1. #1
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    Default Keeping pt's warm

    Does anybody use any type of portable heating units during extrication in cold weather-preferably electric? If you do could you let me know what type your dept uses...and yes, we do use blankets now.
    I have the same post in the extrication forum
    "If I'm not back in five minutes.. wait longer."

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    Blankets and if really needed heat packs.
    Then if we are in bad weather and have to wait for a bus we will slide them into a rescue with the heat on. Other than that we try to keep anything else out of the way.

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    i have heard of depts near me using both electric heaters and the small propane heaters to keep people warm during extended extrication's.

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    Quote Originally Posted by zackman1801 View Post
    i have heard of depts near me using both electric heaters and the small propane heaters to keep people warm during extended extrication's.
    A propane heater at the scene of an auto extrication? Please tell us that is a joke.

    A pressurized flammable cylinder and what is basically an open flame at an incident where fuel is most likely everywhere, including inside of your extrication tool generator, has to be one of the most absurd "tricks of the trade" I have ever heard of.

    The amount of BTU's given off by a propane heater to heat a car is the very definition of overkill.

    Might as well use a flamethrower. I doubt it would be any more hazardous than a propane heater.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jakesdad View Post
    A propane heater at the scene of an auto extrication? Please tell us that is a joke.

    A pressurized flammable cylinder and what is basically an open flame at an incident where fuel is most likely everywhere, including inside of your extrication tool generator, has to be one of the most absurd "tricks of the trade" I have ever heard of.

    The amount of BTU's given off by a propane heater to heat a car is the very definition of overkill.

    Might as well use a flamethrower. I doubt it would be any more hazardous than a propane heater.
    A pressurized flammable cylinder...somewhat like oxygen right?
    Sure there is a chance fuel might be spilled and you would need to take precautions.
    And last your not heating the car, if your preforming extrication the car is going to be in pieces meaning you would be heating the area around the car and the patients, it takes alot more heat to keep someone warm when they are no longer in an enclosed space. My dept does not use one of these, so if your looking to attack someone please feel free to head right on over and tell them just how you feel.

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    Quote Originally Posted by zackman1801 View Post
    A pressurized flammable cylinder...somewhat like oxygen right?
    Sure there is a chance fuel might be spilled and you would need to take precautions.
    And last your not heating the car, if your preforming extrication the car is going to be in pieces meaning you would be heating the area around the car and the patients, it takes alot more heat to keep someone warm when they are no longer in an enclosed space. My dept does not use one of these, so if your looking to attack someone please feel free to head right on over and tell them just how you feel.

    Pointing out the inherent drawbacks and legitimate safety concerns of a particular technique doesn't constitute an "attack".

    We can certainly disagree on this.

    But you seem awfully defensive of a patient warming technique you claim to not even perform.

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    Quote Originally Posted by zackman1801 View Post
    A pressurized flammable cylinder...somewhat like oxygen right?
    Oxygen is not flammable. It is an oxidizer that supports combustion.
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
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    Keep your Butts in Gear and get them Cut out, And you Won't have to worry about Heaters and such..
    Courage, Being Scared to Death and Saddling Up anyways.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jakesdad View Post
    Pointing out the inherent drawbacks and legitimate safety concerns of a particular technique doesn't constitute an "attack".

    We can certainly disagree on this.

    But you seem awfully defensive of a patient warming technique you claim to not even perform.
    Im not defending the technique rather myself. If you come to my dept you wont find any propane heaters on the trucks, we have electrical systems that would support electric heaters, although the lack of extrication tools kind of limits the actual amounts of extrication we do.

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    We have (very successfully) used a portable electric/propane powered heater for well over 10 years. It is the same kind used by utility companies to heat manholes- I believe it is manufactured by Pelsue? (spelling?) The fan is electric, and the heat is provided by propane. There is a collapsable slinky-type tube that we extend fully to about 40', keeping the hazards away from the extrication hot zone. We have been special called all over the place for it's use in confined space incidents, extrications, etc.

    We also fire it up in the winter for rehab zone purposes.

    EDIT: here is a link, this looks pretty similar to our unit.
    http://www.pelsue.com/products/heati...ting-1590.html
    Last edited by FWDbuff; 02-04-2010 at 11:03 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bushwhacker View Post
    Keep your Butts in Gear and get them Cut out, And you Won't have to worry about Heaters and such..
    You obviously don't respond to any limited access highways or are in a densely populated area where accidents are so severe that extrication times can be longer than 30 minutes......
    "Loyalty Above all Else. Except Honor."

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    if they are hot looking, offer to cuddle
    The Box. You opened it. We Came...

    "You'll take my life but I'll take your's too. You'll fire musket but I'll run you through. So when your waiting for the next attack, you'll better understand there's no turn back."

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    If it gets really cold down here, we'll stck a portable light inside the car and cover the car with a salvage cover.

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    Blankets and hustle.

    We have a good chunk of interstate and some nasty bad wrecks, and i've never needed a portable heater.

    I like the slinky tube idea, but don't think we'd use it too often.
    I am now a past chief and the views, opinions, and comments are mine and mine alone. I do not speak for any department or in any official capacity. Although, they would be smart to listen to me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FWDbuff View Post
    You obviously don't respond to any limited access highways or are in a densely populated area where accidents are so severe that extrication times can be longer than 30 minutes......
    Really? Assume the Call Comes in, In Under 20 mins. We are 20 Miles(translated into to VFD time 30-40 mins) away from a Rescue Truck, That is assuming its right in town. That of course is also assuming that it is a Car not a Semi, Tractor, Or Heavy Equipment. If it is even on one of the numerous single lane roads, not off the grade over a Break.

    Limited access and Prolonged are our extrication's.
    Courage, Being Scared to Death and Saddling Up anyways.

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    You all are thinking way too much here with heaters and propane and prolonged times etc.

    We expose our patients and then hit them with a fog mist. This creates shivering which we all know is the bodies natural way of building heat. If they don't build it fast enough that's ok as well, because as the core temp decreases the actual revivability time increases. You know, blood shunted to the vital organs? It's that whole "not dead til your warm and dead thing" priciple that we operate by.


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    Quote Originally Posted by YFDLt08 View Post
    You all are thinking way too much here .....
    We expose our patients and then hit them with a fog mist.

    13/4" or 21/2" ? I'm sure there are people here who think you should use a straight tip.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptainGonzo View Post
    Oxygen is not flammable. It is an oxidizer that supports combustion.

    thank you. I'm surprised how many firefighters don't know this little fact

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    Quote Originally Posted by JHR1985 View Post
    if they are hot looking, offer to cuddle
    Funny post....

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    Quote Originally Posted by len1582 View Post
    13/4" or 21/2" ? I'm sure there are people here who think you should use a straight tip.
    LMAO. Use a straight tip so you don't "push" the victim out, and always attack from the unwrecked side.

    I forgot to mention, though, that this technique only applies if the car is in the driveway. As we all know, if there's no car in the driveway...no one's inside.

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    Why not just use one of the 500w portable lights. The are already on the truck and then shelter the vehicle with a salvage cover like mentioned earlier.

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    Default pt warming

    It doesn't get too cold here in Cali but how about some warmed IV fluids and a blanket?

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