1. #26
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    Default when to call the FM

    Here is part of a document I got last summer from my chief, it was distributed by The Penna State Police Troop "C"

    To all Fire Chiefs, designees and Clearfield County Control:



    Troop C Fire Marshal(s) will respond immediately to the following fires:



    a. Fatal fire
    b. Catastrophic fire
    c. Attempted homicide
    d. Property damage in excess of $1,000,000
    e. Any fire of such an unusual nature that would be expected to generate higher than normal media attention
    f. A fire which resulted in any injury to an emergency responder or serious bodily injury to other persons
    g. Any suspicious fire which is thought to be part of an arson pattern in the area

    In general, fires which do not fall into any of the above listed categories and have an estimated monetary loss of $75,000 or less will not require the immediate response of a Deputy or Assistant Deputy Fire Marshal. Additionally, vehicle fires, shed fires, detached garage fires and seasonal residence/camp fires will normally not require the immediate response of a Deputy or Assistant Deputy Fire Marshal, unless one of the criteria above applies.

    Requests for immediate responses to fires which do not fit into the above categories shall be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. The approving officer shall take the following factors into consideration during the decision making process:

    a. Is the fire suspicious, and if so, based upon what circumstances?

    i. Any signs of forcible entry
    ii. Physical evidence at the scene such as gas cans or tire tracks
    iii. Does the structure have no electrical service or other utilities which could account for an accidental ignition?
    iv. The time of the fire (most arsons occur between midnight and 0500)
    v. Is the owner present and do his/her statements make sense?

    vi. Potential for destruction or contamination of evidence
    vii. Inability to secure the scene
    viii. Potential loss of ability to interview occupants, witnesses, owners, suspects, and first responders
    ix. Potential restriction or denial of access to the scene at a later time
    x. Successful completion of the investigation will be significantly hampered by a delayed response

    b. What is the Fire Chiefís initial opinion of the cause- is it suspicious or does he feel itís probably an accident, but would just like confirmation, in which case an immediate response would not be necessary.

  2. #27
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    Default When to call the FM

    I received this from my chief, it came from Troop "C" Penna State Police.
    To all Fire Chiefs, designees and Clearfield County Control:



    Troop C Fire Marshal(s) will respond immediately to the following fires:



    a. Fatal fire
    b. Catastrophic fire
    c. Attempted homicide
    d. Property damage in excess of $1,000,000
    e. Any fire of such an unusual nature that would be expected to generate higher than normal media attention
    f. A fire which resulted in any injury to an emergency responder or serious bodily injury to other persons
    g. Any suspicious fire which is thought to be part of an arson pattern in the area

    In general, fires which do not fall into any of the above listed categories and have an estimated monetary loss of $75,000 or less will not require the immediate response of a Deputy or Assistant Deputy Fire Marshal. Additionally, vehicle fires, shed fires, detached garage fires and seasonal residence/camp fires will normally not require the immediate response of a Deputy or Assistant Deputy Fire Marshal, unless one of the criteria above applies.

    Requests for immediate responses to fires which do not fit into the above categories shall be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. The approving officer shall take the following factors into consideration during the decision making process:

    a. Is the fire suspicious, and if so, based upon what circumstances?

    i. Any signs of forcible entry
    ii. Physical evidence at the scene such as gas cans or tire tracks
    iii. Does the structure have no electrical service or other utilities which could account for an accidental ignition?
    iv. The time of the fire (most arsons occur between midnight and 0500)
    v. Is the owner present and do his/her statements make sense?

    vi. Potential for destruction or contamination of evidence
    vii. Inability to secure the scene
    viii. Potential loss of ability to interview occupants, witnesses, owners, suspects, and first responders
    ix. Potential restriction or denial of access to the scene at a later time
    x. Successful completion of the investigation will be significantly hampered by a delayed response

    b. What is the Fire Chiefís initial opinion of the cause- is it suspicious or does he feel itís probably an accident, but would just like confirmation, in which case an immediate response would not be necessary.

  3. #28

    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    California
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    Default George the wonderful

    Wow, George.

    A little arrogant and self impressed? Can you walk on water too?

    Lighten up, man.

  4. #29
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    Default

    I don't know the SOPs of most departments, but I do know that anytime there is a victim with burns of more than 5% BSA, the department is required to notify the state FM. This applies whether or not the department uses its own investigators, and also applies to incidents where the burns were not received in a structure fire.

  5. #30
    CFEI / CFII
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    Georgia
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by emt161 View Post
    I don't know the SOPs of most departments, but I do know that anytime there is a victim with burns of more than 5% BSA, the department is required to notify the state FM. This applies whether or not the department uses its own investigators, and also applies to incidents where the burns were not received in a structure fire.
    I have to ask...What national standard, law, or regulation are you quoting. I have never heard of the 5% rule.

    When fire is cried and danger is neigh,
    "God and the firemen" is the people's cry;
    But when 'tis out and all things righted,
    God is forgotten and the firemen slighted.
    ~Author unknown, from The Fireman's Journal, 18 Oct 1879

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