1. #1
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    Default How much time do you have to get enroute?

    Some places want you on the road in under a minute from the time you are alerted to the call and some places just want you on the road "in a timely manner."

    What does your department require?
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    Day time 60 seconds and night time 90 seconds. Time starts when tones start going off.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rm1524 View Post
    Day time 60 seconds and night time 90 seconds. Time starts when tones start going off.
    Just curious, but why does it require you more time to get out at night?

    We have no written rule. Fire Department policy assumes that everyone will get out as soon as is possible.

    34-A policy - I don't like more than 45 seconds during the day, under 30 at night. Many times we are able to get out much faster.
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    Comments made are my own. They do not represent the official position or opinion of the Fire Department or the City for which I am employed. In fact, they are normally exactly the opposite.

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    Your turnout boots and trousers should be on the floor near to your riding position. The hood and coat goes on also if the dispatch is for a structure fire. They all go on before you mount the apparatus.

    You should be on the street in probably 1 to 1/2 minutes.
    Stay Safe and Well Out There....

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    Memphis -

    That is the max time. We are normally under that. They allow the extra to get out of bed and get dressed.

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    COT - That would be great, but for us we usually have more than one truck assigned to us, it depends on the type of call we get as to which truck we take. This month i'm the lucky one that has four trucks. Rescue (MVA only), tanker for non-hydrant areas, 2nd engine for hydrant areas, and a brush truck. Talk about a good time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rm1524 View Post
    COT - That would be great, but for us we usually have more than one truck assigned to us, it depends on the type of call we get as to which truck we take. This month i'm the lucky one that has four trucks. Rescue (MVA only), tanker for non-hydrant areas, 2nd engine for hydrant areas, and a brush truck. Talk about a good time.
    Nothing like a game of musical firetrucks.

    We are a volly department, on our shift nights we usually have 4 people at the station at all times. We have 5 different trucks you might be on based on the type of call.
    "They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety." -- Benjamin Franklin

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    We're combo with a 4 person crew on. One capt and 3 engineers. The capt. is on every first out truck and the three drivers rotate spots each month. Next month I will be med truck driver, firefighter, and brush truck driver. After that I get a month of easy living, engine driver only.

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    We have no formal or written policy that gives a time frame. If we don't acknowledge the receipt of alarm in quarters after thirty seconds, the alarm bureau contacts us by phone.

    We try to get out of quarters as quickly as possible.

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    1 minute in daytime, 2 minutes at night.

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    We're expected to get out the door in 60 seconds or less, 80% of the time.
    The American people will never knowingly adopt Socialism. But under the name of 'liberalism' they will adopt every fragment of the Socialist program, until one day America will be a Socialist nation, without knowing how it happened. --Norman Mattoon Thomas, 6 time presidential candidate for the Socialist Party of America

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    nothing written but 90 seconds after the tones drop the dispatcher starts calling on the air, by 120 seconds the phone in the station starts to ring.

    So it is in our best interest to push out in under 90.

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    no rule, but we try to go as quickly as possible.

    Its really the easiest and safest way to cut your response times.

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    90 seconds daytime and 2 minutes at night.

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    well day time 7 minutes night time 9 minutes ( hard to fine clothes in dark LOL )

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    No department policy here. We're at a geographical disadvantage in our current station as we're upstairs and at the opposite end of a police/fire/courts multi-use building from the apparatus. As a result, I would call 90 seconds at night as an average. Daytime depends on where we are in the station.

    We're splitting our companies into two stations later this year and moving downstairs. So, we'll soon have dang near instantaneous response during the day and will cut out nighttime turn-out time in half. Of course, we'll probably need someone to slap the driver a few times to make sure he's awake before we roll.

    The one thing about my shift is that we're not of the "it's not my emergency so there is no need to hurry" mindset. If you can't hustle in the station where you know all of the hazards... Why on earth would you run hot in traffic where you have no idea what you will encounter?

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    I believe that all of us have the goal of getting up and out as quickly as possible. However, take this one step further. What benchmark do you use to determine your response times? What I mean is the standard commonly used is 5 minutes on scene 80% of the time. Is that 5 minutes from time of dispatch or 5 minutes from time the call was received? We are having this debate within my department currently and we have been tracking times for every call on every shift for about two years. What we found thus far...

    Average time from the time the call was received and time of dispatch is about 2 1/2 minutes.

    Average response time from dispatch to enroute is about 1 minute 40 seconds.

    Average on scene time from time of dispatch varies greatly depending on the call (emergency vs non-emergency).

    When you add the call processing time to your actual response time, it may surprise you. Your 911 center plays a vital role in being efficient in getting the calls out.

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    Frosty -
    We went throught that a few years ago with our dispatch. They was getting all the information before they set tones off, this meant that at times they would have the call for 3 to 4 minutes before they dispatched as. They now shoot for under a minute from the time the call is recieved untill they dispatch us. They get the basic (type of call and address), dipatch us and then get the rest of the information while we are going enroute and update us as they get the rest.

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    Good point Frosty...

    Our dispatch center has to dispatch an EMS or fire call within 2 minutes of receiving it. If it goes over that 2 minute mark, then it is reviewed to see why. Sometimes you just can't avoid it with a slow or difficult caller, or the dispatcher has to play 20 questions to get the information out of the caller.

    Our department judges response time from the time of the alarm to the first unit on scene. A chief officer is considered a unit as well.
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    Quote Originally Posted by RFRDxplorer View Post
    Some places want you on the road in under a minute from the time you are alerted to the call and some places just want you on the road "in a timely manner."

    What does your department require?
    As quickly as you can pinch it off....TP shall be applied on way to truck.

    Oh wait, guess that's not what you meant.

    No requirements here. Call backs for units en route begin in 30-45 seconds from dispatch. You always hear the engine or siren in the background on all the units. It is expected that you get out ASAP! Most of our guys actually jog to their truck.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rm1524 View Post
    Frosty -
    We went throught that a few years ago with our dispatch. They was getting all the information before they set tones off, this meant that at times they would have the call for 3 to 4 minutes before they dispatched as. They now shoot for under a minute from the time the call is recieved untill they dispatch us. They get the basic (type of call and address), dipatch us and then get the rest of the information while we are going enroute and update us as they get the rest.
    We realized this early on in our study that some of our call processing times were exceeding 4-5 minutes. The number one call that took the most time to process.....cardiac events! We worked with dispatch to improve these times and it has been a long and slow process. Our comm center is under the Sheriff and we are now pushing to to change this. We question every call that exceeds more than two minutes to process.

    Another issue that we found is that the modems on our MDC's need to be adjusted and "tuned" on a regular basis. This action alone improved our times by more than 30 seconds on the average.

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    Talking Response times

    We are an all volunteer department with no personal on station. The dispatch center allows us 5 minutes to mark enroute before they start dispatching other companies to respond to the incident. When everyone responds from home we average 2 minutes from time of dispatch to marking enroute and 1 minute when setting on station. From time of dispatch to first apparatus marking on scene averages 6 minutes. We do pretty good for an all rural department that has 1 station to cover 52 square miles.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frosty42 View Post
    When you add the call processing time to your actual response time, it may surprise you. Your 911 center plays a vital role in being efficient in getting the calls out.
    In our case, that's the downside of working for a small department. Many times, we only have one person on duty in communications. Based on speculation only, I imagine this results in longer times between the 911 call and the dispatch than in departments where there is a dispatcher and a call taker.

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    We have no set times, but once in a while we'll look at the times when checking on overall response time. For us the overall response time starts when 911 is answered and closes when our first staffed unit arrives. Our monthly response time average has been around 4:30 for the last 4-5 years.

    Some factors:
    1. our crews are "working" throughout the day portion of the tour.
    2. None of our guys wears their bunker pants throughout the day. Our personnel fully dress out before boarding the apparatus.
    3. Due to short staffing personnel may be on the ambulance, the engine or truck all in the same tour, so gear placement is rarely optimal.
    4. Some guys still actually sleep in beds not the recliners so their turnout time at night includes one or two more steps.

    But, in the end for 22 sq. miles we cover emergency runs on average within 4:30 from 911 to onscene. Of course it's rarely fast enough for the victims.

  25. #25
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    Work - 45 seconds daytime, 2 minutes at night.

    VFD - 5 minutes, as we rarely have staffed stations due to call volume.

    A nearby career department has FOUR minutes to respond after dispatch - and these are staffed stations!
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