1. #1
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    Default Gear drying at home?

    Been looking at the different systems for drying gear. In my Dept. we get issued or buy our own gear, either way we are the ones responsible for it. As such I have been looking at different driers and racks suitable for use in the home/garage of a typical FF.

    Anyone used some of the standalone units like the Dry Guy or others that dry one set of gear in a small space?
    I've been toying with the idea of making a unit myself. Using some stainless tubing, a couple of pancake fans for air movement and possibly a heating element as well. Figured that one set of tubes welded like a coat hanger, with two uprights for the bunkers under them would probably work (sort of a skeletal manikin)

    One of the big drying cabinets would be nice BUT we don't have the room at the present for that.

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    Ummmm.......Errrrrr.......Ahhhhhhh............

    The hooks on my wall work just fine for me. But if you want to spend all kinds of money, I'll tell you what......I'll go to Lowes, buy three or four of them, plus a can of Krylon "Fire Safety Red" or "Safety Yellow" or "Lime Green" (you specify the color) and I will custom fabricate you your own personal set of "OFFICIAL Volunteer Fire Department Gear Drying Wall Hooks." And, tell you what....I'll even throw in free shipping. And, if you buy tonight, tonight only, buy one get one free!

    Your cost- the low low price of $48.50! But remember, act now to get two for the price of one, and free shipping!

    Disclaimer: Why on god's green earth would you 1. Spend money on something like a clothes dryer when a hook on the wall and the air god is providing will work just fine, and 2. Why would you spend your own personal money when your VFD should be providing the facilities for gear maintenance?
    "Loyalty Above all Else. Except Honor."

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    Just hang it up, and keep it out of direct sunlight.

    If there isn't good ventilation, open a window, and plug in a pedestal or box fan.

    And make sure it's done dripping if you decide to bring it inside.
    The American people will never knowingly adopt Socialism. But under the name of 'liberalism' they will adopt every fragment of the Socialist program, until one day America will be a Socialist nation, without knowing how it happened. --Norman Mattoon Thomas, 6 time presidential candidate for the Socialist Party of America

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    I'm sure you could make something out of pvc, etc.

    Sounds like a fun project!
    I am now a past chief and the views, opinions, and comments are mine and mine alone. I do not speak for any department or in any official capacity. Although, they would be smart to listen to me.

    "The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on the list."

    "When tempted to fight fire with fire, remember that the Fire Department usually uses water."

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    Leave that garbage at the firehouse to dry. Don't bring that junk in to your home!

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    Quote Originally Posted by jonnyirons2 View Post
    Leave that garbage at the firehouse to dry. Don't bring that junk in to your home!
    I agree with leaving it in the station when at all possible...don't bring the contaminates home. On occasion when I do have to bring it home due to me being out on detail the next shift, it only rides in the rear of my truck, it only stays in the garage, and if it's wet it hangs where my kids can't get to it. It's preferrable to leave it in the station though.

    I went out and bought an expensive commercially made gear drying rack and I'm glad I did. I can also use it to get up and clean my gutters, to climb up and store stuff in the attic, to paint walls over head, the list of wonderful uses goes on and on. In my area we call it a STEPLADDER!!

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    RK
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    Management is making sure things are done right. Leadership is doing the right thing. The fire service needs alot more leaders and a lot less managers.

    "Everyone goes home" is the mantra for the pussification of the modern, American fire service.


    Comments made are my own. They do not represent the official position or opinion of the Fire Department or the City for which I am employed. In fact, they are normally exactly the opposite.

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    put a broom stick through the sleeves and hang the broom stick parallel to the ground. keeps the coat open.

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    Leaving it at the station is not a good option for most of our crew. We have 2 stations and depending on the location of the call you may not go to your gear, or even to the station!

    Air drying works BUT it takes 2 days or longer depending on the air temperature and humidity. Not a good thing when your on duty 24/7/365.

    I was thinking that the units I was looking at would probably do the job in 2 hours or so. It only seems logical that heated air being blown through the gear would dry it faster and limit the damage that can come from the moisture.

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    Right about now, I'm feeling pretty fortunate. A number of years ago the officers in my department recognized a problem with bringing gear home to be washed in the home machine. We purchased a used machine and dryer for the station. It has been upgraded through the years, but is really the only way that gear should be cleaned.
    To echo Mr. Irons..NEVER take the stuff home and clean it.!!! You think you know what you were working in, but simple harmless things change their spots when they pass through heat and flame. Please, all you firefighters, don't expose your family to Methyl-Ethyl-BadSh** by contaminating your home environment. Drying can be done quite effectively by using the broom handle technique. Can even be speeded up if you take the shelves out of your hose drying cabinet and hang the gear there with the dryer on.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doorbreaker View Post
    Leaving it at the station is not a good option for most of our crew. We have 2 stations and depending on the location of the call you may not go to your gear, or even to the station!

    Air drying works BUT it takes 2 days or longer depending on the air temperature and humidity. Not a good thing when your on duty 24/7/365.

    I was thinking that the units I was looking at would probably do the job in 2 hours or so. It only seems logical that heated air being blown through the gear would dry it faster and limit the damage that can come from the moisture.
    oo in that case I have a simple answer. A coat hanger and your FD buys you a second set.

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    If only it was a perfect world.

    It's not a crime to dry your gear out at home in the garage.
    I am now a past chief and the views, opinions, and comments are mine and mine alone. I do not speak for any department or in any official capacity. Although, they would be smart to listen to me.

    "The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on the list."

    "When tempted to fight fire with fire, remember that the Fire Department usually uses water."

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    I understand your situation. Air drying away from direct sunlight is best. If you're using heated air currents, most PPE manufacturers’ and NFPA recommend not exceeding 110 degrees Fahrenheit. Here is a brochure from a manufacturer of gear drying cabinets (it costs about $7,000). Maybe it'll give you some ideas.

    http://www.unimac.com/adv_pdf/au08-205.pdf

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    Default I have contomplated this idea

    Using 1 1/2" pvc, construct a manequin of some sorts, with 1/4" holes drilled throughout, and a forced air system of some kind, this might just work.

    Maybe, maybe not, just an idea

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    Quote Originally Posted by whfd930 View Post
    Using 1 1/2" pvc, construct a manequin of some sorts, with 1/4" holes drilled throughout, and a forced air system of some kind, this might just work.

    Maybe, maybe not, just an idea
    We have something like that laying around one of our stations. It is basically has a shoulder shape "T" post to hold up the coat and then large "I" posts for the pants and smaller posts for boots and gloves, all 1" or so PVC with 1/8-1/4" in holes drilled every few inches and all of it connects to a small 110-115V electric blower fan. It aint fancy but it works.

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    It as been widely recognized that washing at home any kind of work cloth extends to the family the occupational risk associated to contaminants and chemical products.
    One example above other: asbestos.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Giovanni012 View Post
    It as been widely recognized that washing at home any kind of work cloth extends to the family the occupational risk associated to contaminants and chemical products.
    One example above other: asbestos.
    Except the OP didn't mention washing it at home, only drying it.

    ???

    .
    I am now a past chief and the views, opinions, and comments are mine and mine alone. I do not speak for any department or in any official capacity. Although, they would be smart to listen to me.

    "The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on the list."

    "When tempted to fight fire with fire, remember that the Fire Department usually uses water."

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    When I have to dry my instructor gear I turn it inside out and hang it on the clothes line. On a good sunny day it is dry in about 2 or 3 hours. The shell is not exposed to direct sunlight.

    Frankly, I have spent more time standing out in the sun wearing my gear than it has spent hanging on the line exposed to sun. The few hours hanging in the sun to dry will not damage your gear, it is leaving it exposed to the sun for days, weeks, or months that causes that damage. Like hanging it it a locker that the suns shines on constantly at work. Or the guy on the neioghboring department who hung his in the back window of his pick-up truck and faded all the color out of his coat in about 6 months. It's extremes people. Short term sun to dry is not an issue.

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    Drying at home pose the same risk as washing it, unless you are really confident that your washing process acts as a true decontamination.

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    I agree with those guys. I dont even wear my uniforms home or my station shoes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Giovanni012 View Post
    Drying at home pose the same risk as washing it, unless you are really confident that your washing process acts as a true decontamination.
    Sure, I would recommend not licking your turnouts ever.
    I am now a past chief and the views, opinions, and comments are mine and mine alone. I do not speak for any department or in any official capacity. Although, they would be smart to listen to me.

    "The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on the list."

    "When tempted to fight fire with fire, remember that the Fire Department usually uses water."

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    if your FD has gear washing facilities, get them to pony up for the gear drying equipment if they already don't.

    Reason behind it being if your gear is wet its OOS, so it doesn't matter if its at home, the firehouse, or the moon, you shouldn't be wearing it to calls. Have the FD buy the dryer, you can either wait for it to dry or leave and come back for it. Commercial dryers should be able to dry it (relatively quickly) and without damaging it. Its also cheaper for them to buy the equipment for all to use, rather than having every member buy/construct their own set up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nameless View Post
    if your FD has gear washing facilities, get them to pony up for the gear drying equipment if they already don't.

    Reason behind it being if your gear is wet its OOS, so it doesn't matter if its at home, the firehouse, or the moon, you shouldn't be wearing it to calls. Have the FD buy the dryer, you can either wait for it to dry or leave and come back for it. Commercial dryers should be able to dry it (relatively quickly) and without damaging it. Its also cheaper for them to buy the equipment for all to use, rather than having every member buy/construct their own set up.
    You do realize that their are fire departments in this country who can barely afford diesel fuel for the apparatus, right?

    We are fortunate to have state of the art gear washing/drying equipment. It's not cheap.
    I am now a past chief and the views, opinions, and comments are mine and mine alone. I do not speak for any department or in any official capacity. Although, they would be smart to listen to me.

    "The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on the list."

    "When tempted to fight fire with fire, remember that the Fire Department usually uses water."

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChiefKN View Post
    You do realize that their are fire departments in this country who can barely afford diesel fuel for the apparatus, right?

    We are fortunate to have state of the art gear washing/drying equipment. It's not cheap.

    *GASP* You mean money is tight?!?!? I never imagined.

    It's just a suggestion there chief. Let him decide the viability of it or not. Now go sit in the buggy and fill out some command worksheets.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nameless View Post
    *GASP* You mean money is tight?!?!? I never imagined.

    It's just a suggestion there chief. Let him decide the viability of it or not. Now go sit in the buggy and fill out some command worksheets.
    Money is beyond tight.

    I ride the BRT, no more Fire SUV for me.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kSiwoKCiy-s
    I am now a past chief and the views, opinions, and comments are mine and mine alone. I do not speak for any department or in any official capacity. Although, they would be smart to listen to me.

    "The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on the list."

    "When tempted to fight fire with fire, remember that the Fire Department usually uses water."

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