with a metal frame stokes allows you a greater ability to rig either a vertical or horizontal raising / lowering system. The SKED does not have the rigidity as the stokes and I personally would be a bit leery of using it in a high angle environment. Also with the stokes, you have multiple options of securing the patient into the basket using webbing, pre-assembled harnesses or bridals. Invest the money on a good stokes basket and you'll find that you made the right choice not only in regards to equipment performance, but as NJTF1Bowman stated, the patient will feel more confident in the equipment as well. Flimsy plastic versus solid, rigid steel basket. What would YOU want to be rescued in while elevated say 5 or 10 stories up in the air?

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    I agree with what has been said so far to a point. However, if you are limited on funds or have the potential to hoof it way off the beaten path, the SKED is a good option. The SKED is a more versatile device. We use both, I prefer the stokes for high angle as well. But, you can use a SKED in the application with no problem at all.
    Jason Brooks
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    I agree with all the points made so far. But I also think a SKED is a great device for vertical lowers over roofs and out windows where no high point COD exists. I know the stokes isn't that difficult to use, but still like the compactness of the SKED.

    I do not like using Junkins (older models) as the rails can get hung up on the walls and window sills.

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    Mattraining,

    Your asking about a product for both CS rescue and high-angle. If I had to have 1 product to be used for both situations I would take a SKED. It has more uses and will get in more spaces than a typical stokes basket.

    While a stokes is great for rope rescue, it has limited uses in confined space. (unless you purchase a seperate low profile basket) It doesn't make corners very well and it is difficult to package someone in a tight space. To use a stokes in CS rescue, depending on the size of the space, you may have to remove them from the space with yet another device to then package them. The SKED can be used in many spaces and you can package someone where they lie.

    I agree with most of what everyone else is saying from an individual basis, for a one for all product would be a SKED.

    I prefer to use a Sked in a vertical fashion on rope rescues if I am working without a highpoint COD. I find the SKED is easier to transition with the smooth bottom. Just a personal preferance. There are techniques to make a fairly easy transition with a stokes as well. Keep in mind that if transitioning a horizontal SKED the bridle straps run under the device and can get hung up.

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    For those off the beaten path rescues go with a break apart stokes. The titanium models are worth their (lack of) weight. SKED does do the confined space thing well....

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    The original question seems to be what device would be best for both, high-angle and CS application.

    Personnally, I believe that the SKED is a much better "all-around" device than the stokes. The SKED works well in tight environments and is more than capable of handling any high-angle evolution. I prefer to use a SKED when lowering a vertical litter as the SKED has a shorter bridle and the smooth bottom makes for an easy transition off a roof or window.

    I think you would be surprised at the patients respnse to the SKED. It is human nature to feel more secure when we are encapsulated in something. We all know the SKED wraps you up like a burritto and therefore I have to respectfully disagree with the notion that a patient would feel less secure in a SKED.

    One major flaw in teh SKED is that the lifting straps that come with it are extrememly short. Because this is a CS litter, I am sure the manufactuer wanted to keep the bridle as short as possible. The problem is unless you rig the bridle to a ring or anchor plate, etc., the bridle cannot accept 1 carabiner. The angles are simply too sharp.

    The stokes is a good option as well and previous posts point out those benefits. The newer baskets are much lighter and more durable that previous models.

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    Quote Originally Posted by skennedy4 View Post

    One major flaw in teh SKED is that the lifting straps that come with it are extrememly short. Because this is a CS litter, I am sure the manufactuer wanted to keep the bridle as short as possible. The problem is unless you rig the bridle to a ring or anchor plate, etc., the bridle cannot accept 1 carabiner. The angles are simply too sharp.
    A valid issue indeed. A Tri-Link is supplied with the SKED for just this reason.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MG3610 View Post
    A valid issue indeed. A Tri-Link is supplied with the SKED for just this reason.
    It does not come with one, but that is the best way to rig it with one point. As previously stated, a small anchor plate will work as well. For a team on a tight budget, the SKED is the best choice for versatility.
    Jason Brooks
    IAFF Local 2388
    IACOJ

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    Thanx all,
    The group that we are helping did deside to get both, but the info was really helpfull.

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