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    Default Where to learn firefighting tools?

    I just joined a vol. fire department and they told me the best place to start is to learn the tools. I was wondering where can I start besides going to the firehouse to learn them I know thats the best way to learn them but I want to start by loking them over in a book or on the computer.
    Thanks

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    We supply our new members with a rookie glossary. Pictures and descriptions of all of our equipment. Unfortunately, I don't have an electronic copy I can pass along. This was created by one of our rookie's a few years back. Perhaps you could volunteer to work on a similar department with one of your department's more experienced members?

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    I also would like access to something like this. It would be nice to find one on the internet, but I have had no luck.

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    Here is a link to a site that the helped our rookie build the glossary that we use.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossar...ting_equipment

    Hope this helps!

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    http://www.youtube.com/results?searc...rch_type=&aq=f

    not sure how great these are, but you can decide for yourself.

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    Does your department have any of the Firefighter 1 training manuals (IFSTA Essentials, Fundamentals of Firefighting from Jones and Bartlett, etc.)? Or can you get your hands on one from somewhere else? That would probably be the best place to start.

    Also, once you find what they're called and what they're for, get out in the station and get your hands on them. Learn where they're located on your trucks.
    Chief Dwayne LeBlanc
    Paincourtville Volunteer Fire Department
    Paincourtville, LA

    "I have a dream. It's not a big dream, it's just a little dream. My dream and I hope you don't find this too crazy is that I would like the people of this community to feel that if, God forbid, there were a fire, calling the fire department would actually be a wise thing to do. You can't have people, if their houses are burning down, saying, 'Whatever you do, don't call the fire department!' That would be bad."
    C.D. Bales, "Roxanne"

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    Thanks a lot for the help, if I could get a list of tools that are used I think that I can l start looking them up one by one
    Thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by trojans15 View Post
    Thanks a lot for the help, if I could get a list of tools that are used I think that I can l start looking them up one by one
    Thanks
    Check out this link....

    http://cityofdavis.org/fire/tour/

    Neat virtual tour of a typical fire engine explaining what equipment is located on it and what it's used for. Kinda meant for civilians but since you're a noob it might be helpful to you.

    Some tools you might want to look up...

    Halligan tool
    Flathead axe
    Pickhead axe
    Pike Pole
    Roof hook
    K-tool
    Pry bar

    Those are hand tools, then you get into all sorts of power tools and hydraulic tools like chain saws, K-12 saw, hydraulic spreaders, that sort of stuff.

    (I'm sure I'll think of some others, if anyone has any other suggestions chime in...)

    Bear in mind, too, that some of the tools you find on the Internet or in textbooks might not be exactly the same tools your department uses. Different departments have their own preferences on what types or styles of tools to use, or different types of response issues that require a different tool, so some of the items might not even be found in your department. Or your department might have adopted a tool that's not generally used in the fire service. Again, get out in the station with an experienced senior member, go over YOUR trucks and get familiar with YOUR tools. That's the best way to learn.
    Last edited by dmleblanc; 12-20-2009 at 06:54 AM.
    Chief Dwayne LeBlanc
    Paincourtville Volunteer Fire Department
    Paincourtville, LA

    "I have a dream. It's not a big dream, it's just a little dream. My dream and I hope you don't find this too crazy is that I would like the people of this community to feel that if, God forbid, there were a fire, calling the fire department would actually be a wise thing to do. You can't have people, if their houses are burning down, saying, 'Whatever you do, don't call the fire department!' That would be bad."
    C.D. Bales, "Roxanne"

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    Knowing your tools is they key, however, knowing where your tools are is just as important. I tell our rookies they have 3 main jobs.

    1) Put your gear on correctly and quickly
    2) Hit the hydrant (after being taught how obviously)
    3) Know where every single tool is on every rig in your house, then work on the rigs from the other stations so your familiar.

    As far as knowing your tools, you best bet is to spend time at the firehouse and ask. Anyone you see there when you have questions, ask.

    Good luck and welcome

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    If you are just looking to learn basic hand tools and thier names, start here: http://www.thefirestore.com/store/ca.../cid_79_tools/
    Career Firefighter
    Volunteer Captain

    -Professional in Either Role-

    Quote Originally Posted by Rescue101 View Post
    I don't mind fire rolling over my head. I just don't like it rolling UNDER my a**.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frenchie477 View Post
    Knowing your tools is they key, however, knowing where your tools are is just as important. I tell our rookies they have 3 main jobs.

    1) Put your gear on correctly and quickly
    2) Hit the hydrant (after being taught how obviously)
    3) Know where every single tool is on every rig in your house, then work on the rigs from the other stations so your familiar.

    As far as knowing your tools, you best bet is to spend time at the firehouse and ask. Anyone you see there when you have questions, ask.

    Good luck and welcome

    I agree. When you're at the station, or if you take your gear home with you, put it on quickly and correctly, then take it off, repeat until as perfect as you can get. Learning to catch a hydrant properly is important for all obvious reasons. I made diagrams of our engines and our rescue truck that laid out where everything was located. And as was previously stated, get one of the paid guys or more experienced guys or gal to show you what things are used for. I don't know about your house but we had quizes and tests about equipment use and placement on the trucks. They'd tell us either what they wanted, we'd tell them where it was, they'd tell us to go get it. Or they'd tell us to go get something, then ask what we would use it for, then demonstrate how to use it. I'm sure someone would test you on stuff once you get comfortable. If you don't know, don't sit in the back and try to get passed up. Even if its embarassing, step up and go for it. If you don't know what it is, it's a heck of a lot better to not know while sitting in the house going over stuff rather than on a fire ground working a fire and not knowing. Best of luck.

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    If you are lucky enough to have an Essentials of Firefighting 5th ed. with a CD, the CD has a tool section, although it isnt very extensive.

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