Why register? ...To Enhance Your Experience
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    17

    Default Academy Training (Stairs)

    Hi all,

    I'm trying to get into the local college for the basic firefighting program (NFPA level 1 and 2), and I'm getting some very contradictory training advice. I was hoping someone here might have an opinion they'd be willing to share.

    Right now, I can't do much - I'm a full time undergrad student, with a pretty harsh course load, so I fit in what I can. I typically run stairs MWF before classes (about 80 stories (20 x up and down a 5 story building) in 40 minutes, w/ turnout jacket / pants and heavy boots), swim TThSa (about 40 lengths, or 1 km, in about 45 minutes), and go for runs in the evening whenever I get a chance (maybe 3 or 4 times a week, again in turnout gear/boots, 5-10km walking/running). Going to the gym to workout hasn't happened much lately, but hopefully I can get back into that in the next little while.

    The college has a physical trainer that normally gives advice - unfortunately, they aren't running a class this winter, and so he isn't around, and no one else wants to offer advice due to liability (its amazing how scared we all are of getting sued).

    The volunteer fire dept. a few towns over gave me what I'm doing now - that is, wear as much gear as I can, to get used to the weight and (mostly) heat, use a weight vest when I get to that level, and run stairs as much as I can.

    The University's personal trainer didn't take well to that advice - I've actually been banned from the gym for trying to use a weight vest or wearing turnout gear. They say that using any body weights when running, doing stairs, etc is dangerous, pointless, and stupid. That includes ankle weights, weight vests, wrist weights, or even carrying dumbbells or a backpack while running on the track.

    So, what do I do? Keep running with gear, adding weight as I can? Or drop the gear, drop all weight, and do interval training on the track?

    The decision is mostly made hard by the fact that the fire chief at the volunteer dept. has been there for over 20 years, and has trained quite a few guys for the college, but the personal trainers at the university are all masters or PhDs in kineseology, and have consulted for another fire college in the area.

    I'm lost. Help? Thanks in advance.


  2. #2
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    21

    Default Just my thoughts

    I would say the more you do in your gear in the more comfortable you'll be in your gear.I'm not a p.h.d. or anything but it seems like common sense to me.Obviously, you wouldn't want to take a ten mile run in your turnout gear if it's a hundred out.I just joined my local vol. dept and am using a workout plan my old football coach sent me.It focuses much more on overall body strengh than building one particular group.Also, alot of sites I visted suggested building lung strengh by doing things like wind sprints.

  3. #3
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Longwood, FL
    Posts
    43

    Default

    In a sense the PT at the gym are somewhat right... You shouldn't RUN with ankle weights, and a lot of extra (ie weight vest on). The extra impact of a run combined with added weight will be very hard on your knees and could end up hurting you in the end... Doing stairs with a weight vest though isn't bad since you don't really run, it's more of a brisk walk up and down the stairs.
    Again I'm no pro but it sounds like you have a decent work out regiment but just be careful with the running with weight stuff

  4. #4
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    26

    Default Who is right?

    I can understand why you are so confused. There is so much information out there, but who is right? I have been training firefighters for over 4 years now and I always push them to the max. My theory is if you are going to perform that way in a fire why wouldn't you train that way when you exercise. Traditional training is why so many firefighter get hurt.

    I do believe that you need to train smart and currently you are over training. Think about it this way; would you train the biceps every day? I would hope not.

    Here is what you need to do:

    1st) Change your routine every time. A routine is bad and will cause you to plateau. When you run stairs change up your speed and the weight that you are carrying/wearing. This will confuse the body and you will achieve amazing results.

    2nd) Enjoy being a student and use that to your benefit. Since you are busy you can use that time to rest and let you body recover. Like I said you wouldn't traine biceps every day.

    3rd) If you are looking for quick workouts that incorporate weights then down load my free book "21 Day Rapid Fat Loss Workout". Don't worry I named it this because it will help you lose fat, by gaining lean muscle mass. These workouts are also designed to build endurance and strength.


    If you would like I could put you into touch with some of the firefighters I work with so they can tell you the benefit of my program. I hope this helps. If you have any questions let me know.

  5. #5
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    2

    Default Rapid weight loss!

    I have been using this program and believe it has really helped me. I like the short workouts and the training is something we use on the fire scene. I am see great benefits! GIVE IT A TRY!

  6. #6
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    LI
    Posts
    78

    Default

    1st thing: stop running and doing stairs in Bunker gear. Absolutely pointless to get in shape for the job.
    do lots of cardio (running, swimming, biking). Find a stairmaster and use that. Do that with a 40 lb vest for like 6 or 7 minutes to get used to the weight and a workout in. Stairs can be a killer w/ all that gear. get used to them!

  7. #7
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fdny84 View Post
    1st thing: stop running and doing stairs in Bunker gear. Absolutely pointless to get in shape for the job.... Stairs can be a killer w/ all that gear. get used to them!
    With all due respect, its quotes like this that make things confusing. You say to stop running and doing stairs in bunker gear because its pointless, but then say I should get used to doing stairs with all that gear?

    The biggest thing I find with wearing gear isn't the weight, its the heat - I can easily run a hundred stories with a 20 pound backpack on, but with 20 pounds worth of gear, I have problems making it 80 stories, and about a third of that ends up being walking. Is there something other than wearing gear that would be a better way to get used to going full out when your body can't cool itself down?

    Thanks

  8. #8
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    123

    Default

    1. Never run while wearing a weight vest.

    2. Don't wear turnout gear and run the stairs.

    3. Don't wear turnout gear into any public places unless its deemed necessary by the job due to contamination.

    4. Dont run in your gear.

    5. Dont run in your boots.

  9. #9
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    21

    Default

    I would definetly agree with 601 about wearing your gear in public.Besided the issue of what might be on your gear, seeing a guy in turnout out gear running up the stairs generally freaks people out for obvious reasons.I would also suggest to try working in your gear if you have an area to do this.I live in a rural area so sometimes early in the morning I get up and pick some random task, such as dig a hole or get a big sledge and beat the hell out of a rock, and do that as hard and as long as I can.This helps me get used to moving and operating in my gear.I'm pretty new to the fire service so I'm just trying to get comfortable in my gear.Some of these guys who have been in the fire service awhile really don't have an issue with this.

  10. #10
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Volunteer18 View Post
    I would definetly agree with 601 about wearing your gear in public.Besided the issue of what might be on your gear, seeing a guy in turnout out gear running up the stairs generally freaks people out for obvious reasons.
    That angle, I can agree with. Thats why I run stairs in one of my faculties buildings, in a staircase thats seldom used (it leads only to restricted areas). Every person in the building knows what I'm doing and why, and its done before classes start, so there are no other students in the area.

    Not that its strange or alarming to see firefighters around that part of campus - we get an average of 2-3 visits per day by the fire dept.

    Is the public perception the reason allot of people say not to train in gear? I'm not trying to say Rescue601 is wrong or anything of the sort, I just find it hard to weigh the validity of things with no explanation.

  11. #11
    Forum Member pasobuff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Loverly upstate NY
    Posts
    1,734

    Default

    There is public perception, especially with the heightened awareness people have these days.....also, think about it - if you are using 'in service' gear - you are wearing it....adding wear and tear to it also......then there is of course the odor.....lol.....the accumulated smoke smell really comes out when you are in a 'clean' area!

  12. #12
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    21

    Default

    I would also add that you never know whats on you gear besides just a smoke smell.You could have dangerous chemicals from a fire scene on the outside of your gear that would never affect the wearer.I just went through my vol. dept initial training and my instructor told us to avoid even bringing our gear in our houses because of possible contamanation.As far as replicating the heat of your gear you could just put on enough layers to roughly equal your gear.I have some Carhart bibs that I wear around the farm.If you put on those and a heavy coat over your regular clothes that should get you fairly close to your gear.
    Last edited by Volunteer18; 03-14-2010 at 06:22 PM.

  13. #13
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    17

    Default

    The gear that I have has never seen a fire - it was a backup set owned by a volunteer firefighter. It was used a couple of times for school visits and training, then sent off to be washed, and then put in storage. So, there are no smoke smells, chemicals, etc on it, nor will there be any time in the future - I'm not with a dept and, due to liability, none of the depts around here will even do ride alongs anymore.

    I've covered my bases in that regard - the gear has no contaminants on it, no smoke smell, etc; everyone in the building knows who I am and what I am doing; there are no windows on the stairwell, so no one outside will see me; I work with the security dept as part of my part time job, so they all know me and what I'm doing; I co-ordinate with the faculty to make sure that I'm not around any time an experiment that may require FD presence is ongoing.

    I've been running the stairs 3 days a week for the past 3 weeks, in gear, and its the first workout I can say I'm actually seeing results from, and enjoying the process of. Only 3 weeks ago I could barely go up 50 floors, about 20 of which I ended up walking. Last time, I made it 45 stories running, and another 35 walking. I think after another 2 or 3 weeks of doing it with full gear on, I'll be able to start adding in the weight vest, with a few pounds. My eventual goal is 100 floors with the equivalent weight of an SCBA (~40 pounds?), running the whole way.

  14. #14
    Forum Member Tipys's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    244

    Default

    First off. Stop whereing the gear. You keep trying to justify it stop.

    Stop running. Up the stairs with gear if your going to run them just run them in what you would wear at the gym.
    There is no point to running in gear. 1 you DO NOT RUN ON FIREGROUNDS or AT A CALL.
    The time you save by running on a call is not worth the risk of you falling and getting hurt. If you fall that is going to put atleast 2 more firefighters out of the game with yourself. So 3 people can't help put out the fire because you wanted to run.

    What you want to do is get a weight vest and walk up those stairs.
    Or get on a stair master at the gym.

    I myself have not bought a weight vest yet but I am spending about an hour on the stair master walking up. I believe I was up 200 stories in an hours time.
    RIP Hela

    "You have to do better then your best."
    BUD's instuctor Class 234


    "A man who won't die for something is not fit to live."
    Martin Luther King, Jr

  15. #15
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    1

    Default

    Run, stair master, n use another elliptical machine all in 60 minutes...only use the weighted vest on the stair master. Its good to use light weights instead of heavy weights when lifting. More reps with 3-4 sets..oh and don't 4 get push ups, push ups n more push ups

  16. #16
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    332

    Default

    Carry a 30lb (or more) dumbell in each hand, walk quickly up and down flight of stairs 3 times. Quick feet goin up, careful goin down.
    Run a 1/4 mile (should be sub 8min mile pace, or <2min lap).
    Repeat for 4 sets.

    Carry a 45lb plate or sandbag up stairs quickly, then "push press" it 10 times, carry it back down.
    http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/...PushPress.html
    Do 10 sets.

    Carry a 40lb+ dumbell in each hand, walk quickly up stairs. At top landing do 20 single arm bent rows for each arm, quickly, like you're swimming with the weights if you can picture that. Carry back down.
    Do 10 sets.

    Carry 40lb+ dumbell in each arm, walk quickly up and down stairs. Put weights down and drag something ( a tire, a boxing heavy bag, whatever) that weighs 100lbs or more. Drag it 50 yards or so.
    Repeat for 10 sets.

    These evolutions, or some variation on them, are ideas of good cardio/strength workouts that are applicable to firefighting, in my opinion.

    Keep track of times. Look for improvement!
    Builds cardio, leg strength, and the often overlooked grip strength.

    No need to wear turnouts while working out.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Proposed NFPA 1001 changes for 2007
    By SWLAFireDawg in forum Volunteer Forum
    Replies: 83
    Last Post: 06-23-2007, 05:42 PM
  2. New probie here....
    By kweb75 in forum Probie House: The Place for Newbies
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 05-25-2007, 02:49 AM
  3. HOUSTON walked away from this contract
    By Firewalker1 in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 71
    Last Post: 05-17-2007, 12:34 AM
  4. Live FIRE Training!
    By PaulGRIMWOOD in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 57
    Last Post: 11-11-2005, 04:48 PM
  5. Osceola County Florida Training Deaths...Discussion
    By captstanm1 in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 178
    Last Post: 05-26-2005, 07:14 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts