1. #1
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    5

    Default how to make map book

    i no this sounds like a dumb basic question but i was just wondering how one would go about making a map book. if there is a program that one uses or anything

  2. #2
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    SW MO
    Posts
    4,249

    Default

    Get with your 911 agency and ask if they've got one they use. If they don't, see if they won't develop one. If used to it's full capability and done right, your 911 can send a mapbook page number with your page-outs to help find an address easier. If they send cross-streets with the mapbook page, it's easier yet.

  3. #3
    Forum Member
    DeputyChiefGonzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Somewhere between genius and insanity!
    Posts
    13,586

    Default

    Contact your department of public works/highway department.

    If you live in the snowbelt area, they may already have map books drawn up for plowing routes.

    Why reinvent the wheel?
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
    Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

  4. #4
    Forum Member
    FireStick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    51

    Default

    If you absolutely have to draw one, try Google Sketchup. It's free.

  5. #5
    Forum Member
    FWDbuff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Pee-Ayy!
    Posts
    7,429

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fozz1988 View Post
    i no this sounds like a dumb basic question but i was just wondering how one would go about making a map book. if there is a program that one uses or anything
    What does "i no" mean?
    "Loyalty Above all Else. Except Honor."

  6. #6
    Forum Member
    PaladinKnight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    2,413

    Default

    Start with a map of your district. Perhaps you can get that from your county court house. You most likely will have to build it from scratch. Also check with your 911 Supervisor if one exists.

    I am not aware of any software program that 'automatically' builds map books. The closest thing that have used and seen is ArcGIS. it has been around for awhile and is user-friendly for the most part. The data still has to be plugged in. You will need somewhat advanced computer skills to design specific maps.

    We use GIS coupled with Google Earth and build overlays for different assets, like water supply, houses and addresses, ect. We can add or delete any overlay as needed for whatever purpose. We do not use map-books. We use laptops in our apparatus that use a digital link through our com center. All data is sent to the trucks and the officer can manipulate the data and overlays for his liking.

    Depending on your situation, it could take a very long time and alot of hard work to build the book. Of course you can pay someone do build it for you depending on your resources.
    HAVE PLAN.............WILL TRAVEL

  7. #7
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    639

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FWDbuff View Post
    What does "i no" mean?
    Another great, constructive contribution to the conversation. Thanks for the great input.

    I'd go to your village first, and if they don't have suitable maps go to the state. As was said earlier, they probably have maps for snowplow routes, that you could use as a starting point.

  8. #8
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Lusby, MD
    Posts
    1,035

    Default

    I'm in the process now of updating our maps. The old ones were hand drawn, so no computer files. The county had a GIS survey done and put on a web site, but the maps it prints are too small and don't cover convenient areas. I've been cutting and pasting to powerpoint and then tracing over an re-numbering in order to get street names and addresses legible.

    Probably not the easiest way, but it works with the tools I have available.
    Last edited by Eng34FF; 02-24-2010 at 08:23 PM.

  9. #9
    Some Guy

    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Location
    I don't know but I here laughing.
    Posts
    1,001

    Default

    We are using this: http://www.wthtechnology.com/Products/gis/think_gis.htm

    The Think GIS is pretty neat.
    This space for rent

  10. #10
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    virginia
    Posts
    537

    Default

    We have both the computer MDT based maps and Older hand sketched maps. I prefer the handmade maps. Easy to up date, never break, and you can custom make them. We have all kind of notes and such written on them. Our hydrant man just flips to the page andd gives the driver the directions.

    I would call the local government and see what they have, i am sure they have something. if they already have a map book then you can can make custom pages to fit your needs. For instance a page that has a blow up of a housing project or warehouse complex. Then hand mark the hydrants. Write little notes such as gates, street to narrow to fit truck, etc.

    Yes this is going to take alot of time. However deligate this to your men. What better is their to learn the district.

    If they do not have a map book. get a wall map and start drawing.

  11. #11
    Back In Black
    ChiefKN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    The Nice Part of New Jersey
    Posts
    6,981

    Default

    For confusing developments or large apartment complexes, this is what I did.

    Google maps, get the "aerial view".

    Then photoshop the building numbers and street names, hydrants etc. I even highlighted the roads to make it easier to pick them out.

    This is an example, which I laminated. I did almost all of this work right at my computer and then did a drive/walk around marking hydrants.

    We have a couple of these garden apartment complexes, and they are a maze.

    I have used these numerous times and they were KEY! These are full 8x12's. I had to shrink it to fit here.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by ChiefKN; 02-24-2010 at 09:44 PM.
    I am now a past chief and the views, opinions, and comments are mine and mine alone. I do not speak for any department or in any official capacity. Although, they would be smart to listen to me.

    "The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on the list."

    "When tempted to fight fire with fire, remember that the Fire Department usually uses water."

  12. #12
    Forum Member
    Chenzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Rural WI
    Posts
    1,253

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ChiefKN View Post
    For confusing developments or large apartment complexes, this is what I did.

    Google maps, get the "aerial view".

    Then photoshop the building numbers and street names, hydrants etc. I even highlighted the roads to make it easier to pick them out.

    This is an example, which I laminated. I did almost all of this work right at my computer and then did a drive/walk around marking hydrants.

    We have a couple of these garden apartment complexes, and they are a maze.

    I have used these numerous times and they were KEY! These are full 8x12's. I had to shrink it to fit here.
    That's a damn good idea. I just might have to use that same idea when I update our maps.

  13. #13
    Forum Member
    snowball's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Just North of South Central
    Posts
    2,740

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ATFDFF View Post
    Another great, constructive contribution to the conversation. Thanks for the great input.
    The guy is going to be making a map, you'd think that spelling would be an issue for street names.

    Google GIS programs. They are expensive but you can design your own layout if you have funky streets.
    IAFF

  14. #14
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    N. Ridgeville, Ohio
    Posts
    811

    Default

    Depending on the size of your community and the number of streets, this is what I did....

    I made a book with turn by turn directions to every street from the station. You look up the street name and it shows the directions. Address splits are important for lnger streets to get their the most efficient way as well. This is very easy to set up and update once you have all the information.
    Jason Brooks
    IAFF Local 2388
    IACOJ

  15. #15
    Back In Black
    ChiefKN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    The Nice Part of New Jersey
    Posts
    6,981

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jbrescue View Post
    Depending on the size of your community and the number of streets, this is what I did....

    I made a book with turn by turn directions to every street from the station. You look up the street name and it shows the directions. Address splits are important for lnger streets to get their the most efficient way as well. This is very easy to set up and update once you have all the information.
    This is how we did it for a long time. It worked great, unless you were coming from somewhere other then the station.
    I am now a past chief and the views, opinions, and comments are mine and mine alone. I do not speak for any department or in any official capacity. Although, they would be smart to listen to me.

    "The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on the list."

    "When tempted to fight fire with fire, remember that the Fire Department usually uses water."

  16. #16
    Forum Member
    mtg55's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,313

    Default

    We use a box card system in our local. Whatever box number is dispatched, you can go right to the page (or file, now that we have data terminals) for that specific box. We have ours professionally done, which is great if you have the money. The big things to think about regardless of how you design them are address, hydrant location, water supply locations (draft points), and a directional point of reference. Keep it as simple as possible for ease of use. I've seen some departments that you need a degree in topography just to respond into their local...

    http://www.newtownfire.com/map_pages.html
    Matt G.
    Battalion Chief
    IACOJ-Member
    FTM-PTB

  17. #17
    Forum Member
    Doorbreaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Near Cooperstown N.Y.
    Posts
    111

    Default

    We don't have a lot of roads in the district but they can be interesting. With almost 1/3 being seasonal it can be interesting if you don't know the proper roads. I have made up intersection books and single panel wall maps for each station. Used both google maps and MS Street and trips. Neat thing with MS is that you can load it into a laptop. Connect the GPS sensor and drive around the district. The GPS allows you to hit a couple keys and log in particular items onto the map. Water sources close to the roads, actual address information on seasonals, locations of bad radio or cell reception.

    Then my current plan is a larger wall map, with transparent overlays for the above.
    Plus smaller map books for the rigs.

    As for using the county system, well it would work, but half of the roads are missing and others have the wrong names.

    For those of you who use Google maps, take a CLOSE look at the names and roads they list. They will be VERY happy to change names and even add hidden roads if you notify them of the problem areas. I did that with a few of ours and am gradually woring on the outlying areas as well.

  18. #18
    Banned

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    8,677

    Default

    You can use Geographical Information Systems from MapInfo or ESRI to do this. However GIS systems are intended to do way more than just create maps. They are a way to analyze what is going on based on geographical information. Companies use this type of software to see where they are getting sales, it is used to track diseases and such. In the fire service it could be used to track where the most calls are and even track which areas have more intense calls. In the EMS services you could also track where the class are. This would allow you to better deploy your manpower and equipment

    There is also this package On-Scene Xplorer It does the mapping and pre-planning. You can also add hardened PCs to the trucks to carry all your stuff.

  19. #19
    Forum Member
    CaptOldTimer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 1999
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    7,273

    Default

    Why not learn your district? It worked years back and can still work.

    The Officer conducts a daily drill each morning asking the members a street location and how do we get there from here.

    I don't own a GPS thing. Our kids do and they can't go anywhere without putting in the address and listening to a voice tell them to turn here or turn there.

    Too mush BS!!
    Stay Safe and Well Out There....

    Always remembering 9-11-2001 and 343+ Brothers

  20. #20
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Outside Philadelphia
    Posts
    519

    Default

    Although a PITA, AutoCad works great. We've been using it for about 10 years now and thankfully have a few engineer's(not the driver type) in the Dept who are proficient with it.

    http://ugfd.org/custom.html?id=6767
    A Fire Chief has ONLY 1 JOB and that's to take care of his fireman. EVERYTHING else falls under this.

  21. #21
    MembersZone Subscriber
    tree68's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Jefferson County, NY USA
    Posts
    2,346

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CaptOldTimer View Post
    Why not learn your district? It worked years back and can still work.
    I put together a response last night, but the server was apparently on the fritz. So, here's what I can remember.

    Everyone should know their district, but sometimes you just need a little help, like if Highway 68 runs all the way through your district. That's when you start needing to know which way the numbers go, and if you've got a lot of roads, that could be trying.

    Assembling a map book is a good way to help you know that information, however. Including the house numbers on the map (along with other key information, like hydrants, etc) won't hurt. In addition to roads that run clear through a district, I've seen cases where roads are not continuous through their length, and if you don't know which block(s) you are going to it's not as easy as just driving further up the road. you may have to backtrack and approach from a completely different direction.

    Another source for maps is http://mapper.acme.com. Their "Hybrid" overlay of the satellite image includes house numbering.

    Build a good index, and include a grid (the same grid) on every map - that way if you specify that a certain road or location is on map 20, in grid F11, your folks will know where to look, including where on the page when they get there.

    Also mark your maps to show which page has the bordering maps. Saves having to go back to the index. If you're on Map 20 and the next map north is map 15, say so.

    Once you're done tweaking, laminate the maps and, of course, put a book in each rig, as well as at the firehouse.

    Check with your neighbors, too. See if they've done books for their districts, and be sure to give them copies of your finished product. If you can't afford to laminate them for them, don't sweat it.

    Scan the finished product into a PDF file - many scanners and copiers will do that for you. Then you'll have a pristine copy to use if you need another. You can also put it on a computer at the station and distribute it to your members and your neighbors that way.

    If you have someone who can write HTML well, you could always have them build an internal website on your station computer that hyperlinks to the appropriate map when you click on it in the index.

  22. #22
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    12

    Default our map books

    For our department we have 2 styles of map book. One is basically a list of streets. Under each street name is the cross street as if you were responding from the station as well as the closest hydrant or drafting source for example
    Hartswood Rd
    across from 676 High Ridge Rd
    -Closest Hydrants-
    ##High Ridge Rd
    ##Hartswood Rd
    intersection of Hartswood and Crystal Lake Rd


    this style of Road Book has been being used by us for years. That being said we have recently changed to a grid system and all of our rigs were supplied with a map book with one grid per page. One of our members took it upon himself to make normal size copies of just our district for each member to carry in their POV. This book does not include house numbers which i think would be useful so in my personal book i marked every T intersection with which numbers are in which direction.

  23. #23
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    378

    Default Map Book

    If you cover a rural area, the Post Office may be able to help provide information. The rural carriers and city carriers deliver 6 days a week to your community and can fill in some vital information.

    They may not be able to provide names of residents for privacy reasons, but they can help with identification of businesses and some of the street addresses.

    Usually rural and city carriers are helpful and are knowledgeable of the neighborhood.
    Last edited by FIRE117; 02-27-2010 at 10:59 PM. Reason: Spelling

  24. #24
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Dickey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    5,112

    Default

    All of these are great suggestions.

    However, your county Planning and Development Office will always have the most up to day satellite or aerial photos on file and most likely, the most current maps of an area or town.
    Jason Knecht
    Assistant Chief
    Altoona Fire Dept.
    Altoona, WI

    IACOJ - Director of Cheese and Whine
    http://www.cheddarvision.tv/
    EAT CHEESE OR DIE!!

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Thread killer
    By jerrygarcia in forum The Off Duty Forums
    Replies: 5499
    Last Post: 08-24-2014, 10:18 PM
  2. Chief Lepore - Thank you for your book "Smoke Your Firefighter Interview"
    By trent808 in forum Hiring & Employment Discussion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-13-2009, 07:49 PM
  3. NIOSH & State Refute IAFF Houston Claims
    By Firewalker1 in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 59
    Last Post: 12-13-2002, 09:51 PM
  4. Help a vol cant make 4 calls a month!
    By firefighterf_07 in forum Volunteer Forum
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 05-18-2002, 11:15 PM
  5. Thermal Imaging SOG's
    By wtfd92 in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 06-27-2001, 09:41 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Log in

Click here to log in or register