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Thread: Self training

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    Forum Member FireEMT712's Avatar
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    Default Self training

    So I've been working on just getting from turnout gear to on air for awhile now just spending a couple hours free time here and there getting on air from ready position. I have recently been critisized by a fellow probie for spending a lot of time at the fire station (virtually no one on my department spends any time up there besides meetings and after calls). I guess what I'm asking is these 2 questions:
    A. Are there other things I can do myself at the station to increase efficiency.
    B. Is it not normal for a volunteer to spend much time at the firestation?
    Firefighter/EMT 712
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    Gifford Fire And Rescue
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    MembersZone Subscriber dmleblanc's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    As long as your leadership doesn't have a problem with it, keep on doing what you're doing. The best way to get familiar with your equipment is to constantly practice with it. And your PPE, SCBA in particular, is something you should be intimately familiar with. Keep practicing donning SCBA until it becomes as natural to you as putting on your jacket when you walk out the door of your house. Become familiar with every control, buckle and strap, until you can do it with your eyes closed. Your SCBA is your lifeline in a hazardous atmosphere, you cannot afford to be unfamiliar with how it operates.

    And while you're hanging out at the station, take the time to get familiar with the other equipment on the trucks, too.

    As far as your friend's opinion, as long as you're not requiring him to be there, it's really none of his concern. You'll be the one on the nozzle while he's still fumbling with his gear
    Chief Dwayne LeBlanc
    Paincourtville Volunteer Fire Department
    Paincourtville, LA

    "I have a dream. It's not a big dream, it's just a little dream. My dream — and I hope you don't find this too crazy — is that I would like the people of this community to feel that if, God forbid, there were a fire, calling the fire department would actually be a wise thing to do. You can't have people, if their houses are burning down, saying, 'Whatever you do, don't call the fire department!' That would be bad."
    — C.D. Bales, "Roxanne"

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    Forum Member PaladinKnight's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FireEMT712
    I have recently been critisized by a fellow probie for spending a lot of time at the fire station
    It never ceases to amaze me how someone is always worried about what others do.

    Tell this guy to mind his own business and he will be busy all the time.

    It is probably just a jealousy thing. He is worried you might find the cookies.
    HAVE PLAN.............WILL TRAVEL

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    Forum Member FireEMT712's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaladinKnight View Post
    It never ceases to amaze me how someone is always worried about what others do.

    Tell this guy to mind his own business and he will be busy all the time.

    It is probably just a jealousy thing. He is worried you might find the cookies.
    lol this is funny cause we did have some cookies from fire chiefs meeting left in fridge that I may or may not have finished off lol. Trying to get ready to pass my FFII test outs.(that's why i'm trying to self train)
    Firefighter/EMT 712
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    Gifford Fire And Rescue
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    Quote Originally Posted by FireEMT712 View Post
    So I've been working on just getting from turnout gear to on air for awhile now just spending a couple hours free time here and there getting on air from ready position. I have recently been critisized by a fellow probie for spending a lot of time at the fire station (virtually no one on my department spends any time up there besides meetings and after calls).
    Well when you are the first one packed up and go interior and he is stuck at the door humping hose cause he couldn't get his pack on fast enough i think he will stop criticizing you.

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    Forum Member CGITCH's Avatar
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    Nothing wrong with what you are doing. Makes it all that much easier when a call comes if you are comfortable in what you are wearing, and knowing where everything is. Eventually you will get to the point where all the basic stuff is second nature and you can really focus on the task at hand.

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    Forum Member FireEMT712's Avatar
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    Hey while i have you guys' attention, is 50 seconds good time for getting from entrance of fire station, into turnout gear, on truck, packed a ready to go on air, and off the truck?
    Firefighter/EMT 712
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    Quote Originally Posted by FireEMT712 View Post
    Hey while i have you guys' attention, is 50 seconds good time for getting from entrance of fire station, into turnout gear, on truck, packed a ready to go on air, and off the truck?
    Sounds like a good time.

    Yea get your pack on in the engine if your departments allows, but don't mask up until you are about to enter a IDLH (Immediate Danger to Life or health) atmosphere. For example the front door of a single story house.

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    MembersZone Subscriber dmleblanc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FireEMT712 View Post
    Hey while i have you guys' attention, is 50 seconds good time for getting from entrance of fire station, into turnout gear, on truck, packed a ready to go on air, and off the truck?
    Sounds a little too fast to me. Like maybe you're running. You go too fast, you'll miss something, and it may be the little something that'll get you burned (like maybe leaving skin exposed or something).

    Remember, NFPA standards recommend 1 minute to don turnout gear and 1 minute to don SCBA. That's 2 minutes, anything under that I would consider acceptable from street clothes to on-air. Anything in the 1-2 minute range is fine.

    Like an instructor once told me, slow is smooth and smooth is fast. Just get the motions down, develop muscle memory for the task, get your routine perfected and the speed part will come naturally.

    I know this sounds counter-intuitive, but one thing I'm always having to preach to my rookies is SLOW DOWN. They get that adrenaline rush and all of a sudden it's run, run, run, flinging equipment all over the place and tripping all over themselves trying to get on the truck. They have the speed but don't have the CONTROL. Master the basics and work on control.
    Chief Dwayne LeBlanc
    Paincourtville Volunteer Fire Department
    Paincourtville, LA

    "I have a dream. It's not a big dream, it's just a little dream. My dream — and I hope you don't find this too crazy — is that I would like the people of this community to feel that if, God forbid, there were a fire, calling the fire department would actually be a wise thing to do. You can't have people, if their houses are burning down, saying, 'Whatever you do, don't call the fire department!' That would be bad."
    — C.D. Bales, "Roxanne"

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    Forum Member FireEMT712's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmleblanc View Post
    Sounds a little too fast to me. Like maybe you're running. You go too fast, you'll miss something, and it may be the little something that'll get you burned (like maybe leaving skin exposed or something).

    Remember, NFPA standards recommend 1 minute to don turnout gear and 1 minute to don SCBA. That's 2 minutes, anything under that I would consider acceptable from street clothes to on-air. Anything in the 1-2 minute range is fine.

    Like an instructor once told me, slow is smooth and smooth is fast. Just get the motions down, develop muscle memory for the task, get your routine perfected and the speed part will come naturally.

    I know this sounds counter-intuitive, but one thing I'm always having to preach to my rookies is SLOW DOWN. They get that adrenaline rush and all of a sudden it's run, run, run, flinging equipment all over the place and tripping all over themselves trying to get on the truck. They have the speed but don't have the CONTROL. Master the basics and work on control.
    Got ya, makes perfect sense to me! Doing something right at normal speed or 10x more productive then doin it wrong twice as fast.
    Firefighter/EMT 712
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    Gifford Fire And Rescue
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    Forum Member TNFF319's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FireEMT712 View Post
    . Trying to get ready to pass my FFII test outs.(that's why i'm trying to self train)
    Please don't stop training once you get FFII. So many people think they now know everthing and no longer need to train. Just like EMS, you never know it all. If you do know it all retire before you get someone hurt.
    FF/Paramedic

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    Forum Member FireEMT712's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TNFF319 View Post
    Please don't stop training once you get FFII. So many people think they now know everthing and no longer need to train. Just like EMS, you never know it all. If you do know it all retire before you get someone hurt.
    Oh I won't I plan on getting my instructor II(eventually)
    Firefighter/EMT 712
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    Forum Member CGITCH's Avatar
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    As far as 50 seconds time that sounds pretty fast to be doing everything right. Look at it this way, you get on the truck in 45 seconds, next guy shows up 15 seconds later. You arrive on scene grab a hoseline and head for the front door. You and your partner(s) mask up and get ready to go interior. You enter the house, and find the fireroom(s). You find it is starting to rollover and know you only have a few seconds to act before the thing flashes. Your lower back starts to feel damn hot and gets worse once you open the nozzle. Well come to find out you went to fast and got your coat bunched up under your SCBA, and in your adrenaline rush and running you didn't notice it. Now you have to deal with at least 2nd degree burns on your back.

    Now what if you would have used that extra 15 seconds and arrived at the same time as the next guy? Probably wouldn't be in pain. The fastest you need to be is just a tad faster than the next guy so you aren't the one they are waiting on. No more faster than that. Who cares if you make the truck 30 seconds or a minute before anyone else. You aren't going anywhere.

    (I realize I probably exaggerated some stuff a little bit, but its what I used to get my point across. Not in the thinking mood to think of a more credible situation)

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    Listen,
    I tell every newbie or oldie, get up to the station and treat everything like they owned it. Make water, drive the truck, dress out. Not only do you know where everything is and are familiar with it, you often discover something that requires it to be taken care of. Especially before you need it in an emergency. I don't know how many times this policy has proven itself over and over. Those who worry about you being up there are often the one who have a tendancy to, well lets just say they are often the ones delaying capabilities.

    Oh! and I forgot to say, what do you think the public prefers seeing? A locked station with no activity or seeing cars and firefighters up at the station frequently?
    Last edited by jam24u; 02-01-2010 at 09:51 PM.

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    Forum Member FireEMT712's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jam24u View Post
    Listen,
    I tell every newbie or oldie, get up to the station and treat everything like they owned it. Make water, drive the truck, dress out. Not only do you know where everything is and are familiar with it, you often discover something that requires it to be taken care of. Especially before you need it in an emergency. I don't know how many times this policy has proven itself over and over. Those who worry about you being up there are often the one who have a tendancy to, well lets just say they are often the ones delaying capabilities.

    Oh! and I forgot to say, what do you think the public prefers seeing? A locked station with no activity or seeing cars and firefighters up at the station frequently?
    I'm going to have to go with seeing people up there!
    Firefighter/EMT 712
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    If you'll forgive a career guy intruding...

    The fastest you ever need to be dressed is faster than the driver is to be ready to pull out. I was only timed while I was in the academy. As long as you're not slowing the unit response, you're fast enough. Like CGITCH said, too fast can be dangerous.
    Opinions expressed are mine alone, and do not necessarily reflect those of the Philadelphia Fire Department and/or IAFF Local 22.

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    Forum Member PaladinKnight's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrpita View Post
    If you'll forgive a career guy intruding...

    The fastest you ever need to be dressed is faster than the driver is to be ready to pull out. I was only timed while I was in the academy. As long as you're not slowing the unit response, you're fast enough. Like CGITCH said, too fast can be dangerous.
    In other words...

    The crew that bunks and saddles-up together fights together.
    HAVE PLAN.............WILL TRAVEL

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrpita View Post
    If you'll forgive a career guy intruding...

    The fastest you ever need to be dressed is faster than the driver is to be ready to pull out. I was only timed while I was in the academy. As long as you're not slowing the unit response, you're fast enough. Like CGITCH said, too fast can be dangerous.
    I think mrpita has said it all. As for having the SCBA donned in a min. just try doing it in a moving engine with 3 other guys trying to do the same thing. Besides don't foget the F-ing seat belt that has to be delt with now.
    Stephen J Bourassa
    Latham FD (NY)
    member since 1969
    challenge competitor since 1993

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    Forum Member CGITCH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaladinKnight View Post
    In other words...

    The crew that bunks and saddles-up together fights together.
    Why didn't I think of that...saved my *** a lot of typing

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    Forum Member PaladinKnight's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CGITCH View Post
    Why didn't I think of that...saved my *** a lot of typing
    I was just summarizing what you had stated so eloquently....

    ...the period at the end of the sentence.

    Carry on Sir. You're doing well.


    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Just a little tip... the driver isn't going to leave the officer behind...

    So be sure to 'gear up' next to the officer. If he is out pacing you... tell him his shoelace is untied.

    He will either laugh 'h-a-o' after he looks down or you'll be walking to the fire...


    Some officers do not have any sense of humor what so ever.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Another tip... if you ever make driver, do not leave the officer behind.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    I had that happen. The driver was in such a big hurry, he jumped in with one leg in his pants, one arm in the coat, and drove out of the bay, leaving me and three other guys behind. He arrived alone. He walked back.
    HAVE PLAN.............WILL TRAVEL

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