1. #1
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    Question Where The Heck is Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug, Ontario

    Troops Get Hands-On Training in Ice Rescue: Ex Polar Warrior, Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug, Ontario

    Lt Frank Monozlai, Public Affairs Officer, 32 CBG

    Imagine walking over a frozen lake when the ice suddenly breaks, plunging you into the frigid waters below. You need to get out of there fast, but how? And if there are others around, what can they do?

    Those life-and-death questions were the subject of the ice rescue stand at Exercise Polar Warrior 2009, where 32 Brigade's Arctic Response Company Group (led by the Grey and Simcoe Foresters) trained with the Canadian Rangers in Kitchenuhmaykoosib from February 27 to March 7. Invited to train there by Chief Donny Morris, the company and all of its equipment were flown into the remote town of 1,400 people on the shores of Big Trout Lake. The alternative route to this community some 600 kilometres north of Thunder Bay involves a lengthy drive on seasonal ice roads that start where the permanent roads end. Cell phones don't work in Kitchenuhmaykoosib.

    The cold, rugged and isolated location is ideal to exercise a self-supporting Arctic response unit in winter operations. After shaking themselves out from their journey, camping in the cold woods and getting comfortable in their winter gear, the soldiers switched to stand training for their last three days in the field. Shooting, making survival shelters, living off the land, ice fishing and ice rescue were covered under the guidance of the Canadian Rangers.

    For the ice rescue, soldiers donned dry suits, plunged into a hole in the ice and practiced different ways of pulling themselves from the frigid water.

    "We want to give the soldiers hands-on experience in dealing with the hazards of a fall through the ice," says Warrant Officer Rob Patterson of 3 Canadian Ranger Patrol Group. "After harnessing them up to a rope and pulley, the soldiers are first given a chance to extract themselves un-assisted. Then they try using ice picks." The soldiers aren't just trained to escape on their own, though. "We then show them how to help a buddy get out of the water," adds the Warrant, "and finally just pull them out with the rope and pulley system."

    The soldiers wore the suits over their uniforms (minus the mukluks) with neoprene gloves and a hood to cover their hands and head. For added safety, the suit also acts as a floatation device and keeps them surprisingly warm. Despite initial reservations, even those who could barely swim got into the water after watching their friends. Cheering each other on as they struggled to get out of the water, the more adventurous were inspired to plunge into the water with cannonballs and belly-flops. All of this left the soldiers completely exhausted.

    There were also, of course, lessons on the treatment for hypothermia. Under the direction of the Canadian Rangers, the troops quickly built a fire, put together some shelter and provided first aid to a notional casualty pulled from the freezing water.

    "This training gives us the opportunity to practice skills that city people don't regularly do," says Corporal Graham Green of the Queen's Own Rifles of Canada. "It was great to get training from Rangers who are so experienced in living off the land."

    The exercise ended with a community day in Kitchenuhmaykoosib, where the soldiers mingled with the locals at a school before heading to a feast at the community centre. The menu included beaver, moose, caribou, lake trout and snow goose. In appreciation of the visit, Chief Donny Morris presented the Brigade Commander (Colonel Mann flew in for the occasion) with two very high honours: an eagle feather and pipe of Canada. "I initially didn't think that I'd go in the water, but am really glad that I did."

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    Default Where the heck!

    I sincerly believe it is a couple of "kliks" down the road from---

    Taumatawhakatangihangakoauauotamateaturipukakapiki maungahoronukupokaiwhenuakitanatahu


    Longest place name in Kiwi Land
    "If you thought it was hard getting into the job--wait until you have to hang the "fire gear"up and walk away!"
    Harry Lauder 1981.Me on the left!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tooanfrom View Post
    I sincerly believe it is a couple of "kliks" down the road from---

    Taumatawhakatangihangakoauauotamateaturipukakapiki maungahoronukupokaiwhenuakitanatahu


    Longest place name in Kiwi Land
    HAHA I suspect the longest place name for ANYWHERE.

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    "Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug?Whacha wanna do is go down the glacier to your right,take a hard left,go about fourteen kilometres til you see the polar bears.Make you a right and go till you see Pierre's igloo.Tell him we said 'Hey'."

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    The locals must have been laughing their (donkeys) off at the soldiers jumping into a lake on purpose.I bet a few guys took the opportunity to actually tell someone to "Go jump in a lake".
    Me?I've had a long standing policy on cold water survival.Stay on the boat or barge,don't go into the water and I won't have to worry about surviving in it.

    Quote Originally Posted by MalahatTwo7 View Post
    Troops Get Hands-On Training in Ice Rescue: Ex Polar Warrior, Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug, Ontario

    Lt Frank Monozlai, Public Affairs Officer, 32 CBG

    Imagine walking over a frozen lake when the ice suddenly breaks, plunging you into the frigid waters below. You need to get out of there fast, but how? And if there are others around, what can they do?

    Those life-and-death questions were the subject of the ice rescue stand at Exercise Polar Warrior 2009, where 32 Brigade's Arctic Response Company Group (led by the Grey and Simcoe Foresters) trained with the Canadian Rangers in Kitchenuhmaykoosib from February 27 to March 7. Invited to train there by Chief Donny Morris, the company and all of its equipment were flown into the remote town of 1,400 people on the shores of Big Trout Lake. The alternative route to this community some 600 kilometres north of Thunder Bay involves a lengthy drive on seasonal ice roads that start where the permanent roads end. Cell phones don't work in Kitchenuhmaykoosib.

    The cold, rugged and isolated location is ideal to exercise a self-supporting Arctic response unit in winter operations. After shaking themselves out from their journey, camping in the cold woods and getting comfortable in their winter gear, the soldiers switched to stand training for their last three days in the field. Shooting, making survival shelters, living off the land, ice fishing and ice rescue were covered under the guidance of the Canadian Rangers.

    For the ice rescue, soldiers donned dry suits, plunged into a hole in the ice and practiced different ways of pulling themselves from the frigid water.

    "We want to give the soldiers hands-on experience in dealing with the hazards of a fall through the ice," says Warrant Officer Rob Patterson of 3 Canadian Ranger Patrol Group. "After harnessing them up to a rope and pulley, the soldiers are first given a chance to extract themselves un-assisted. Then they try using ice picks." The soldiers aren't just trained to escape on their own, though. "We then show them how to help a buddy get out of the water," adds the Warrant, "and finally just pull them out with the rope and pulley system."

    The soldiers wore the suits over their uniforms (minus the mukluks) with neoprene gloves and a hood to cover their hands and head. For added safety, the suit also acts as a floatation device and keeps them surprisingly warm. Despite initial reservations, even those who could barely swim got into the water after watching their friends. Cheering each other on as they struggled to get out of the water, the more adventurous were inspired to plunge into the water with cannonballs and belly-flops. All of this left the soldiers completely exhausted.

    There were also, of course, lessons on the treatment for hypothermia. Under the direction of the Canadian Rangers, the troops quickly built a fire, put together some shelter and provided first aid to a notional casualty pulled from the freezing water.

    "This training gives us the opportunity to practice skills that city people don't regularly do," says Corporal Graham Green of the Queen's Own Rifles of Canada. "It was great to get training from Rangers who are so experienced in living off the land."

    The exercise ended with a community day in Kitchenuhmaykoosib, where the soldiers mingled with the locals at a school before heading to a feast at the community centre. The menu included beaver, moose, caribou, lake trout and snow goose. In appreciation of the visit, Chief Donny Morris presented the Brigade Commander (Colonel Mann flew in for the occasion) with two very high honours: an eagle feather and pipe of Canada. "I initially didn't think that I'd go in the water, but am really glad that I did."

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    Talking

    Actually I think its one big sentence:

    Kitchen uh may koosib Inn inu wug

    Translation: In the Kitchen at the Inn, you may find the beer jug.

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    Default Where The Heck is Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug, Ontario

    I am a transportation engineering student in Ontario, and have driven Highway 69 on many occasions and can't find a non political reason for the fast-tracking of Highway 69 improvements between Parry Sound and Estaire. Yes, the highway will need to eventually be twinned however, traffic volumes simply aren't there yet. Highway 69 is once again by in large a very well designed highway, with excellent passing opportunity. From an operational standpoint it would be much more logical for the MTO to improve Highway 17 on either side of Sudbury, as to the west is quite busy, and to the east has poor geometry.

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    There are some strange place names in Alberta as well. my favorite, " Head Smashed in Buffalo Jump"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Neven Mrgan View Post
    I am a transportation engineering student in Ontario, and have driven Highway 69 on many occasions and can't find a non political reason for the fast-tracking of Highway 69 improvements between Parry Sound and Estaire. Yes, the highway will need to eventually be twinned however, traffic volumes simply aren't there yet. Highway 69 is once again by in large a very well designed highway, with excellent passing opportunity. From an operational standpoint it would be much more logical for the MTO to improve Highway 17 on either side of Sudbury, as to the west is quite busy, and to the east has poor geometry.

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    Not sure where Highway 69 or 17 got into this, as they are both about 80 miles SOUTH of Highway 11, which is sort of "close" to where Kitchen.... is, somewhere off Rte 631, between Marathon and Hearst, kinda/sorta.

    As for "well designed" for the remainder of your comments.... Unless things have drastically changed, any highway west of Kenora and east of Banff have been the best maintained - although its been a few years since I last travelled that way by road. It didnt take a road sign to tell me that I had "Left Ontario and Entered Manatoba" or Alberta, west into BC.

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