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  1. #1
    4x4
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    Default Can anyone help?

    Hey fellas i was wondering if you guys could help me find an old post. It was kind of like a diary of a rookie South carolina firefighter maybe? I thought it was great and wanted to show it to some of the newer guys that will come through my station. I tried the search option but didnt have any luck


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    Permanently Removed CALFFBOU's Avatar
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    Keep searching.

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    Forum Member snowball's Avatar
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    Fireman4949 put this out a while back. I don't know if it's what you're looking for.
    Here's a few tips...

    Arrive at least 15 minutes early for duty...Every shift.

    Do the grunt work like cleaning, checking in the trucks, etc., without having to be told.

    Never complain about anything! Ever! There is nothing worse than a bitchin' probie (or firefighter, for that matter).

    Align yourself with those in the department that are motivated, knowledgeable and hard working. Those traits are contagious.
    Stay away from the slackers, whiners and complainers. Those traits are also contagious.

    Ask questions! You're not expected to know everything your first day, or your first month, but you should be learning all the time. If you don't know or understand something, ask the hows, wheres and whens BEFORE the bell rings.

    Always treat those you respond to with courtesy, respect and professionalism, just the same as you would treat a member of your own family. Don't ever loose compassion for those in need.

    Find one or two areas that you are most interested in (Haz-Mat, TRT, USAR, etc.) and learn all you can about them. No firefighter can do it all, nor should they, but every firefighter should have a few areas of expertise.

    Learn all of your departments policies and procedures and SOP's.

    Always be professional, both on and off duty. Present yourself to the public, and to your fellow firefighters as someone who is proud to be in the position. You represent your department, your brothers and the fire service 24/7/365, not just when your at the station.

    Respect the rich traditions of the fire service, while at the same time striving to make it even better for your having been a part of it. Respect those in authority over you as well. Hopefully you will one day be in their shoes and will have also earned the respect of all those around you.

    Stay out of trouble and stay clean. Nothing will ruin your reputation and your career faster than problems with the law.

    Always keep a good sense of humor, and don't take ribbing and practical jokes played on you, personally. It's all part of your initiation into the fire service. How you handle it speaks volumes about your character.

    If you have previous fire experience, for the most part, keep it to yourself. No one cares how you used to do it, only how you do it now.

    Never kiss *** to get ahead. Brown-nosers are hated by all in the fire service. The way to get ahead is by impressing people with your intelligence, your good moral character and your good work ethic.

    This is a tough job, and there will be many times when you'll be required to bust your butt to get the job done. Show everyone what your made of by going that extra yard, even when you don't think you can.

    Most importantly of all, have fun! This is, after all, the best damn job in the world!




    Kevin
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    IAFF Local 2339
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    "LEATHER FOREVER"
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    http://www.tfdfire.com/
    "Fir na tine"
    IAFF

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    4x4
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    Thanks for that. But what im trying to find is a post almost like his diary. He would arrive raise the flag, throw ladders etc etc. I have been trying to find it and cant locate it.

  5. #5
    Forum Member snowball's Avatar
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    I'll keep looking. Got any more info?
    IAFF

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    Default Found it

    The following was written by an anonymous rookie firefighter who recently completed a fire academy at a large, extremely traditional fire department in Southern California.

    My typical day as a rookie firefighter starts off at 4:30 a.m., waking before the sun comes up. I rehearse my drill for the day prior to leaving for work.

    5:10 a.m. I arrive at the station and open the gate.

    5:15 a.m. I enter the station and put up the first pot of coffee. I proceed to the bathroom and change into my fire department uniform. I return to the kitchen and make the second pot of coffee. I continue to the apparatus floor to get my turnouts in order on the engine or truck. I progress to the captain’s office where I check the journal to see yesterday’s activities as well as check the roster to see who I will be working with for the day. Lastly, I check the “new material” for any pertinent information pertaining to the department or today’s activities.

    5:35 a.m. I put up the American flag and gather the newspaper and return to the kitchen and spread it out, section by section, on the table. I then empty the dishwasher.

    6:15 a.m. My crewmembers begin to arrive as the off-going crew begins to wake up. I make it a point to say “good morning” to each and every member. If I haven’t met someone, I make it a point to introduce myself and not wait to be asked who I am.

    6:25 a.m. I find the other rookie so we can practice throwing every single ladder as well as practice donning our self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) for time. Periodically, between ladders and SCBA practice, I will return to the kitchen to make more coffee.

    7:15 a.m. I practice my daily drill with one of the senior firefighters. He or she will help me make sure my drill is prepared and ready for the rest of the crew.

    7:45 a.m. I proceed to the kitchen to prepare for the shift’s official line-up and make more coffee. I also clean up the mess made by the senior firefighters while making breakfast.

    8:00 a.m. I line up in the kitchen with all of the members of my shift. We go over the itinerary for the day and discuss any new material and departmental happenings.

    8:30 a.m. I begin the housework details. I always make it a point to be the first one cleaning the bathrooms with my scrubber and bleach/Comet mixture. I have learned that instead of flushing the toilet once clean, leave the soapy water in the bowl. This shows your crewmembers that the toilet has been cleaned.

    9:30 a.m. My crewmembers begin their physical fitness routine. The other rookie and I are busy throwing ladders, doing our daily/weekly maintenance checks and practicing our daily drill.

    10:30 a.m. We are en route to the store to shop for lunch and dinner. While at the market I will throw ladders, give on-the-spot drills on equipment, walking on roofs or doing something practical.

    11:30 a.m. I help the cook and set the table for lunch.

    12:00 p.m. Lunchtime! I am always the last to gather my plate unless otherwise ordered. I usually take the smallest portion to make sure there is enough for everyone. Even though I am usually the last to sit down, I am always the first one to get up and get into the dishes. I eat so quickly that most of the time I don’t even taste the food. I jump into the dishes until the cook calls for a “game” to decide who will officially be stuck in the dishes. This usually entails some type of dice or card game. I intentionally lose because it would not be correct to have the rookie at the table while the captain is in the suds.

    1 p.m. I will help the engineer or other senior firefighter with projects that need to be completed around the station or apparatus.

    2 p.m. I will give my drill in front of the 12 members of my crew. I have presented it at least three times before, but now the pressure is on. As you can imagine, each one of the firefighters has a tremendous amount of knowledge about the subject that I could never have learned in a book. It can be a bloodbath if I am not prepared. I find that if I take the time to do my research, I usually can come out of it alive. If not, it can be very difficult.

    3 p.m. I pull out the tool that I have been assigned for my drill on the following shift, and begin reacquainting myself with it. I research the tool in the technical journals and begin to gather my notes. When I get home, I will research on the internet for more information.

    4:30 p.m. I clean the kitchen from the afternoon’s snacking. I help the cook prepare for the dinner meal.

    5:30 p.m. I take down the flag and double check that the gate for the parking lot is locked to maintain security for the firefighters’ private vehicles.

    6 p.m. Same routine as lunch. I am the last to sit down and the first to be in the suds.

    7 p.m. I help the engineers wash and chamois down the apparatus.

    8 p.m. I will pull out another tool and begin to learn it. I will pull a ladder off the engine or truck and throw it, read the policies and procedures, or prepare for my drill next shift.

    10 p.m. I do a final cleanup around the station, picking up any residual trash, doing the dishes again, and doing a final inventory of the engine or truck.

    1:30a.m. I finally go to sleep when the last member of my crew has gone to bed.

    5:30 a.m. I wake up before the rest of my crew, put on my uniform and make coffee. I open the gate, get the newspaper and make sure the kitchen is clean.

    8:00 a.m. I change out of my uniform and leave the station after the last member of my crew leaves.

    This is just a rough baseline of what to expect as a rookie firefighter. It is important to note that this does not include running emergency responses and all of the on-the-spot questions that barrage you during the course of the day.

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    Originally posted by Battalion Chief Paul Lepore

  8. #8
    4x4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bull32 View Post
    The following was written by an anonymous rookie firefighter who recently completed a fire academy at a large, extremely traditional fire department in Southern California.

    My typical day as a rookie firefighter starts off at 4:30 a.m., waking before the sun comes up. I rehearse my drill for the day prior to leaving for work.

    5:10 a.m. I arrive at the station and open the gate.

    5:15 a.m. I enter the station and put up the first pot of coffee. I proceed to the bathroom and change into my fire department uniform. I return to the kitchen and make the second pot of coffee. I continue to the apparatus floor to get my turnouts in order on the engine or truck. I progress to the captain’s office where I check the journal to see yesterday’s activities as well as check the roster to see who I will be working with for the day. Lastly, I check the “new material” for any pertinent information pertaining to the department or today’s activities.

    5:35 a.m. I put up the American flag and gather the newspaper and return to the kitchen and spread it out, section by section, on the table. I then empty the dishwasher.

    6:15 a.m. My crewmembers begin to arrive as the off-going crew begins to wake up. I make it a point to say “good morning” to each and every member. If I haven’t met someone, I make it a point to introduce myself and not wait to be asked who I am.

    6:25 a.m. I find the other rookie so we can practice throwing every single ladder as well as practice donning our self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) for time. Periodically, between ladders and SCBA practice, I will return to the kitchen to make more coffee.

    7:15 a.m. I practice my daily drill with one of the senior firefighters. He or she will help me make sure my drill is prepared and ready for the rest of the crew.

    7:45 a.m. I proceed to the kitchen to prepare for the shift’s official line-up and make more coffee. I also clean up the mess made by the senior firefighters while making breakfast.

    8:00 a.m. I line up in the kitchen with all of the members of my shift. We go over the itinerary for the day and discuss any new material and departmental happenings.

    8:30 a.m. I begin the housework details. I always make it a point to be the first one cleaning the bathrooms with my scrubber and bleach/Comet mixture. I have learned that instead of flushing the toilet once clean, leave the soapy water in the bowl. This shows your crewmembers that the toilet has been cleaned.

    9:30 a.m. My crewmembers begin their physical fitness routine. The other rookie and I are busy throwing ladders, doing our daily/weekly maintenance checks and practicing our daily drill.

    10:30 a.m. We are en route to the store to shop for lunch and dinner. While at the market I will throw ladders, give on-the-spot drills on equipment, walking on roofs or doing something practical.

    11:30 a.m. I help the cook and set the table for lunch.

    12:00 p.m. Lunchtime! I am always the last to gather my plate unless otherwise ordered. I usually take the smallest portion to make sure there is enough for everyone. Even though I am usually the last to sit down, I am always the first one to get up and get into the dishes. I eat so quickly that most of the time I don’t even taste the food. I jump into the dishes until the cook calls for a “game” to decide who will officially be stuck in the dishes. This usually entails some type of dice or card game. I intentionally lose because it would not be correct to have the rookie at the table while the captain is in the suds.

    1 p.m. I will help the engineer or other senior firefighter with projects that need to be completed around the station or apparatus.

    2 p.m. I will give my drill in front of the 12 members of my crew. I have presented it at least three times before, but now the pressure is on. As you can imagine, each one of the firefighters has a tremendous amount of knowledge about the subject that I could never have learned in a book. It can be a bloodbath if I am not prepared. I find that if I take the time to do my research, I usually can come out of it alive. If not, it can be very difficult.

    3 p.m. I pull out the tool that I have been assigned for my drill on the following shift, and begin reacquainting myself with it. I research the tool in the technical journals and begin to gather my notes. When I get home, I will research on the internet for more information.

    4:30 p.m. I clean the kitchen from the afternoon’s snacking. I help the cook prepare for the dinner meal.

    5:30 p.m. I take down the flag and double check that the gate for the parking lot is locked to maintain security for the firefighters’ private vehicles.

    6 p.m. Same routine as lunch. I am the last to sit down and the first to be in the suds.

    7 p.m. I help the engineers wash and chamois down the apparatus.

    8 p.m. I will pull out another tool and begin to learn it. I will pull a ladder off the engine or truck and throw it, read the policies and procedures, or prepare for my drill next shift.

    10 p.m. I do a final cleanup around the station, picking up any residual trash, doing the dishes again, and doing a final inventory of the engine or truck.

    1:30a.m. I finally go to sleep when the last member of my crew has gone to bed.

    5:30 a.m. I wake up before the rest of my crew, put on my uniform and make coffee. I open the gate, get the newspaper and make sure the kitchen is clean.

    8:00 a.m. I change out of my uniform and leave the station after the last member of my crew leaves.

    This is just a rough baseline of what to expect as a rookie firefighter. It is important to note that this does not include running emergency responses and all of the on-the-spot questions that barrage you during the course of the day.

    Thanks man!!! I really appreciate it!!

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    No problem. That post stuck out to me as well and I knew exactly what you were referencing.

  10. #10
    Permanently Removed CALFFBOU's Avatar
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    4x4- I have some other Rookie program papers to share as well if you want. Just PM me.

    Thanks.

  11. #11
    4x4
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    Quote Originally Posted by CALFFBOU View Post
    4x4- I have some other Rookie program papers to share as well if you want. Just PM me.

    Thanks.
    thanks PM sent!

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