1. #1
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    Default Certified Instructors?

    So I have been a HazMat Technician now going on 9 years. I have completed my IFSAC 88 hour technician level certification and have maintained it ever since. Like everybody else, I have attended and completed many other courses relating to hazmat and have even been responsible for providing training to others.
    My question is: What makes a HazMat Instructor a "certified" HazMat Instructor? My current job (private sector) is requesting me to conduct hazmat training. I am comfortable teaching it, but to whose standards have I been certified to? Is my employer my certifier? I have looked at many different companies that provide training and nobody has a "certified" hazmat title beside their names.

    Appreciate the help!

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    That probably depends on the certifying authority in your state. In Missouri, the Division of Fire Safety is who issues the IFSAC certifications, so they are responsible for who is/isn't a "certified" instructor.

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    Would that be the case even for a private sector company?

    Thanks for the reply!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bryan5871 View Post
    Would that be the case even for a private sector company?

    Thanks for the reply!
    That I'm not sure about. You might check with your local LEPC on how private industry training is handled in your area.

    OSHA has some information within CFR 1910.120, but I haven't dealt with the private sector stuff much.

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    OSHA doesn't certify instructors. A state level entity (or a municapal or industrial department) may require a specific course to be completed but for the most part, it's based on level achieved and experience.

    Mostly a train the trainer or similiar course is a good thing to have.

    The "Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response" standard (HAZWOPER), 29 CFR 1910.120, states in paragraph (e)(5) that "Trainers shall be qualified to instruct employees about the subject matter that is being presented in training". In addition, 29 CFR 1910.120(e)(5) explains that the qualifications of the instructors may be shown by academic degrees, completed training courses and/or work experience.

    At this time, OSHA does not have any specific requirements to certify an instructor. The subjects that trainers should be able to convey to employees at hazardous waste operations who need training are summarized in paragraphs (e), (p) and (q) of the HAZWOPER standard.

    Be safe, R2

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    Default Certified or Qualified?

    The main question to answer is who will the students be to determine the requirements for the instructor.

    This makes a difference because if they are public firefighters they will probably need to receive a certification from the state's fire training division/marshal. If this is the case then the instructor would need to meet their requirements for certification and possibly qualification. Some states only require that you have the certification that you are teaching, i.e. hazmat technician. Other states require that you have the certification plus a train the trainer certification. While still other states require you have the certification plus an instructor certification. Finally, some states require you to have the certification, the instructor certification, plus classes on required paperwork, and a minnimum number of hours helping to teach a class.

    If the class is for a private company not regulated by the state's fire division then you would follow the OSHA or EPA, depending on your state, requirements for instructors. The requirements are more lax here (for hazmat, as there are certifications for general industrial/construction safety instructors) as OSHA/EPA is not a certifying authority like the fire division is. Therefore they do not set qualification or certification standards for instructors other than to say they need to cover specific material in the class, similar to NFPA JPR's. There is a recommended non-mandatory training curriculum in OSHA 1910.120 App E that includes the recommendations for instructors and training directors including continuing education requirements.
    Last edited by rescue542; 10-03-2009 at 05:48 AM. Reason: Misspelling
    Scott Van Boerum
    Battalion Chief - Training
    Green Valley Fire District
    Green Valley, AZ

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    "The main question to answer is who will the students be to determine the requirements for the instructor."

    I teach municipal and industrial... my thought is to teach the class based on the recquirements of the student. OSHA sets the level recquirements and then sets this is what you need to teach based on those level's with the recquirement that you are experienced and have achieved. So say I'm teaching a class to firefighters with a propylene facility in there response area. I teach stuff that pertains specifically to C3 as well as the OSHA mandates.

    Not sure how other entities do it but the recquirements that OSHA sets is required to be certified as that level. Other entities can add to or expand an area of the base recquirements but they cannot make a different class and call it the same. I do know that there is a municipal based class that meets the recquirements of OSHA and provides additional information. I can't recall the name of the class, I'll try to dig it up but I think it was something through IFSTA.

    Be safe, R2

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    Thanks, All. I have read and understand OSHA's requirements for an instructor as well as a State's ability to make the standard more restrictve. I was looking for somebody to confirm what I thought I already knew and what I was understanding while reading the CFR. This was very helpful.

    If anything else comes up that you might feel relevant, I would appreciate your help.

    Thanks and be safe out there.

    -B

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