1. #1
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    Default Fire Behavior Demonstrations

    I have a FFII Fire Behavior class coming up in March. I'm looking for some good demonstrations to use to teach the basics - flash point, LEL/UEL, surface area, heat transfer, flame spread, etc.

    What do you use? Any links or ideas would be great.

    Thanks!

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    One super simple little trick that seems to baffle unknowing students and civilians is to take two zip lock bags. Blow one up and seal it with the air inside, fill the other with water. Than hold up the air filled bag and hold a lighter below it and show how fast it melts (and burns if the flame is too close). Next do the same thing with the water filled bag. The won't melt as the water absorbs the heat. Again, don't get the flame to close or the water won't absorb fast enough to overcome the heat, but at he same 3-4 inches below it's an eye opener. Probably need NFPA permission and a 1403 briefing to conduct this nowadays.

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    RFD very nice, yeah don't forget your hood and scba too. Check out UL or NIST they have a lot of stuff and it's all on line.

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    Default CAFS handline failures

    The police crime lab found that the burst hose line could be connected with the hose's high exposure to radiant heat on the first upper floor. It was found that at temperatures of around 394°F (200°C), hoses fail sooner when filled with compressed-air foam than when filled with water. The reason lies in the reduced water contents and thus in the reduced heat capacity of foam.

    Based on these findings, the state chief fire officer of Baden-Württemberg issued a leaflet on using CAFS for structural firefighting, which was later adopted by other German states. This leaflet states the hoses used with compressed-air foam can fail sooner than hoses lines with water. This was observed under radiant exposure as well as when exposing the hose lines to glowing embers. The measured time differences are several minutes with water versus within a minute for CAFS. It gets more critical if the compressed-air foam does not flow because the nozzle is closed. Fire departments are advised not to use CAFS, if the hose lines may be exposed to heat or hot particles in due course of the operations.

    During firefighting operations, the exposure of hose lines to heat or hot particles is a given. Compressed-air foam could however be used for single room-and-contents fire with a safe attack route in a brick-and-stone environment. Yet even in a brick-and-stone environment there usually will be combustible furniture, wall decorations, partitions or false walls, that expose hose lines to heat or hot particles. A safe attack route — as well as a safe escape route can only be attested in retrospect — when the fire is out, and the troops are all out again.

    Same principle as the demonstration. Has anyone experienced this here in the states? I don't recall reading anything about this type of hazard wtih CAF hoselines.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RFDACM02 View Post
    One super simple little trick that seems to baffle unknowing students and civilians is to take two zip lock bags. Blow one up and seal it with the air inside, fill the other with water. Than hold up the air filled bag and hold a lighter below it and show how fast it melts (and burns if the flame is too close). Next do the same thing with the water filled bag. The won't melt as the water absorbs the heat. Again, don't get the flame to close or the water won't absorb fast enough to overcome the heat, but at he same 3-4 inches below it's an eye opener. (
    Thanks RFD - I'll be using that, except with balloons instead of the bags.

    I've also got ignition of steel wool vs. steel nail to illustrate surface area, warming diesel to illustrate flash point/fire point, heating a metal rod on one end so it lights a match on the other to illustrate conduction, using propane vs. methane to illustrate vapor density.

    What else?

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