1. #1
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    May 1999
    Location
    Here, There, Everywhere
    Posts
    4,191

    Default Firefighter Lauded for Rescue With ‘No Margin for Error’ in Queens

    NY Times

    June 28, 2009
    Firefighter Lauded for Rescue With ‘No Margin for Error’ in Queens
    By AL BAKER

    It was the kind of mission that certain New York firefighters are routinely called upon to perform: punching holes in the windows above and around a blaze.

    But in a series of daring and graceful moves at a fire in Queens on Saturday morning, Firefighter Brian V. Moritz pulled off one of the more extraordinary search-and-rescue efforts his colleagues and superiors in the Fire Department said they had ever seen.

    “The rescue that he made was a difficult rescue,” said Lt. Dominick Michelli, who helped in the operations. “He used ingenuity.”

    When firefighters arrived at 83-28 Dongan Avenue in Elmhurst about 9:20 a.m., flames were blowing from the second-floor bedroom windows in the back of the wood-frame house, and smoke was billowing upward, fire officials said.

    Residents said that people were still inside the house, and that “there were jumpers in the rear,” said Firefighter Hugh Giffords, a department spokesman. Carrying a pry bar with several points, called a Halligan tool, plus a 6-foot hook, and a 24-foot metal ladder, Firefighter Moritz, 31, of Ladder Company 138, raced down an alley beside the house. He was what is known as the outside vent man — responsible for releasing smoke and steam from a burning structure as firefighters inside aim water at the flames. But he was also looking for people inside, the fire officials said.

    Wearing more than 100 pounds of equipment, Firefighter Moritz climbed up to a setback — a small roof off the main roof. There, he noticed a household ladder that was perched at a 70-degree angle and led to the attic.

    The firefighter went up the second ladder, smashed the attic window with his tools, climbed inside and found a man lying unconscious on the floor.

    “He had to move such a big person by himself,” said Firefighter Michael Prior, a union delegate with Ladder 138. “He climbed through the attic window and the person was too big to get out that window, so he got him down the hallway to a stairway.”

    Using his radio, he called for assistance, said James Long, a department spokesman.

    Within moments, firefighters from Ladder Company 154 and other units came racing up interior stairs in the house and took the man safely down to the street, where paramedics with the city’s Emergency Medical Service were waiting.

    Firefighter Prior said the victim was revived at the scene.

    Officials identified the man as Chris Fuller, 33, and said he had been taken to Elmhurst Hospital Center. Firefighters said they also rescued a pregnant woman, Jackie Onganeda, 27. She was taken to the same hospital.

    “He made a nice move,” Firefighter Giffords said of Firefighter Moritz, adding that he was told of the details by Lieutenant Michelli. “What makes it a nice grab is that the second ladder is at a 70-degree angle — there’s no margin for error. And as he was climbing, he encountered heavy smoke drafting up.”

    When the job was over, Firefighter Moritz, who joined the department in 2003, was also taken to Elmhurst for treatment of a sprained knee.

    FTM-PTB

  2. #2
    Forum Member
    CrnkB8's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    217

    Thumbs up Nice "Job"

    This is what it's all about. Glad to see his efforts (and instinct) paid off. Was it actually an attic or converted apartment/room?

  3. #3
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    332

    Default

    Funny, I remember a thread about how a 24foot ladder raise should be a 2-man job

    Outstanding rescue!!!

  4. #4
    Truckie
    SPFDRum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 1999
    Location
    St Paul, MN
    Posts
    2,516

    Default

    Now that's a fireman!!!! Top notch work by FDNY.
    Amazing what can be accomplished when not standing outside posing under the guise of risk assessment, and learn such advance firefighting skills as throwing a ladder......
    My posts reflect my views and opinions, not the organization I work for or my IAFF local. Some of which they may not agree. I.A.C.O.J. member
    "I ask, Sir, what is the militia? It is the whole people. To disarm the people is the best and most effectual way to enslave them."
    George Mason
    Co-author of the Second Amendment
    during Virginia's Convention to Ratify the Constitution, 1788
    Elevator Rescue Information

  5. #5
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Jul 1999
    Location
    Flanders, NJ
    Posts
    13,537

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SPFDRum View Post
    Now that's a fireman!!!! Top notch work by FDNY.
    Amazing what can be accomplished when not standing outside posing under the guise of risk assessment, and learn such advance firefighting skills as throwing a ladder......
    Yeah, but using a civilian ladder is an unsafe act. It is not worth the risk. Also, its almost certain that no one would ever be in the attic, so entering the attic is an unsafe risk as well.

    DOn't you think that this fire fighter is a reckless cowboy and not a hero? After all, what did he REALLY accomplish for all his risk?
    PROUD, HONORED AND HUMBLED RECIPIENT OF THE PURPLE HYDRANT AWARD - 10/2007.

  6. #6
    Forum Member
    FWDbuff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Pee-Ayy!
    Posts
    7,412

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SPFDRum View Post
    Now that's a fireman!!!! Top notch work by FDNY.
    Amazing what can be accomplished when not standing outside posing under the guise of risk assessment, and learn such advance firefighting skills as throwing a ladder......
    Well what I want to know, is if this family had installed and maintained smoke detectors, and if not, why this guy risked his life?
    "Loyalty Above all Else. Except Honor."

  7. #7
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    mountain view, AR
    Posts
    144

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgeWendtCFI View Post
    Yeah, but using a civilian ladder is an unsafe act. It is not worth the risk. Also, its almost certain that no one would ever be in the attic, so entering the attic is an unsafe risk as well.

    DOn't you think that this fire fighter is a reckless cowboy and not a hero? After all, what did he REALLY accomplish for all his risk?
    YES, and what he accomplished was saving someone who probably would have died otherwise. Kinda what our job is suppose to be.

  8. #8
    Forum Member
    FWDbuff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Pee-Ayy!
    Posts
    7,412

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by allison20 View Post
    YES, and what he accomplished was saving someone who probably would have died otherwise. Kinda what our job is suppose to be.
    (allison.....george is being sarcastic, but don't tell anyone....so am I for that matter.....but don't tell anyone.....)
    "Loyalty Above all Else. Except Honor."

  9. #9
    Forum Member
    MemphisE34a's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Memphis, TN - USA
    Posts
    2,526

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FFFRED View Post
    “He made a nice move,” Firefighter Giffords said of Firefighter Moritz, adding that he was told of the details by Lieutenant Michelli. “What makes it a nice grab is that the second ladder is at a 70-degree angle — there’s no margin for error.
    I am not knocking the job well done, but I don't get it. The standard angle for the "perfect" ladder raise is 75 degrees. 70 degrees would lessen the climbing angle making it not so straight up or in essence a bit easier.

    What am I missing? Someone enlighten me.
    RK
    cell #901-494-9437

    Management is making sure things are done right. Leadership is doing the right thing. The fire service needs alot more leaders and a lot less managers.

    "Everyone goes home" is the mantra for the pussification of the modern, American fire service.


    Comments made are my own. They do not represent the official position or opinion of the Fire Department or the City for which I am employed. In fact, they are normally exactly the opposite.

  10. #10
    Forum Member
    DeputyChiefGonzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Somewhere between genius and insanity!
    Posts
    13,584

    Default

    A certain "person" will chime in shortly. despite not being named ....

    A tip of the Leather to Firefighter Brian Moritz!
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
    Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

  11. #11
    Forum Member
    MEck51's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    South Jersey
    Posts
    444

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MemphisE34a View Post
    I am not knocking the job well done, but I don't get it. The standard angle for the "perfect" ladder raise is 75 degrees. 70 degrees would lessen the climbing angle making it not so straight up or in essence a bit easier.

    What am I missing? Someone enlighten me.
    I believe it may be for (and I am guessing here) the roof was probably pretty crappy and not the ideal surface for setting up, maybe having to worry about the feet just pushing thru roof. Or maybe since it kinda sounds like the ladder was left outside it may have just been a crappy ladder that you wouldn't want to be on in the first place after all most household ladders aren't rated for more than 200-250 lbs, a little light for a lot of guys I know dressed out. Just guesses of course.
    And in conclusion nice job to the crews involved.

  12. #12
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Cupcake NY
    Posts
    1,327

    Default

    138 gets a ton of actually occupied work, as opposed to occupied but no one being home. I wonder if he singed his tail on this one lol

  13. #13
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    2,959

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by flipper123 View Post
    Funny, I remember a thread about how a 24foot ladder raise should be a 2-man job
    2-men or 1 firefighter.

    Outstanding rescue!!!
    I concur, good job on the grab!

  14. #14
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    May 1999
    Location
    Here, There, Everywhere
    Posts
    4,191

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jonnyirons2 View Post
    138 gets a ton of actually occupied work, as opposed to occupied but no one being home. I wonder if he singed his tail on this one lol
    All those furry little animals in Queens keeping busy....Tiger Roof to Tiger....Grrrrr.

    FTM-PTB

  15. #15
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    2,439

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FireMedic049 View Post
    2-men or 1 firefighter.
    What about 2 firefighters....OR......1 truck monkey !
    "They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety." -- Benjamin Franklin

  16. #16
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Cupcake NY
    Posts
    1,327

    Default

    you have it all wrong! It is one man, two firefighters!

  17. #17
    Forum Member
    johnny46's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    2,094

    Default

    I saved a chihuahua, once with a really cool one-handed scooping maneuver.
    Logic and proportion have fallen sloppy dead.

  18. #18
    MembersZone Subscriber
    ffbam24's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,482

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgeWendtCFI View Post
    Yeah, but using a civilian ladder is an unsafe act. It is not worth the risk. Also, its almost certain that no one would ever be in the attic, so entering the attic is an unsafe risk as well.

    DOn't you think that this fire fighter is a reckless cowboy and not a hero? After all, what did he REALLY accomplish for all his risk?
    I didn't personally see the second ladder that was used. However the upper floor wasn't an attic per se but a third floor apartment.

    Nice stop by the brothers and nice grab.

  19. #19
    Forum Member
    DennisTheMenace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Washington, DC/Northern Virginia
    Posts
    3,717

    Default

    Nice save!
    Be for Peace, but don't be for the Enemy!
    -Big Russ

    Learn from the mistakes of others; you won't live long enough to make them all yourself.

    Quote Originally Posted by nyckftbl View Post
    LOL....dont you people have anything else to do besides b*tch about our b*tching?

  20. #20
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    57

    Default Nice grab

    How ever he did it, it was a nice grab. Hope it lands him on the steps of City Hall next June. And even if it doesn't, there will be one person forever grateful - the person he saved.

    And yeah "perfect ladder angle" and "blah-blah-blah-textbook-raise" NEVER takes into account the two trees, 8 electrical cables, 4 satellite dishes and the nest of rabid squirrels in between the ground and your objective with that ladder. Not to mention the billowing smoke and the occasional self-venting fire just as you're going up.
    Last edited by CDean1262; 06-29-2009 at 11:47 AM.

  21. #21
    55 Years & Still Rolling
    hwoods's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Glenn Dale Md, Heart of the P.G. County Fire Belt....
    Posts
    10,739

    Thumbs up Yep............

    First, A Tip'O the Leather to Brian for a Job Well Done!! .....

    George, did anyone find out if the second Ladder mentioned met NFPA Standards for Portable Ground Ladders?? ...........................
    Never use Force! Get a Bigger Hammer.
    In memory of
    Chief Earle W. Woods, 1912 - 1997
    Asst. Chief John R. Woods Sr. 1937 - 2006

    IACOJ Budget Analyst

    I Refuse to be a Spectator. If I come to the Game, I'm Playing.

    www.gdvfd18.com

  22. #22
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Dickey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    5,111

    Default

    Oh you guys are terrible......I laughed my arse off!!!


    Great job FF Moritz!
    What a grab!
    Jason Knecht
    Assistant Chief
    Altoona Fire Dept.
    Altoona, WI

    IACOJ - Director of Cheese and Whine
    http://www.cheddarvision.tv/
    EAT CHEESE OR DIE!!

  23. #23
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Jul 1999
    Location
    Flanders, NJ
    Posts
    13,537

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hwoods View Post
    First, A Tip'O the Leather to Brian for a Job Well Done!! .....

    George, did anyone find out if the second Ladder mentioned met NFPA Standards for Portable Ground Ladders?? ...........................
    I just assumed that, based on all the reckless nonsense that went on at this fire, that it did not meet the standard. I could see the risk if there were like, 3 people trapped. But one person? No way.
    PROUD, HONORED AND HUMBLED RECIPIENT OF THE PURPLE HYDRANT AWARD - 10/2007.

  24. #24
    Forum Member
    johnny46's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    2,094

    Default

    What if everyone liked the guy?
    Logic and proportion have fallen sloppy dead.

  25. #25
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Jul 1999
    Location
    Flanders, NJ
    Posts
    13,537

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by johnny46 View Post
    What if everyone liked the guy?
    How would you determine that? By the time you canvased enough people to make an educated guess whether, in fact, "everyone" liked him, the fire would be worse. Since, in reality, there is no one on earth that "everyone" likes, it would just be easier to make the assumption that the guy was a schmuck and fight the fire from the outside. Too much to risk.
    PROUD, HONORED AND HUMBLED RECIPIENT OF THE PURPLE HYDRANT AWARD - 10/2007.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Error on polygraph report- question
    By RobHodge in forum Hiring & Employment Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-25-2007, 11:01 AM
  2. It's a human error. We're not squirrels.
    By MalahatTwo7 in forum The Off Duty Forums
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-23-2005, 11:09 AM
  3. Error logging in and other sign in problems
    By RspctFrmCalgary in forum Firehouse.Com Site Comments
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 09-08-2005, 12:07 AM
  4. An error in a skill sheet based on IFSTA?
    By rmoore in forum University of Extrication
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 05-17-2005, 11:13 AM
  5. Margin of Error
    By gooch1977 in forum Hiring & Employment Discussion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 06-03-2003, 08:57 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Log in

Click here to log in or register