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  1. #1
    Permanently Removed CALFFBOU's Avatar
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    Default Do you really think youre cut out to be a Firefighter?

    I posted this on another site and thought I would share it here as well. Please no personal attacks in the thread, but PM me instead if needed. Thanks, Bou


    There has been a lot of buzz and interest on the internet lately about becoming a Professional Firefighter. People are seeing TV shows lately like FIRST IN and THE ACADEMY and it truly is motiving. Coupled with a down turned economy, lay offs and people coming out of the military- some folks are considering pursuing the best job in the world.

    But let me ask you a few questions first-

    Are you a selfish person? If you even slightly think the answer might be "Yes", then this job is definitely not for you. You have to give a lot from the first day to the end of your career. You need to really care, not fake it or just get through it. You need to always give something back, be grateful and humble. You need to remember that you are here to serve, not be self serving.

    I am posting this now because some people currently on the job are calling in sick, faking injuries and doing whatever it takes to have time off during the holidays. Not only is this wrong, its taxing to the system, creates paperwork and is unethical.

    If you are not a constant team player and slipped through the cracks, it will be obvious. You cant hide it and we will figure you out and label you. The best time for this is when a brother needs some help moving and he was the one that stepped up last year to help you. Are you the one that always asks for a shift trade and never returns them? These selfish people are annoying as hell and do not belong in our service orientated profession.

    Does blood and guts make you uncomfortable? If Yes, then this is definitely not the job for you. Over 80% of our calls are medical related and there is no way around this. Me- I have seen some bad stuff and some images are still stuck in my head over 10 years later. I am not trying to scare you, there is just some stuff you don't forget. Its human nature.

    There is a good work schedule, pay and benefits! Yes, there are. But these are not the sole reasons to join the fire service. If so, you will be disappointed. Also, please see the "Selfish" portion above.

    Will I get a job quickly? Most likely not. It takes years of hard work, dedication, education, volunteering with the tolls taxing your personal life to get a badge. This is no free ride and badge. It is a lifestyle of applying, traveling, CPATs, interviewing and the disappointment when you just wasted all of that time to not get hired.

    I am not typing all of this to be a jerk or discourage you. Sometimes raw, upfront and candid talk is the best advice. If this kind of brutal honesty rubs you wrong, then this career would defiantly not be for you. If you have any questions or comments, please hit me up here or PM me.

    Thanks, Bou


  2. #2
    MembersZone Subscriber tajm611's Avatar
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    Good post.

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    Forum Member DeputyChiefGonzo's Avatar
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    Blood and guts don't bother me at all... but if someone pukes and I see it... it's "barfology" at its finest!
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
    Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

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    MembersZone Subscriber Dickey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptainGonzo View Post
    Blood and guts don't bother me at all... but if someone pukes and I see it... it's "barfology" at its finest!
    Ah....a sympathy puker!!!
    Jason Knecht
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  5. #5
    Forum Member DeputyChiefGonzo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dickey View Post
    Ah....a sympathy puker!!!
    Yup... I can hear someone barfing.. and I'm okay. I see it or smell it... I will be barfing right along with them.

    This happened before the days of AED's...

    One Thanksgiving Day. we were dispatched to a cardiac arrest.

    The patient had just finished eating Thanksgiving dinner and was watching a football game when it happened.

    They needed help in the ambulance ( the ambo was strictly BLS at the time), so I got detailed from the Engine to assist. I was doing compressions when "chunks" of thanksgiving dinner started coming from the patient. I turned my head to the right and filled the right side footwell with my own thanksgiving dinner... the patient was suctioned and CPR continued.

    ALS intercepted the bone box, zapped the patient with their defibrillator and brought him back! It was a happy ending for a change.
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
    Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

  6. #6
    Forum Member GTRider245's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptainGonzo View Post
    Yup... I can hear someone barfing.. and I'm okay. I see it or smell it... I will be barfing right along with them.

    This happened before the days of AED's...

    One Thanksgiving Day. we were dispatched to a cardiac arrest.

    The patient had just finished eating Thanksgiving dinner and was watching a football game when it happened.

    They needed help in the ambulance ( the ambo was strictly BLS at the time), so I got detailed from the Engine to assist. I was doing compressions when "chunks" of thanksgiving dinner started coming from the patient. I turned my head to the right and filled the right side footwell with my own thanksgiving dinner... the patient was suctioned and CPR continued.

    ALS intercepted the bone box, zapped the patient with their defibrillator and brought him back! It was a happy ending for a change.
    At least you made it to the foot well!
    Career Firefighter
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rescue101 View Post
    I don't mind fire rolling over my head. I just don't like it rolling UNDER my a**.

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    Ahhh yes, sympathy puking...that's me for sure.

    Ok quick story time

    Years ago I'm on my first code with 2 other members, now unfortunately we forgot the bag mask on the rig. I'm new (like 3 weeks new and my FD's only been doing medicals for about a month) so I'm just lending a helping hand as one does compressions and other other gives mouth to mouth (yeah there was a time when that was acceptable). Well as we all know when doing rescue breathing sometimes air can get down into the stomach and cause whatever's in there to come out. Well that's just what happened about a minute and a half into CPR...right into the breather's mouth. So now he pukes...I see that and I'm done barf city all over the rug and then here goes the guy working the chest compressions......blaaaagggghh hhh. All this while the patient's wife is watching from the doorway. Did I mention that on the very first compression the guys fake eye shot out and landed on the end table by the couch. Luckily another member arrived bag mask in hand justs as we all emptied out. CPR continued and our patient lived for another 5 or 6 years.

    Needess to say I haven't forgotten the bag mask in the 30 years since.

    True story the moral of which is ALWAYs take the equipment you're going to need with you.

    Cogs

    And yes I'm cut out to be a firefighter and proud to say that after my kids, my involvement with the fire service is the BEST thing I've ever done.
    Last edited by FFPCogs08; 12-24-2009 at 05:30 PM.

  8. #8
    Permanently Removed CALFFBOU's Avatar
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    LOL, Just like the other board-


  9. #9
    MembersZone Subscriber Dickey's Avatar
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    I hear ya guys....

    Here is a funny for ya.

    We get a call of a guy at the country club on hole #12 tip over. We go driving right on the fairway to the guy. Three of us were loaded into our rescue vehicle, an old ambulance, and off we went. He was pulseless and not breathing. The senior guy says for me to go confirm and start CPR, (yes, mouth to mouth was the standard but a new gizmo called a "Pocket Mask" was just coming out and we bought a couple of these new whizbangs and put them in the truck, just not sure where. As I was waiting for the new pocket mask, I gave two breaths. I could hear the rushing sound of the puke coming but couldn't move out of the way in time. A chunk flew into my mouth, causing me to vomit. This guy had power puked the entire pepperoni pizza he just pounded down before coming out to the course.

    My partner who finally found the pocket mask comes from around the truck and smelled our two piles and he immediately puked. The ambulance was just a minute later. One of the medics runs out of the ambulance and happened to slip in our combined piles and falls right into it. He immediately puked. So now, his golfing buddies saw this and finally decided they couldn't hold back the evil themselves and let loose their own piles.

    So, when it was all said and done, there were 6 piles left on hole #12. Bad day for golf.
    Jason Knecht
    Assistant Chief
    Altoona Fire Dept.
    Altoona, WI

    IACOJ - Director of Cheese and Whine
    http://www.cheddarvision.tv/
    EAT CHEESE OR DIE!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by FFPCogs08 View Post
    Did I mention that on the very first compression the guys fake eye shot out and landed on the end table by the couch.
    That's a new one on me...

  11. #11
    55 Years & Still Rolling hwoods's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Hey Bou................

    Back to the O.P. (We gotta go back, A discussion of Puking makes me want to Barf ) Your post is a VERY down to earth explanation of the Facts. If your points are enough to make one person look very hard at what they want to do, it was worth it. BTW, I've got a bit more time on than you, but I agree with your post 100%.............
    Never use Force! Get a Bigger Hammer.
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    Forum Member PaladinKnight's Avatar
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    Bou:

    Thanks for presenting the truth.

    I think it also serves as reminder to the rest of us as to why we wanted to this.

    Merry Christmas Sir.
    HAVE PLAN.............WILL TRAVEL

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    Bou -

    Very good post.

  14. #14
    Forum Member Tipys's Avatar
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    I have to say good post too.

    I am trying to become a firefighter myself right now. I feel I have what it takes.

    In my EMT-B class we did ride alongs with the Ambulance. I will say I was scared on my first ride because I went in just wanting to do firefighting not any of the medical but knew it was something I would have to do. I will say after my first ride I am hooked this is I job I know I am going to love. Even took every chance I could to ride along. Five 12hour ride alongs loving every minute of it. Was even sadden on my last ride because I know how long of a process this is going to be. I was sadden because I knew it was going to be awhile before I could help those who were at there worst and feel that love for what I was doing again.

  15. #15
    MembersZone Subscriber tajm611's Avatar
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    I'd like to add:


    If you think your learning days are over after the academy/probationary period, leave. If you like to make fun of the guys like myself who take it upon themselves to learn as much as they can, leave. If you think the ones eager to help, eager to volunteer, and eager to learn or suck ups, leave. If you think after the academy you can sit in the truck and play on facebook while 3 guys clean up, meet me in the back after our shift, then leave.

  16. #16
    Permanently Removed CALFFBOU's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tajm611 View Post
    I'd like to add:


    If you think your learning days are over after the academy/probationary period, leave. If you like to make fun of the guys like myself who take it upon themselves to learn as much as they can, leave. If you think the ones eager to help, eager to volunteer, and eager to learn or suck ups, leave. If you think after the academy you can sit in the truck and play on facebook while 3 guys clean up, meet me in the back after our shift, then leave.
    Damn- Good stuff.

    Thanks to the others for the positive feedback. And Harve, ya, you got time on me. But I like it like that and you would be the person I would tie my wagon to in hopes of learning something. Like tajm611 said above- I got over 23 years and still a lot to learn.

    Bou

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    Forum Member DeputyChiefGonzo's Avatar
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    One thing that makes me cringe is when a firefighter with a lot of time on the job tells the rookie "I've forgotten more about this job than you'll ever know...."

    Every day should be a learning experience... and one has to retain that knowledge locked away somewhere in the confines of the lid, because one never knows when it will be needed.
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
    Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

  18. #18
    55 Years & Still Rolling hwoods's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Yep!!..........

    Quote Originally Posted by CaptainGonzo View Post
    One thing that makes me cringe is when a firefighter with a lot of time on the job tells the rookie "I've forgotten more about this job than you'll ever know...."

    Every day should be a learning experience... and one has to retain that knowledge locked away somewhere in the confines of the lid, because one never knows when it will be needed.

    EXACTLY!. "Knowing Everything" is totally useless unless you share that Knowledge. There have been times when I or another "Senior" member has shown a rookie a "Trick of the Trade" and then had that Rookie come back a month later and tell us that he used that info to solve a problem. It kinda makes your day....


    BTW, Chief - I do reserve the right to use "Look Son, I got more time in Third Alarm Coffeee Lines than you have in the Department" when it is appropriate....
    Never use Force! Get a Bigger Hammer.
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    Asst. Chief John R. Woods Sr. 1937 - 2006

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    Well as far as I'm concerned in my experiences the guys who act like or think they "know everything" in reality know nothing and are in fact a danger on the fireground. Usually they're probably nothing more than blabbering yard breathing lawn jockeys. They can recite this book or that chapter and verse trying to make themselves look good, yet they can't even make the front door because they're too busy over analyzing a room and contents job. Worst of all are the book worms that strut around spouting off about their vast "experience" but haven't seen a fire. They're the ones that lose it when a job hits and give the term clusterf*** it's meaning. And who can forget the know it alls that stand outside to get their picture in the paper so everyone can see what a "great" fireman they are.

    Around here we all know who the true veteran smoke eating Jakes are. They're the ones inside doing all the work making everyone else look good and never looking for the credit for doing it.


    Cogs
    Last edited by FFPCogs08; 12-25-2009 at 11:01 AM.

  20. #20
    Forum Member DeputyChiefGonzo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hwoods View Post
    EXACTLY!. "Knowing Everything" is totally useless unless you share that Knowledge. There have been times when I or another "Senior" member has shown a rookie a "Trick of the Trade" and then had that Rookie come back a month later and tell us that he used that info to solve a problem. It kinda makes your day....


    BTW, Chief - I do reserve the right to use "Look Son, I got more time in Third Alarm Coffeee Lines than you have in the Department" when it is appropriate....
    Harve...

    Bing-freaking-o!

    What's even better is when you show the probie something that you learned many many moons ago and they say.. "That's neat.... where did you learn that?"

    You just stand there smiling like the Cheshire Cat....
    Last edited by CaptainGonzo; 12-25-2009 at 11:11 AM.
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
    Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

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