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  1. #1

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    Default I'm an active duty US Marine with no time to get any real certs... advice?

    I'm an active duty US Marine, i'm an infantryman and just got back from a combat deployment to Afghanistan. I'm also a Volunteer FF at a local department and my USMC unit is deploying again this summer and I want to try and get my FF 1 & 2 or EMT-B but we've just got no time at all because we're constantly training and whatnot. What options if any do I have in obtaining my FF 1&2 or EMT-B? My schedule is so packed that i'm not even able to attend night classes... pretty much online seems to be my only option?

    What online programs are there to get your FF 1&2? I did a google search but just got a bunch of spam.

    Thanks


  2. #2
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    Default Help From a Former Marine

    Hey Marine,

    I got out last June, I did 6 years as a 8541(Sniper). I was stationed in Camp Lejeune and I managed to get EMT-B, FF 1 & 2, as well as a handfull of other certs including Vehicle Rescue Tech, Emergency Vehicle Operator and High Rise. I don't know where you're stationed, but you're best bet, go to the fire station on base or the crash crew guys on the air station, find out if there is any MCI's that roll over credit. If not, find out what correspondance courses you can take while deployed. Any community college has non credit EMT courses you can take while in garrison. If you're in Lejeune, head over to Coastal Carolina Community College, they have a decent EMT school. Good luck and Semper Fi.

  3. #3
    Forum Member FortechFEO's Avatar
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    Default

    I think Texas fire school does the school stuff online then you have to go do hands on for a week or weekend. Best thing I can think of. Good luck Devil Dog and thanks for the work! Hopefully all is well stateside for you!
    "The probability of someone watching you is proportional to the stupidity of your action."

  4. #4
    Permanently Removed CALFFBOU's Avatar
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    Accord- Whoa, hold on there brother. Please don’t be in such a rush. Here are my thoughts-

    -I would not be so concerned about "getting certs". I have always told people- Cert. piling is nice, but did you retain the information? Get the certs. and remember what they taught you. I say this because the tone of your posting makes it sound like you just want to paper grab and then move on.

    -I would not worry about these certs right now and focus on your task at hand. You are getting ready to go into a combat situation, I think you have better things to worry about. Go to your assignment, kick *** and then come home and settle in on schooling and the career.

    -You threw out FF1, FF2 and EMT. I have no idea what location your speaking of, or what state? Regardless, I have advised Candidates in the past to pick out where they want to work, live and settle down. THEN focus is on the requirements there. Texas is different from Utah and California. Once you pick your nest, then get to work. Maybe use your GI bene. to buy a house.

    To wrap all up, I suggest taking baby step and slowly climb the ladder to success. Everything in moderation. No need to go balls to the wall and cram. Volunteering, classes and jobs will always be here. Take it smooth, easy and progress.

    Bou
    Last edited by CALFFBOU; 02-18-2009 at 03:33 PM.

  5. #5
    MembersZone Subscriber USMCFFighter's Avatar
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    Oo-Rah Devil Dog!

    I was a grunt and was always in the field but managed to make it to an accelerated EMT-B Basic course (30 days) when we came back from Iraq. Rather than go home on leave when we returned from Iraq, I stayed and enrolled in the course and my command let me attend the Few days the course extended past our leave return date. I also joined the local Volunteer Fire Dept just off of the base at Camp Lejeune. They would meet periodically but there were alot of Marines there wanting to train. We hit alot of areas thoroughly; ventilation, forcible entry, fire streams, etc. No certs but valuable information. Where there's a will there's a way. If anyone knows this it's You.

    Finally, start researching the dept/dept's you're interested in and test, test, test, test................ Also, look at their requirements and use this as your playbook for getting hired. If you need any help pm me and if I don't know I'll find out. Semper Fi! Smooth Winds and Fair Seas.
    "Once You Find Something You Enjoy Doing, Then It's No Longer Work!"

    "Uncommon Valor Was A Common Virtue"-Adm. Nimitz about Marines in the Battle of Iwo Jima


  6. #6
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    Default reenlist? change mos

    Try to request changing Mos's The school in texas is great you get ff1 ff2 haz mat-ops arff and first responder. all you need is a fr-emtb bridgecourse. Its not just s fire class. The school puts hands on info down your throat. as well as sits you in the classroom. Ive seen/been through other classes w/ the same certs. if you cant change and you arent staying active consider reserve or guard. It also depends on the dept. you are going for. Consider medic mos. Its alot of esperience but only emt-b transfers over to the civilian side. I thought I needed alot of certs and I scored really high on my tests but when it comes down to a civil service test I struggle. So just keep thst in mind to study for.

  7. #7
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    Accord,
    Thanks for serving OUR country and making it safer for all of us. The best thing you can do is to take online classes. You can do them through Alan Hancock if you are in California. If not, check out your local area and see what is available.

    Getting your EMT course is huge. The course is offered at night and on weekends. Talk to your squad leader and see if it's possible to get it done before you deploy. The more you do now, the more marketable you will be when you get out. Former military people do very well in the fire service. The more you bring to the table in the way of qualifications, the better your chances of getting hired.

    Lastly, is it possible to go to corpsman school? This would be a huge advantage when testing for the fire service.

    Stay safe and best of luck to you,

    Paul Lepore
    Battalion Chief
    www.aspiringfirefighters.com
    Paul Lepore
    Battalion Chief
    www.aspiringfirefighters.com

  8. #8
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    Here is an article I wrote on the transition from the military to the fire service. I hope you enjoy it.

    Military Experience
    Candidates who have served our country in the Armed Forces have a huge advantage over those who have not. It is generally believed that while a military veterans may not have as many certificates and fire science units as the other candidates (they were busy serving our country), they offer so much more.
    There is no substitute for life experience. The personal growth a young man or woman experiences in the military is second to none. This growth is of course magnified depending on the assignments held. Many of those who joined the military at a young age grew up very rapidly when put into dangerous situations.
    Being assigned to the front line is not required to get “credit” for serving in the military. Fire departments realize that there are many support roles that require dedication and commitment. While there is only one person on the nozzle that puts out the fire, there are numerous other assignments that need to take place on the fire ground. It is important that a firefighter be willing to work in a support role for the good of the team.
    The fire service is a para-military organization. Many of the common terms in the fire service, such as Captain and lieutenants were taken directly from the military. Words like code, honor, commitment, and integrity are as important to the fire service as they are to the military.
    Men and women with military backgrounds are usually very mature, regardless of their age. They understand the need to get along with others, especially with people who come from different backgrounds from them. They understand commitment and the need to work until the job is completed. They are used to working for long periods of time in less than ideal conditions.
    Physical fitness is emphasized in the military. As a result military men and women are usually in very good shape. This is extremely important to the fire service, because the number one reason entry-level candidates fail out of the academy is due to poor physical fitness. In addition, a physically fit firefighter will miss less time due to injury than a firefighter who is not fit. Military personnel have been taught the importance of a life-long physical fitness program and the importance of proper diet. These good habits will be shared with the firefighters in the station.
    Military people demonstrate respect for authority and understand the chain of command. The fire service operates on the same hierarchy principle as the military. The group clearly understands code and honor. These qualities are extremely important in the fire service, because firefighters are held to a higher standard than the average person in the community.
    Military men and women are used to working in a structured environment. They understand the importance of doing something right the first time. Similar to the fire department, people’s lives are impacted if things are not kept in a constant state of operational readiness. Firefighters must check out their equipment each and every day. They must know the intricacies of each tool kept on the engine or truck. Training and continuing education are essential to the fire service. It is imperative that firefighters are able to work unsupervised; completion of a job or task is a reflection of them.
    Getting along in the fire station is critically important to being successful in the fire service. Courtesy to fellow firefighters is critical. Cleaning up after one self is expected. This is one of the first things military men and women learn in Basic Training.
    One of the strengths found in military men and women, however, is also commonly a cause of strife during their probationary year. People who have earned rank in the military are used to giving orders. As a rookie firefighter you are expected to take orders, not give them. Humility is an extremely important quality to possess as a rookie firefighter. Oftentimes rookie firefighters who have spent time in the military are older than the average candidate.
    It is not uncommon for an older probationary firefighter to be working under the tutelage of a much younger senior firefighter, engineer, or even lieutenant or captain. If the rookie firefighter does not have the proper mind set, he or she will be in for a difficult probationary year.
    If you are still in the military and are interested in a career in the fire service, it is important that you start making provisions NOW. Start taking online classes NOW.
    If possible, put yourself in a position to get fire service-related training such as Medic or Corpsman. Hazardous Materials and firefighter training will also be beneficial. Lastly, work on general education courses so you can earn your Associates degree.
    Do not be intimidated by all of the candidates who have every certification under the sun. They were able to obtain these as full-time students while you were busy fulfilling your continuous to the American people.
    A candidate who is an EMT, possesses related experience as a reserve or volunteer firefighter, and is active taking fire science courses is usually at the top of his or her game. Get your qualifications, learn how to take a fire department interview, and earn your badge.
    Paul Lepore
    Battalion Chief
    www.aspiringfirefighters.com
    Paul Lepore
    Battalion Chief
    www.aspiringfirefighters.com

  9. #9
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    Default Active Duty

    Accord,

    I would advise you to go to your base education office as well as the base fire department and get enrolled in FF I if this is what you really want to do. It is free for you while you are active, and is offered via the USAF distance learning (IFIADL if you want to google) and since it is a military course it will transfer wherever you go. You have up to a year from enrollment to complete the written test and practical portions. Also you will need to get Hazmat Awareness as a prereq for your FFI. This can be accomplished at the base fd via computer and a practical test. I assume your current CONUS base has a DOD fire department, most likely civilians on structural and military on ARFF. They will be a HUGE help to you, trust me. Also the crews downrange can help when you get there, even if they may be contract instead of DOD civilian/military. Seriously, go talk to the base fire department; they won't steer you wrong.

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    Default devildog

    What unit you with devil?? I was in 3/2 served from 2003-2007....03 bullet sponge all the way...ive been going to school for fire science since i got out and have been on the civil service list for two years now. if theres anything i can tell you its just a big game of hurry up and wait. but us Marines are used to that.. take your time, settle down and while your at it, i need a fighting hole dug. get some of the boots to do it...HAHA Semper Fi brother

  11. #11
    MembersZone Subscriber USMCFFighter's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jman696 View Post
    I was in 3/2 served from 2003-2007....
    What's Going On JMAN,

    Were you in 3/2 in the initial push into Iraq/Nasiriyah. "Task Force Tarawa." Just curious because if so, we were hookin and jabbin side by side...............
    "Once You Find Something You Enjoy Doing, Then It's No Longer Work!"

    "Uncommon Valor Was A Common Virtue"-Adm. Nimitz about Marines in the Battle of Iwo Jima


  12. #12
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    Default hello

    nah I didnt get pushed to Iraq until 2005 and then again in 2006. but i got a bunch of buddies that were there for the initial push. Semper FI

  13. #13
    Forum Member Paul316's Avatar
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    Default Yo

    Quote Originally Posted by jman696 View Post
    What unit you with devil?? I was in 3/2 served from 2003-2007....03 bullet sponge all the way...ive been going to school for fire science since i got out and have been on the civil service list for two years now. if theres anything i can tell you its just a big game of hurry up and wait. but us Marines are used to that.. take your time, settle down and while your at it, i need a fighting hole dug. get some of the boots to do it...HAHA Semper Fi brother
    What's up brother I was in 2/2 Golf Co. as an 0311 from 2002 - 2006! Since I been out Civvie life has been rough. I got PTSD and taking some psychiatric medications and the Fairfax County Fire and Rescue actually disqualified me for that! Do you have any suggestions on what I could possibly do? Are PTSD and psychiatric medications automatic disqualifiers in the medical side of it? Because my medical classification rating was a D and that's why I got disqualified. I thought out of all places, the Fire Department would hire Veterans over others! Anyways hit me back when you can brother greatly appreciate it! Semper Fi!

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