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  1. #21
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    I usually do not care a tool when on the nozzle. (Although sometimes their might be a tool on the line right behind me)
    If i am riding the hydrant position it depends on how well the stretch is progressing. If the line is in-service and hitting the fire i will grab a closet hook. If the streatch is difficult or slowed I will not grab a tool and focus on the streatch. If we are streatching a 2.5 then all hands are needed to advace. regardless my main priortiy is the hose streatch. kinks are chased and doors are choked.
    The officer will usually have a light and radio and a small officers tool. they do not need to be distracted by opening up or other task. they are responsible fo monitoring the hose streatch and conditions in the fire area.

    The truck will then come in and open up. that is what they are there for.


  2. #22
    Forum Member DubyaVFF's Avatar
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    We go inside on attack with at least two tools. One tool has a hoseline, and one tool has a halligan and an axe
    "I've met lots of volunteer firefighters, but I've never seen a volunteer fire!"
    - R. MacLeod, Alma VFD

  3. #23
    MembersZone Subscriber ffmedcbk1's Avatar
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    all have full ppe, radios, lights

    nozzle nothing showing = can or abc if called as a possible "electrical" fire
    nozzleman working fire = nozzle and 50 feet of hose or 1st hose pack

    Back-up = irons or irons or irons and 2nd hose pack (oic fills if on a 4 man company)

    Hydrant man = hook and tic when done at hydrant , may be ovm if a simple stretch

    OIC = hook (usually left at attack entry point)
    Originally Posted by madden01
    "and everyone is encouraged to use Plain, Spelled Out English. I thought this was covered in NIMS training."

  4. #24
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    At my department, the nozzleman carries nothing, 2nd man carries pickhead, haligan or both and the officer carries at least a TIC. We have a limited number of radios but each team has at least 1, but usually 2 radios with them at all times.

    2nd in crew follows in similar fashion, exception is the officer usually is carrying a pike pole instead of a TIC.

  5. #25
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    Engine men stretch lines, and put water on the fire. Truck men carry tools and force entry, vent, and search.

    Should my engine arrive well before a truck one of us will grab a halligan and maul so we can force entry.

    If I get stuck on the hydrant side at a one room fire where the fire should be knocked down quickly I'll grab a rake off the truck so I can do a little work.

  6. #26
    Forum Member FiremanLyman's Avatar
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    Everyone carries a tool. Nozzleman, officer, backup, door control... I stick a maul in my SCBA belt when I am on the nozzle. Yes, the nozzel is my primary tool on fire attack, but I want a tool to punch through a wall if a situation goes to hell in a hand basket.

    On my normal crew the second firefighter carries a 4' hook, our officer grabs a halligan. My suggestion if you are traveling to another station is to talk about what tools you usually carry, know what the other guys are bringing to the fight.

    Someone said one halligan and the rest carry a pickhead axe. My question is; what are you using as a striking tool with the halligan? Or are you baseball swinging the halligan all the time?

    In addition, someone (usually the officer if he isn't running command) on the team will have the TIC. It amazes me how often you see a team advancing without a TIC. I was not a big fan of the TIC when it first became popular, but I have drank from the kool-aide and have seen the light.

  7. #27
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    Default 2nd in

    alright so we all are pretty good with tool selection when first in engine. What about times when the truck has an extended eta? or your the 3, 4, 5, 6th engine in? what tools do you grab then???

    and someone please explain why every member has a pix-head tucked in their belt?

  8. #28
    Forum Member len1582's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cwat2026 View Post
    ....and someone please explain why every member has a pix-head tucked in their belt?
    Maybe because it's a versatile tool. You can chop with one side and pry or rip with the other. Also hook something and pull/drag or flip it.

  9. #29
    Forum Member GTRider245's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cwat2026 View Post
    and someone please explain why every member has a pix-head tucked in their belt?
    The way that department is set up the axe is part of thier emergency bailout kit.
    Career Firefighter
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rescue101 View Post
    I don't mind fire rolling over my head. I just don't like it rolling UNDER my a**.

  10. #30
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    thanks, just wondering cause there are different tools, like the flat head, maul, hook and halligan, all different. Mt company has each member with a different tool so your crew can face any job that confronts you. but i believe LA all carry pick heads...


    soo what about when your the 4, 5, 6th company in,, past your sops... then what tools are you bringing to the show?

  11. #31
    Forum Member BKDRAFT's Avatar
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    Why would you go anywhere without your axe!? Always have it on you.

  12. #32
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    As far as what to carry when you are later in, that would depend on what work you have to do and the building it is being done in. The IC should assign a tactic (overhaul) then the company officer should size up what that should entail (hooks) and everyone should get to work.

  13. #33
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    Default ????????????

    How do you check the floor if you don't have a tool?

    Basement floors are hard, and probably damn hot.

  14. #34
    Forum Member FyredUp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cwat2026 View Post

    and someone please explain why every member has a pix-head tucked in their belt?
    That was my post saying everyone on a fire alarm or working fire carries a pick head axe. We are trained to use the pick head axe as an anchor point for our self rescue bail out kits. We drive the handle into a hole in the wall and secure our bail out line to the handle. We are also trained in breaching walls and other structural elements for self rescue. To me putting the axe in my gut belt is an natural as putting on the rest of my PPE.

    I am assigned to a quint. If we are running as an engine and my job is to advance the attack line the only tool I carry is my pick head axe. If we are doing an alarm investigation I will add a 6 foot FDNY style hook and a 2 1/2 gallon water extinguisher to the tools I carry. If we run as the truck I have a variety of tools to pick from depending on the task, different hooks, the irons, and either a roof vent chain saw or a K-12.
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
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  15. #35
    Forum Member Tony4310's Avatar
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    Lots of outstanding info here. Nice to see what everyone uses depending on the job at hand!

  16. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by FiremanLyman View Post
    Everyone carries a tool. Nozzleman, officer, backup, door control... I stick a maul in my SCBA belt when I am on the nozzle. Yes, the nozzel is my primary tool on fire attack, but I want a tool to punch through a wall if a situation goes to hell in a hand basket.

    On my normal crew the second firefighter carries a 4' hook, our officer grabs a halligan. My suggestion if you are traveling to another station is to talk about what tools you usually carry, know what the other guys are bringing to the fight.

    Someone said one halligan and the rest carry a pickhead axe. My question is; what are you using as a striking tool with the halligan? Or are you baseball swinging the halligan all the time?

    In addition, someone (usually the officer if he isn't running command) on the team will have the TIC. It amazes me how often you see a team advancing without a TIC. I was not a big fan of the TIC when it first became popular, but I have drank from the kool-aide and have seen the light.

    Probably the best thing said thus far. Everyone posting should read this posting above. Whether it is an alarm or you have a worker, everyone should be ready for the real deal. everyone needs a hand tool to work with to A get to the fire and B when something goes wrong. When you get into the mind set of the truck will bring the tools, thats when you get stuck in the situations when you wish your thought process was different. Yes the line is your job, yes it puts out the fire, but what happens when you need to force an interior door or take a window from the inside or when the fire decides to get its way around you due to structure layout. Go on FFClosecalls and check some of the stories out when the nozzle team gets themselves into trouble and picture yourself in that mess with no tools. I like alot of the posts but some of them just don't make sense to me.

    The way our dept runs is nozzle has the nob and tool of choice, back up has irons, ov has ladders hook and halligan (outside), control has a hook, and officer has a halligan and the TIC. Everyone is equip with a flashlight and a radio also. Everyones tool is mounted in the rig right next to them so they dont have an excuse for being to rushed to grab it. Yes we do have 2 engines, a tower, and a heavy rescue coming from our dept and yes I expect the tool boxes to get inside with some equipment to help out but with a first due engine always be prepared.

  17. #37
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    Thought I'd add this little side note quickly. I learned several years back how to adapt and overcome if for some reason you should become separted from your tool in a structure with lightweight construction walls covered with drywall. You can use your SCBA. First, find the void between two studs and center your body between them, then turn around with your back against the wall and get in a sitting position with your bottle resting on the wall. Lean forward and come back as hard as you can, eventually you'll bust completely through. Keep in mind, this is only recommended if A), you've lost your tool, B) there is either no window/door access in the room you are in, and C) the window is too far off the ground and you don't have a last resort life safety rope. Like I said, this is a last ditch effort after you've tried everything else and you don't have your tool for some reason. And yes, use your radio and keep your command advised of what you're doing, if you can.

  18. #38
    Forum Member FyredUp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by firefightinirish217 View Post
    Thought I'd add this little side note quickly. I learned several years back how to adapt and overcome if for some reason you should become separted from your tool in a structure with lightweight construction walls covered with drywall. You can use your SCBA. First, find the void between two studs and center your body between them, then turn around with your back against the wall and get in a sitting position with your bottle resting on the wall. Lean forward and come back as hard as you can, eventually you'll bust completely through. Keep in mind, this is only recommended if A), you've lost your tool, B) there is either no window/door access in the room you are in, and C) the window is too far off the ground and you don't have a last resort life safety rope. Like I said, this is a last ditch effort after you've tried everything else and you don't have your tool for some reason. And yes, use your radio and keep your command advised of what you're doing, if you can.
    There is absolutely no way for me to ask you this question with out sounding like a smart ***, so let me apologize up front.

    Why wouldn't you sit on your butt facing the wall and just use your boots to bust through the dry wall? I mean we are talking about drywall here. It has virtually no resistance to that kind of attack. Frankly, I find the method you describe as potentially painful, time consuming, and possibly damaging to the SCBA high pressure line.

    But then again, if it owrks for you...more power to you Brother.

    By the way if I lost my primary tool, my axe, I carry a pair of those channel lock rescue pliars in my bunker pant's pocket and I believe they would do seriously damage to dry wall in quite a hurry if need be.
    Last edited by FyredUp; 06-11-2010 at 11:26 PM.
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
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  19. #39
    Forum Member L-Webb's Avatar
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    You never lose your front kick.
    Bring enough hose.

  20. #40
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    Talking

    Heck, if need be I know I can punch through drywall when the Flyers lose the Cup on a BS OT goal. If my life's on the line, and it's my last chance, I WILL get through.
    Opinions expressed are mine alone, and do not necessarily reflect those of the Philadelphia Fire Department and/or IAFF Local 22.

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