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  1. #1
    Forum Member firecat1's Avatar
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    Default For Remembrance Day

    ..............
    Last edited by firecat1; 01-13-2010 at 06:27 AM.


  2. #2
    Forum Member firecat1's Avatar
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    Default

    In response to pm---Sorry, that's Veteran's Day for "South of the Border".

  3. #3
    MembersZone Subscriber MalahatTwo7's Avatar
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    Arrow We will remember them

    {Borrowed from The Lookout, CFB Esquimalt base paper}

    The story behind two minutes of silence
    WHAT SAY YOU

    BC / Yukon Command www.bcyuk.legion.ca www.legionlegacies.org

    When the guns fell silent on the First World War battlefields and the Armistice
    was signed at the 11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918, this
    sacred moment in history was embraced as Armistice Day. As Britain and its Commonwealth Dominions began planning Armistice Day services for the following year, an Australian journalist proposed in a letter, that a respectful silence to remember the fallen be included in the ceremonies. This letter, scribed by Edward George Honey, was published on May 8, 1919, in the
    London Evening News and brought to the attention of His Majesty King George V.

    On Nov. 8, 1919, His Majesty King George V proclaimed...

    “...all locomotion should cease, so that, in perfect stillness, the thoughts of everyone may be concentrated on reverent remembrance of the glorious dead...”

    Some historians believe the tradition of the silence was in honour of the last soldier killed before the Armistice: Pte George Price, a Canadian. Pte Price was killed in action by the last shot of the Great War, two minutes before the guns fell silent. In Mons, France, at the ornate Grand Place, a commemorative
    plaque honours the memory of Pte Price. He is buried at Saint Symphorien
    Cemetery in Mons.

    This silent observance was incorporated into the first Armistice Day service held on Nov. 11, 1919, in Britain and the Commonwealth Dominions. Following the Second World War, Armistice Day was renamed as Remembrance Day to
    honour the fallen from all wars, past, present and future. Over time, the silent observance was not consistently observed by all countries. In the year 2000, The Royal Canadian Legion and other Commonwealth nations rallied
    together to revitalize the significance of the silence observance and called for an international “Two Minute Wave of Silence.” Remembrance summons each generation to understand the finest of Canadian values: freedom, democracy, human dignity and caring for the greater good of mankind.

    {On this note, I was given cause to become upset. After yesterday's ceremony, I passed by the local public school located on the Base, just around the corner from my home. It had just struck noon, and kids were playing in the school yard. Kinda strange, kids being in school and especially on a working military base. Back when I was a boy, and even till I graduated, all schools in BC anyway, were closed on 11 November. I guess times really have changed. And then "They" ask: "Why does no one care to attend these ceremonies of rememberance?"

    I say, "Look to your school yards on 11 November and ask the kids."


    The Call

    Whenever the call of battle is sound
    and shots ring through the air
    A special breed of man is found
    to always be standing there
    He was there at Queenston Heights Niagra
    Falls
    when General Brock fought a greater foe
    With determination upon his face he stayed
    and he forced the Yanks to go
    He fought the Hun at Vimy
    at Frezenburg, Ypres and both battles of the
    Somme
    From his strength, his courage and his blood
    the war to end all wars was won
    He was there again from 1939 to 45
    to stop the Axis powers cold
    At Dieppe, Normandy, Sicily and Hong Kong
    again their story has been told
    When you hear names like Hill 355
    Imjin, Kapyong and Annebell
    You’ll know he was in the Korean War
    and again he went through hell
    And although there are but a few old soldiers
    left
    from those wars of long ago
    Their sons and daughters have now taken
    their place
    and have bravely answered the call to go
    Against the Warsaw Pact they stood strong
    throughout the 40 year long Cold War
    and helped to bring a measure of peace to the
    world
    when the Berlin Wall finally stood no more
    They have worn the helmet of UN blue
    with honour, and courage and with pride
    And they helped to bury many a comrade
    who have fallen by their side
    They are fighting now in Afghanistan
    against an enemy who knows no fear
    They fight to protect their buddies and our
    way of life
    for our brave young soldiers, their mission and
    duty are clear
    So on this November 11th, be proud you are
    a Canadian
    and remember all those who need to be
    Wear a poppy, salute your flag, then pray to
    God
    and give thanks that you’re still free

    MWO Stephen G Hitch****, CD


    The Canadian New Breed

    In Europe lie the hero’s of old,
    In Canada is where we grow cold.
    The struggle was never about me,
    We fight and die to make other countries
    free.
    We wear the tan, the green and the blue,
    But always we knew.
    That our lives may be offered for those in
    need,
    Never does another country need to plead.
    We are Canadians! The new breed!
    Keeping the peace, wearing blue for so
    long,
    Never caring which country was in the
    wrong.
    To stop conflict, is noble enough,
    But if tyranny appears we must be tough.
    A few of us perished in that quiet time,
    Now, dying in numbers our country pays
    us some mind.
    Praying to the keeper, our sisters and
    friends,
    We peacemakers only want wars to end.
    We are Canadians! The new breed!
    For NATO, NORAD, UN and Canada we
    have died,
    While others have watched, stood by and
    cried.
    Our families and friends, all wish an end,
    But, ‘tis late and our broken bodies will
    not mend.
    Our job never done, we cannot stay,
    We keep the torch John McCrae.
    We are not buried in Flanders field,
    Here, we lie in the Canadian Shield.
    We are Canadians! The new breed!

    SLt Tony Gatt
    Logistics Officers in MARPAC HQ

  4. #4
    MembersZone Subscriber
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MalahatTwo7 View Post
    {Borrowed from The Lookout, CFB Esquimalt base paper}

    The story behind two minutes of silence
    WHAT SAY YOU

    BC / Yukon Command www.bcyuk.legion.ca www.legionlegacies.org

    When the guns fell silent on the First World War battlefields and the Armistice
    was signed at the 11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918, this
    sacred moment in history was embraced as Armistice Day. As Britain and its Commonwealth Dominions began planning Armistice Day services for the following year, an Australian journalist proposed in a letter, that a respectful silence to remember the fallen be included in the ceremonies. This letter, scribed by Edward George Honey, was published on May 8, 1919, in the
    London Evening News and brought to the attention of His Majesty King George V.

    On Nov. 8, 1919, His Majesty King George V proclaimed...

    “...all locomotion should cease, so that, in perfect stillness, the thoughts of everyone may be concentrated on reverent remembrance of the glorious dead...”

    Some historians believe the tradition of the silence was in honour of the last soldier killed before the Armistice: Pte George Price, a Canadian. Pte Price was killed in action by the last shot of the Great War, two minutes before the guns fell silent. In Mons, France, at the ornate Grand Place, a commemorative
    plaque honours the memory of Pte Price. He is buried at Saint Symphorien
    Cemetery in Mons.

    This silent observance was incorporated into the first Armistice Day service held on Nov. 11, 1919, in Britain and the Commonwealth Dominions. Following the Second World War, Armistice Day was renamed as Remembrance Day to
    honour the fallen from all wars, past, present and future. Over time, the silent observance was not consistently observed by all countries. In the year 2000, The Royal Canadian Legion and other Commonwealth nations rallied
    together to revitalize the significance of the silence observance and called for an international “Two Minute Wave of Silence.” Remembrance summons each generation to understand the finest of Canadian values: freedom, democracy, human dignity and caring for the greater good of mankind.

    {On this note, I was given cause to become upset. After yesterday's ceremony, I passed by the local public school located on the Base, just around the corner from my home. It had just struck noon, and kids were playing in the school yard. Kinda strange, kids being in school and especially on a working military base. Back when I was a boy, and even till I graduated, all schools in BC anyway, were closed on 11 November. I guess times really have changed. And then "They" ask: "Why does no one care to attend these ceremonies of rememberance?"

    I say, "Look to your school yards on 11 November and ask the kids."


    The Call

    Whenever the call of battle is sound
    and shots ring through the air
    A special breed of man is found
    to always be standing there
    He was there at Queenston Heights Niagra
    Falls
    when General Brock fought a greater foe
    With determination upon his face he stayed
    and he forced the Yanks to go
    He fought the Hun at Vimy
    at Frezenburg, Ypres and both battles of the
    Somme
    From his strength, his courage and his blood
    the war to end all wars was won
    He was there again from 1939 to 45
    to stop the Axis powers cold
    At Dieppe, Normandy, Sicily and Hong Kong
    again their story has been told
    When you hear names like Hill 355
    Imjin, Kapyong and Annebell
    You’ll know he was in the Korean War
    and again he went through hell
    And although there are but a few old soldiers
    left
    from those wars of long ago
    Their sons and daughters have now taken
    their place
    and have bravely answered the call to go
    Against the Warsaw Pact they stood strong
    throughout the 40 year long Cold War
    and helped to bring a measure of peace to the
    world
    when the Berlin Wall finally stood no more
    They have worn the helmet of UN blue
    with honour, and courage and with pride
    And they helped to bury many a comrade
    who have fallen by their side
    They are fighting now in Afghanistan
    against an enemy who knows no fear
    They fight to protect their buddies and our
    way of life
    for our brave young soldiers, their mission and
    duty are clear
    So on this November 11th, be proud you are
    a Canadian
    and remember all those who need to be
    Wear a poppy, salute your flag, then pray to
    God
    and give thanks that you’re still free

    MWO Stephen G Hitch****, CD


    The Canadian New Breed

    In Europe lie the hero’s of old,
    In Canada is where we grow cold.
    The struggle was never about me,
    We fight and die to make other countries
    free.
    We wear the tan, the green and the blue,
    But always we knew.
    That our lives may be offered for those in
    need,
    Never does another country need to plead.
    We are Canadians! The new breed!
    Keeping the peace, wearing blue for so
    long,
    Never caring which country was in the
    wrong.
    To stop conflict, is noble enough,
    But if tyranny appears we must be tough.
    A few of us perished in that quiet time,
    Now, dying in numbers our country pays
    us some mind.
    Praying to the keeper, our sisters and
    friends,
    We peacemakers only want wars to end.
    We are Canadians! The new breed!
    For NATO, NORAD, UN and Canada we
    have died,
    While others have watched, stood by and
    cried.
    Our families and friends, all wish an end,
    But, ‘tis late and our broken bodies will
    not mend.
    Our job never done, we cannot stay,
    We keep the torch John McCrae.
    We are not buried in Flanders field,
    Here, we lie in the Canadian Shield.
    We are Canadians! The new breed!

    SLt Tony Gatt
    Logistics Officers in MARPAC HQ
    Thanks very much for posting this Rick. Yesterday, here in Nikolayev, 5 of us, 2 Canucks, an American, a Brit and a Kiwi all went to the war monument here and held our own service. Can't get poppys here but we each laid a red rose at the memorial.
    On another note, I believe in Alberta Nov 11 is still a stat holiday. I know my grandkids were all off from school.

  5. #5
    MembersZone Subscriber MalahatTwo7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
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    Thumbs up

    You're welcome, Bryan. And now for something slightly different:

    Toronto war vet fights off armed thief at poppy drive


    By Julianna Cummins, National Post November 12, 2009

    TORONTO — An attempt to steal cash from the annual poppy campaign in the Toronto-area Royal Canadian Legion was foiled Thursday by a Second World War veteran, 84, and a volunteer, 64.

    "I'm so proud. I am so proud. He's amazing," said Dianne Power of her father John Dietsch, the navy veteran who made a grab for the gunman's arm.

    "That is my father, believe me. He would take that very personally that this man would dare to come in and try to take . . . legion money," said Power.

    Late Thursday morning, a man in his mid-20s came into the Oak Ridge Legion, Branch 73, and went into the boardroom where money collected from poppy donation boxes was being counted, witnesses to the incident said.

    Dietsch said he immediately asked the stranger what he was doing there.

    "He said, 'give me all your bills,' " Dietsch said. At that point, he noticed the man had a gun and made a lunge for it.

    "I didn't quite reach it — I grabbed his arm, he pushed me and I fell backward," said Dietsch, who scraped his arm in the altercation.

    Then in came Earl Gray, 64, who wrestled the gunman to the floor as soon as he saw Dietsch was down.

    The man weaseled out of his grasp, but Gray said he followed him out through the parking lot and saw him disappear. About $10,000 was being counted in the boardroom and being prepared for a bank deposit.

    "There would've been a lot of people out of luck who the money goes to," said Gray, who never served in the army but is a 15-year legion member. The money collected from the poppy campaign goes toward numerous causes, including senior citizen services, bursaries and the building of affordable housing for seniors and veterans.

    Dietsch, looking out into the media scrum that descended upon the legion branch Thursday, said that he "didn't have time" to be frightened.

    "It was just reaction. I guess, subconsciously, it meant too much to me, the money we collected out tagging," said Dietsch. "I wasn't going to let him get away with what we worked so hard for."

    Pat Shone, 65, the chairman of the poppy campaign for the centre, was also in the boardroom at the time of the attempted robbery. She said she was also rushed to action as soon as she saw Dietsch go down.

    "He's a veteran, and nobody is going to hurt our veterans. I turned to go at the guy, even though he had a gun, and I didn't make it because Earl did," Shone said.

    Dietsch had some choice words for anyone who would try to steal from the veterans:

    "I would've punched his head in, if I had the opportunity."

    © Copyright (c) Canwest News Service

    PHOTOCREDIT:

    Legion members John Dietsch, right, and Earl Gray, left, sit in the Royal Canadian Legion Oakridge Branch 73 after apprehending a gunman who attempted to steal about $10,000 in poppy money on Thursday. Dietsch, who served with the Royal Canadian Navy from 1943-1946, tackled the suspect as he tried to flee this office, while Gray helped restrain the suspect.Photograph by: Aaron Vincent Elkaim, National Post
    Attached Images Attached Images  

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