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    Question Rescue Ambulance

    Most fire departments staff their Ambulances with dual trained Fire/EMS personnel. Some of these will staff a station with 2 or 3 Firefighters and then they choose between an Ambulance or Fire Apparatus based on the call. I would like to see how your department uses your ambulances to provide more than strictly EMS. Do you have a small CAFS system? Do you carry large Water Cans or other hand held extinguishers? SCBA? Wetsuit or Drysuit for Ice/Swiftwater rescues? Give me a description and throw out a picture of how your compartments are laid out.

    Here is a pic of FDNY's Haz Tac units to start off.

    http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3031/...39d39f.jpg?v=0

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    We run 13 ALS ambulances, and each is equipped with two SCBA, irons, handlights, personal lights, and a 2.5 gallon water can, and a large compartment for the two personnel to store thier gear for the tour.

    We staff the ambulance and the other rigs in each station, so we don't have to choose which rig to take when the tones activate.

    Our ambulances (by our response matrix) will generally assume EMS and rehab on arrival, unless the IC determines they're needed for RIT, at which time, at least one more (but sometimes two) additional ambulances will be summoned to the scene to back fill the EMS/rehab role.
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    Are the Haz-Tac units from FDNY staffed by Firefighters or by EMTs?
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    I believe they are staffed with two Paramedics. The Paramedics are trained as Hazardous Materials Technicians, and some are also trained as Confined Space Rescue Technicians. These Haz Tac units train with units under the Special Operations Command.
    Last edited by viperfire1; 05-27-2009 at 01:47 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BoxAlarm187 View Post
    We run 13 ALS ambulances, and each is equipped with two SCBA, irons, handlights, personal lights, and a 2.5 gallon water can, and a large compartment for the two personnel to store thier gear for the tour.
    Ditto, minus 10 ambulances. We run three ALS units set up as described by Box.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BoxAlarm187 View Post
    We run 13 ALS ambulances, and each is equipped with two SCBA, irons, handlights, personal lights, and a 2.5 gallon water can, and a large compartment for the two personnel to store thier gear for the tour.
    Same goes for us.

    There is a Combination EMS dept. near me that also runs a rescue that recently placed an order for a new ALS unit that includes a cafs system, a pre-connected tool(s) SCBA's, and a few other more "fire" related items. needless to say it's raising a few eyebrows and stiring the pot with some of the neighboring FD's. I don't remember who's building it, but when it comes in I'll try and get a picture of it posted.
    Last edited by RoofTopTrucky; 05-27-2009 at 08:25 PM.
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    Default It's being done more and more

    I know Rosenbauer introduced a full size pumper a few years ago that had transport capabilities and some of the ambulance builders are making units with some sort of fire suppression product installed. Here are some photos of a new concept Crimson just came out with. There are 4 modules that can be mixed and matched to the departments requirements. You can have the bone box in the rear or up front like the one in the photo. Can mount on a 4 door commercial chassis or a Furion custom.
    Attached Images Attached Images      

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    No problemo for us,NO busses. FIRE only.Will that be an Engine,Tank,or a Ladder? T.C.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RoofTopTrucky View Post
    Same goes for us.

    There is a Combination EMS dept. near me that also runs a rescue that recently placed an order for a new ALS unit that includes a cafs system, a pre-connected tool(s) SCBA's, and a few other more "fire" related items. needless to say it's raising a few eyebrows and stiring the pot with some of the neighboring FD's. I don't remember who's building it, but when it comes in I'll try and get a picture of it posted.
    It was built by Horton Ambulance on an International Chassis. It came in a few weeks or so ago. There are a few pictures of it on the dealer's website, but none really show the "extras" in great detail.

    http://www.kolaja.com/recentdeliveries.html

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    I've got 15 ALS Med Units. All are equipped the same. A compartment for the 2 SCBA's and bunker gear, and the others for backboards, extinguishers, and the rest of the stuff (for lack of a better description). They also have a tellular system for 12 lead cardiac signals to all the hospitals.

    In order to ride the meat mobile, you have to be a paramedic. On fire calls, they stay with the Med Unit, until needed. A second unit is called when needed, or as a supplement. The IC makes the call. They don't fight the fires.

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    One of my neighboring companies has run this International/LifeLine Ambulance/Rescue unit. They deal w/ lots of water rescue, and have outfitted it to be able to run as first out for most of the types of rescue that they might encounter. It carries the water stuff along with a basic set of Holmatro tools for vehicle extrication. Mutual aid has a heavy rescue just up the road, so help isn't far away if the scene is more than they can handle.

    http://www.lakecityfire.org/squad_577.htm

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    Quote Originally Posted by FireMedic049 View Post
    It was built by Horton Ambulance on an International Chassis. It came in a few weeks or so ago. There are a few pictures of it on the dealer's website, but none really show the "extras" in great detail.

    http://www.kolaja.com/recentdeliveries.html
    That would be it,

    My argument is what good is all of the extras when your transporting PTs to the hospital.
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    We have career medics, working 24 hour shifts, along with career EMT's, who work M-F from 6am to 6pm, and occasional weekends during high-run, low-volunteer level periods (such as holiday weekends in the summertime.) We have two ALS ambulances, two engines, and a light-duty squad company.

    The Medics and EMT's are all fully trained as EMS and Fire personnel. The ambulances are both equipped with two SCBA, a set of irons, a 6 foot hook, and a can.

    During the daytime, the in-station staff is pretty good about coordinating with volunteers and everyone has a pretty good idea about who is where and when, and crew status is usually posted on a board. Nextels are also used to communicate status. We are fortunate in that we have several volunteers who are either career staff elsewhere, or work shifts that allow them to be in the station during daytime hours. Usually the Paramedic will team up with a volunteer Driver/EMT and they will run the EMS calls, leaving the career EMT to drive the first-out engine.

    If dispatched for a fire call in our local where the Engine AND Ambulance are due, the ambulance will follow the engine out the door. Upon arrival if it is a working fire, the Ambulance crew will act with the engine crew, or will perform truck company operations- ground ladders, open up, search, utilities, etc. Works great for us.
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    Quote Originally Posted by RoofTopTrucky View Post
    My argument is what good is all of the extras when your transporting PTs to the hospital.
    I think when you see vehicles like that, the department is looking to meet the needs of their community. They might have a lack of personnel, or such limited funds that they can't afford a new pumper, so they spec an unusual ambulance when they purchase it.

    I don't think it would work in a lot of places, but I have faith that the purchaser asked themselves these questions before they ordered the vehicle.
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    2 of our 3 medic units have scba and hand tools on them, towns to the west and north also have them.

    Our department runs 5 full time FF/Medics with 3 on the engine and 2 on the medic. Dept to the west is similar except with 7 per shift. Dept to the north is POC and only staffs a medic unit during the day with 2, they are first response to every call in their jurisdiction with the medic unit.
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    Quote Originally Posted by BoxAlarm187 View Post
    I think when you see vehicles like that, the department is looking to meet the needs of their community. They might have a lack of personnel, or such limited funds that they can't afford a new pumper, so they spec an unusual ambulance when they purchase it.

    I don't think it would work in a lot of places, but I have faith that the purchaser asked themselves these questions before they ordered the vehicle.
    I believe the design is based more on (perceived) need than money issues.

    This service operates their own "heavy" rescue, but I don't believe it's staffed 24/7 and relies on "home response" for staffing when needed a lot of the time. In addition to their Rescue, several of the volunteer fire departments in their response area operate large Rescue-Engines.

    It's my understanding that part of the reason for the design was their own staffing issues with their Rescue and slow responses from the VFDs at times. The thinking being to be able to "pop a door" or be able to suppress a vehicle fire threatening a patient if necessary instead of having to wait for the other units to crew and respond.

    We'll just have to wait and see how it works out.

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