1. #1
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    Default Paratech struts and Bipod head

    I just received a large supply of Paratech Struts and Bipod head. My team is planning to use them for trench and collapse mostly.But i am looking for some inventive and unique uses of the struts and espicially the bipod head.

    The bipod head was primarilly purchased for creating a high poin directional for rope work, but any otherr idea and uses are appreciated.

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    This is a scenario we none at ExtricationFest! last year.

    When a heavy wrecker is not availible, we use what we have.

    The tow line is attached to a small roll back wrecker with a wench comparable to your rescue trucks. It lifted it with all ease.
    Last edited by LeeJunkins; 02-23-2009 at 08:50 PM.
    http://www.midsouthrescue.org
    Is it time to change our training yet ?

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    Lee -

    First let me say I am not trying to armchair quarterback you or your organziation. I have used the bi-pod as a demo for Paratech so my experience with this model is limited. With rope it is pretty straight forward approach.

    With that said...i am not sold on this application of the bipod. Here's why:

    1. Bi-pods are inherently unstable. As such they must have adequate front and back ties to help support them. They maintain stability through vector forces. The forces have to be within a stabile footprint of the bipod and offest with front ties and tie backs. (This is also true with a monopod)

    2. The action on the bipod, due to the pull of the winch, would eventually pull the load to the bipod making it unstable. The angle seems to be too great to get much lift. It seems you would get more pull.

    3. When using a bi-pod to lift, the lift should be as short as possible (this is due to their inherent instability), and preferably the load should be within the foot print and/or swing of the bipod.

    4. Why is the lift being done off the front wheel? Most auto ex folks harp in not lifting by the wheels as the suspension can add to the lift and instability.

    5. I know you may be showing an alternative use, but airbags or lift jacks would make this evolution much less complex.

    6. Finally, The angle of the COD angle from the winch to the truck is pretty good. For those of you that may try this, that COD has to be less than 60 degrees (or 120 degrees depends on how you read a protractor ) After that there will be a mutiplication of forces on the COD. I don't know how much a tractor weighs, but if I remember correctly the bipod has around a 4,000 pound limit (height dependant).

    Again, if you have more information to share please do; you were obviously there and I am interested to know how it worked or if there were any problems associated with it.

    Thanks!

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    cctrtlt2 -

    I don't know that there are too many "alternative" uses for the equipment that you are getting. It is what it is.

    I will say that the nice thing about an adjustable height bipod is that it can be used in confined areas. For instance we used one for a rope class inside a building to go down an elevator shaft. Most people see a bipod and automatically think rescue in the woods or over a cliff. These are just as useful in industrial and urban rope rescue as well as with lifting and moving USAR applications.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jmatthe2553 View Post
    Lee -

    First let me say I am not trying to armchair quarterback you or your organziation. I have used the bi-pod as a demo for Paratech so my experience with this model is limited. With rope it is pretty straight forward approach.

    With that said...i am not sold on this application of the bipod. Here's why:

    1. Bi-pods are inherently unstable. As such they must have adequate front and back ties to help support them. They maintain stability through vector forces. The forces have to be within a stabile footprint of the bipod and offest with front ties and tie backs. (This is also true with a monopod)

    2. The action on the bipod, due to the pull of the winch, would eventually pull the load to the bipod making it unstable. The angle seems to be too great to get much lift. It seems you would get more pull.

    3. When using a bi-pod to lift, the lift should be as short as possible (this is due to their inherent instability), and preferably the load should be within the foot print and/or swing of the bipod.

    4. Why is the lift being done off the front wheel? Most auto ex folks harp in not lifting by the wheels as the suspension can add to the lift and instability.

    5. I know you may be showing an alternative use, but airbags or lift jacks would make this evolution much less complex.

    6. Finally, The angle of the COD angle from the winch to the truck is pretty good. For those of you that may try this, that COD has to be less than 60 degrees (or 120 degrees depends on how you read a protractor ) After that there will be a mutiplication of forces on the COD. I don't know how much a tractor weighs, but if I remember correctly the bipod has around a 4,000 pound limit (height dependant).

    Again, if you have more information to share please do; you were obviously there and I am interested to know how it worked or if there were any problems associated with it.

    Thanks!
    The pic here is a little deceiving, This was a demo of what can be done using the small local wrecker, in the event that a heavy wrecker is unavailable.
    I was not in the class at the time as I run the whole event but this was put on by the national manager of Paratech and Billy Leach of Big Rig Rescue.

    1. The reason most instructors say not to lift by the wheel is because the spring suspension will give and you loose lifting travel. By blocking between the spring and frame you eliminate this problem. The wheel itself is made to handle the weight of the truck even at high speeds it is not going to fail.

    2. The actual axle weight of this truck is 12,000 lbs. This is were the pic is so deceiving, the wheel on the other side is setting solid, so we are only lifting half of that weight or 6,000 lbs. The other side is anchored in two places with 5/8 grade 80 chain which is rated at 18,100 lbs each so it can not swing toward the bipod.

    3. I personally do not know the WLL of the bipod head but the struts are 4000lbs each with the weight distributed equally on the two we have a WLL of 8,000 lbs so all equipment used is with in their working load limits.

    4. I am at the mercy of only having one picture, but I do agree with you about the angle of the tow cable, and in an other evolution I did see that the bipod was actually up against the side of the truck, so they may have seen the same thing we are.

    One side of the truck was successfully lifted about 6 inches inorder to extricate the driver.

    I can get you more detailed info from Ron Lehman (Paratech) and Billy Leach (Big Rig Rescue) if needed.

    There was a dinameter in the line so they can tell you exactly how much weight was on the wench also.
    Last edited by LeeJunkins; 03-05-2009 at 12:48 PM.
    http://www.midsouthrescue.org
    Is it time to change our training yet ?

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    Lee - Thanks for the reply and for describing the photo in more depth.

    Jeff

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