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  1. #1
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    Default What All Can We Do??

    I'm a junior,and is there any training that us junior firefighters can do to help us as we procede in the future?.Thanks
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    Forum Member mtg55's Avatar
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    I'm sure there is plenty. As I tell all newbies, if your dept has an SOG on juniors (which they should) learn them. Also, refer to your states Child Labor Laws. They are the laws of the land, and should give you a pretty clear look at what you are aloud to do by law. Once you know these, you can find a lot of activities to participate in that will build up what you know/need to know.
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    Some quick and easy training that you can do is take some of the NIMS courses on the FEMA website:

    http://www.fema.gov/emergency/nims/N...ses.shtm#item1

    IS 100.a and IS 700.a are probably the two that you'll want to start with and then continue with others as time allows and that relate to your response area. They are independent study (i.e. you can take as long as you need to do them) and best of all, they are FREE.

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    Forum Member RS1606's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtg55 View Post
    I'm sure there is plenty. As I tell all newbies, if your dept has an SOG on juniors (which they should) learn them. Also, refer to your states Child Labor Laws. They are the laws of the land, and should give you a pretty clear look at what you are aloud to do by law. Once you know these, you can find a lot of activities to participate in that will build up what you know/need to know.
    as i quickly learnd on here, is that what your department alowes you to do, may not always be right. so keep that in mind.
    Firefighters need not fear fire, but give it all their respect.

  5. #5
    Forum Member FWDbuff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Palmers_Jr View Post
    I'm a junior,and is there any training that us junior firefighters can do to help us as we procede in the future?.Thanks
    1. Do not use "text speak" here on the Firehouse.com (or any other professionally-oriented forums.) Use it between your buddies and your girlfriend in texts, but in here, we are all professionals. Speak using the English language.

    2. Stay out of the TV/Recreation Room. When you are in the firehouse, and you have idle time, you should be out in the Engine bays, studying the equipment. Open the compartments. Know where everything is located. And I mean EVERYTHING. As a Junior, one of your jobs is going to be the "gofer." So knowing where equipment is stored is absolutely critical for you.

    3. When you get bored of studying equipment locations, study it some more.

    4. When you get absolutely bored of studying equipment locations, go clean something. Nothing burns my butt more than if I come into the firehouse and one of my Juniors is sitting in the TV/Recreation room, and then I walk out into the engine bay and one (or all) of the rigs are dirty. That strange sensation that he/she then feels in the seat of his/her pants is my foot. Make sure the trucks are all washed, wiped down, and the chrome is polished.

    5. After the rigs are clean, start opening compartments and emptying them out. Clean the compartments. Clean the equipment as you put it back into the compartments. Study the locations of the equipment as you put it back into the compartments.

    6. Get the help of a senior member, and make sure all the hand tools are properly painted. Striking surfaces should not be painted and free of rust and corrosion. All tool handles should be free of burrs, splinters, or cracks. Make sure all paint looks good, and any wooden handles are varnished, sanded, and re-varnished.

    7. After the rigs and compartments are all squared away, pick up a broom. Go sweep something. Empty trash cans. Vacuum the carpets in the offices. Now you are allowed into the TV/Rec room (but it's not to sit down and watch TV.)

    Part of being a member of the team is having COMPANY PRIDE. If your equipment looks good, then YOU look good. And when you look good, then you will FEEL good.

    8. When all of the above is done, stay out of the TV/Rec room. Get an IFSTA Firefighter I manual, go find a quiet place, and study it.

    There is no reason for you to be in the TV/Rec room for the first 2 years of your membership. Maybe, just maybe....On a hot saturday afternoon after everyone has tested all of the hose, maybe, just maybe you will be allowed in there for some pizza and soda. Maybe. The less time you spend in the TV/Rec room, the more you will pay attention to detail and learn your place in this world, learn your equipment, and learn pride, which all lead to professionalism.

    Here is a little training video on Company Pride and being a team member:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nxKfp...eature=related
    Last edited by FWDbuff; 04-17-2010 at 07:57 AM.
    "Loyalty Above all Else. Except Honor."

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    Forum Member mtg55's Avatar
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    Going off of what Buff said, we have a mentoring/indoc program that all new jrs/probies go through. They get tested on each truck, equipment location and terms, SCBA use (more towards changing bottles), seating assignments and finally hydrant qualification. I know a lot of departments may not have similar programs, mine did not when I was a Jr. However I set goals for myself to get qual'ed on the hydrant and know the apparatus within a certain time frame, and I periodically quized myself on the equipment. A good way to keep up with where everything is after you are riding is go over the apparatus with other new members. Good luck.
    Matt G.
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  7. #7
    Forum Member Explorer Asst Chief Fern's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FWDbuff View Post
    ......
    4. When you get absolutely bored of studying equipment locations, go clean something. Nothing burns my butt more than if I come into the firehouse and one of my Juniors is sitting in the TV/Recreation room, and then I walk out into the engine bay and one (or all) of the rigs are dirty. That strange sensation that he/she then feels in the seat of his/her pants is my foot. Make sure the trucks are all washed, wiped down, and the chrome is polished.

    5. After the rigs are clean, start opening compartments and emptying them out. Clean the compartments. Clean the equipment as you put it back into the compartments. Study the locations of the equipment as you put it back into the compartments.

    6. Get the help of a senior member, and make sure all the hand tools are properly painted. Striking surfaces should not be painted and free of rust and corrosion. All tool handles should be free of burrs, splinters, or cracks. Make sure all paint looks good, and any wooden handles are varnished, sanded, and re-varnished.

    7. After the rigs and compartments are all squared away, pick up a broom. Go sweep something. Empty trash cans. Vacuum the carpets in the offices. Now you are allowed into the TV/Rec room (but it's not to sit down and watch TV.)

    Part of being a member of the team is having COMPANY PRIDE. If your equipment looks good, then YOU look good. And when you look good, then you will FEEL good.
    ........
    I'm not sure how what the duties of your explorers are, and I mean no offence in what I am about to say, but at my department explorers DO NOT get pushed around. If something is dirty, the duty crew are the ones responsible (AND PAID) to clean it. If an explorer participates on a call they MUST help wash the trucks when they get back, but they are not forced to go wash things just because they are dirty. Our job is to learn about firefighting and EMS so that one day we can take care of YOU. We have had plenty of firefighters push explorers around to "go clean this, then go put that away" and those firefighters will get in trouble by Chief. Yes, I have cleaned the station before on my own free will (not because I'm a woman and that's what women do) because I have extra time and I was bored. At my department you will never see explorers or even probies get pushed around to do "bitch work" because that is not how a department should be run.
    Explorer Assistant Chief Alisha Fern

    Leadership: The ability to guide, direct, and influence others.

    Leadership can be thought of as a capacity to define oneself to others in a way that clarifies and expands a vision of the future.


    alisha.fern@firehousemail.com

  8. #8
    Forum Member RS1606's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FWDbuff View Post
    1. Do not use "text speak" here on the Firehouse.com (or any other professionally-oriented forums.) Use it between your buddies and your girlfriend in texts, but in here, we are all professionals. Speak using the English language.

    2. Stay out of the TV/Recreation Room. When you are in the firehouse, and you have idle time, you should be out in the Engine bays, studying the equipment. Open the compartments. Know where everything is located. And I mean EVERYTHING. As a Junior, one of your jobs is going to be the "gofer." So knowing where equipment is stored is absolutely critical for you.

    3. When you get bored of studying equipment locations, study it some more.

    4. When you get absolutely bored of studying equipment locations, go clean something. Nothing burns my butt more than if I come into the firehouse and one of my Juniors is sitting in the TV/Recreation room, and then I walk out into the engine bay and one (or all) of the rigs are dirty. That strange sensation that he/she then feels in the seat of his/her pants is my foot. Make sure the trucks are all washed, wiped down, and the chrome is polished.

    5. After the rigs are clean, start opening compartments and emptying them out. Clean the compartments. Clean the equipment as you put it back into the compartments. Study the locations of the equipment as you put it back into the compartments.

    6. Get the help of a senior member, and make sure all the hand tools are properly painted. Striking surfaces should not be painted and free of rust and corrosion. All tool handles should be free of burrs, splinters, or cracks. Make sure all paint looks good, and any wooden handles are varnished, sanded, and re-varnished.

    7. After the rigs and compartments are all squared away, pick up a broom. Go sweep something. Empty trash cans. Vacuum the carpets in the offices. Now you are allowed into the TV/Rec room (but it's not to sit down and watch TV.)

    Part of being a member of the team is having COMPANY PRIDE. If your equipment looks good, then YOU look good. And when you look good, then you will FEEL good.

    8. When all of the above is done, stay out of the TV/Rec room. Get an IFSTA Firefighter I manual, go find a quiet place, and study it.

    There is no reason for you to be in the TV/Rec room for the first 2 years of your membership. Maybe, just maybe....On a hot saturday afternoon after everyone has tested all of the hose, maybe, just maybe you will be allowed in there for some pizza and soda. Maybe. The less time you spend in the TV/Rec room, the more you will pay attention to detail and learn your place in this world, learn your equipment, and learn pride, which all lead to professionalism.

    Here is a little training video on Company Pride and being a team member:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nxKfp...eature=related
    supriseingly, i try my best to not sit down and do nothing, i usaly stay in the bay and clean the trucks, go over the trucks, wax the trucks, clean the station, and study time is the only time i realy sit down untill around 6 or 7 pm. then the firefighters will come tell me to watch a movie or something. Oh! The only other time i sit down is to eat.
    Firefighters need not fear fire, but give it all their respect.

  9. #9
    Forum Member FWDbuff's Avatar
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    Alisha, I am dissapointed that you failied to see the objective of all of the cleaning duties.

    First of all, we don't have explorers. We have Junior Firefighters, which are full-fledged, responding members between the ages of 16 and 18. You join our company, and complete a one-year probation period from the time you are accepted as a member. After your one-year probation, you are allowed to vote on issues, even if you are still under the age of 18. On responses, if you are qualifed to ride, you may do so as long as there is an open seat available on the responding unit. We do not allow members to go directly to the scene, as a result, we have assigned duty crews between the hours of 6 to 11pm, and then we have assigned overnight crews from 11am to 6am. Bottom line: they are official members, and they spend a lot of time in quarters.

    That being said, we do have paid personnel: One career paramedic is on staff 24/7/365. We also have one career FF/EMT on staff Monday through Fridays from 6am to 6pm.

    In our house, it is everyone's responsibility to make sure everything is clean and ready to go. The Career Staff is not responsible for this alone. The Medic has enough to do with making sure things go smoothly on his end with his paperwork....Everyone picks up the brooms and mops, etc.

    However, when you are a Junior in our house, there are expectations placed upon you requiring you to know your equipment and your place as a member of the team. Culturally, our Juniors are expected to take care of the equipment without being asked. They should automatically know when they need to wash a truck, paint a tool, or empty a trash can. If they have time to sit on their butts when in the station, and there is a dirty truck out in the bay, then they certainly have time to get off of said butt and go clean it.

    This helps them gain a sense of pride and being a member of the team, as well as knowledge of their equipment.
    "Loyalty Above all Else. Except Honor."

  10. #10
    Forum Member CGITCH's Avatar
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    I agree with the cleaning and "taking-care" part. Being a junior, as I am, the responsiblities are different. I may not be expected to be cleaning trucks and keeping things clean, but I do. With my old man being one of the most senior members, he expects me to do a damn good job. I better not be standing around when trucks are being washed or the station is being cleaned. Yesterday, for example, there was a call that I missed, but I drove by as they were just finishing washing trucks and putting stuff away. I made an attempt to make sure they were done with everything and they didn't need me. By going above and beyond, it shows that you have more worth than just being a pain in the *** down at the station. If there is a call, and I don't happen to be riding, I make damn sure I am running the radio or taking roster, then seeing if we are going to be filling tankers. If we are, I make sure everything is ready to go. If packs are used after the call, I make sure I'm there to help fill. After doing this for awhile, the respect I have gained is tremendous. Now instead of asking their fellow firefighters where something may go, I get asked where the tool goes. They like to see that I'm making an effort to get to know my stuff, because the expectations for me are higher than that of a senior member. I have to prove myself that I have worth. Now, I'm assigned to rig cleaning commitees and maitenence duties. And with these, I make sure my rig is spotless, and the best looking. Last time, I spent 8 hours on it. What the point of all of this is, is to build character. With the stuff I learn at the station, it now translates to the rest of my life. I'm much more disciplined about things.

  11. #11
    MembersZone Subscriber BULL321's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FWDbuff View Post
    1. Do not use "text speak" here on the Firehouse.com (or any other professionally-oriented forums.) Use it between your buddies and your girlfriend in texts, but in here, we are all professionals. Speak using the English language.

    2. Stay out of the TV/Recreation Room. When you are in the firehouse, and you have idle time, you should be out in the Engine bays, studying the equipment. Open the compartments. Know where everything is located. And I mean EVERYTHING. As a Junior, one of your jobs is going to be the "gofer." So knowing where equipment is stored is absolutely critical for you.

    3. When you get bored of studying equipment locations, study it some more.

    4. When you get absolutely bored of studying equipment locations, go clean something. Nothing burns my butt more than if I come into the firehouse and one of my Juniors is sitting in the TV/Recreation room, and then I walk out into the engine bay and one (or all) of the rigs are dirty. That strange sensation that he/she then feels in the seat of his/her pants is my foot. Make sure the trucks are all washed, wiped down, and the chrome is polished.

    5. After the rigs are clean, start opening compartments and emptying them out. Clean the compartments. Clean the equipment as you put it back into the compartments. Study the locations of the equipment as you put it back into the compartments.

    6. Get the help of a senior member, and make sure all the hand tools are properly painted. Striking surfaces should not be painted and free of rust and corrosion. All tool handles should be free of burrs, splinters, or cracks. Make sure all paint looks good, and any wooden handles are varnished, sanded, and re-varnished.

    7. After the rigs and compartments are all squared away, pick up a broom. Go sweep something. Empty trash cans. Vacuum the carpets in the offices. Now you are allowed into the TV/Rec room (but it's not to sit down and watch TV.)

    Part of being a member of the team is having COMPANY PRIDE. If your equipment looks good, then YOU look good. And when you look good, then you will FEEL good.

    8. When all of the above is done, stay out of the TV/Rec room. Get an IFSTA Firefighter I manual, go find a quiet place, and study it.

    There is no reason for you to be in the TV/Rec room for the first 2 years of your membership. Maybe, just maybe....On a hot saturday afternoon after everyone has tested all of the hose, maybe, just maybe you will be allowed in there for some pizza and soda. Maybe. The less time you spend in the TV/Rec room, the more you will pay attention to detail and learn your place in this world, learn your equipment, and learn pride, which all lead to professionalism.

    Here is a little training video on Company Pride and being a team member:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nxKfp...eature=related
    Preach it Brother, preach it! Nothing else need be said. Like it or lump it.
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  12. #12
    Forum Member RS1606's Avatar
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    ^ i agree with ya
    Last edited by RS1606; 04-21-2010 at 12:05 PM.
    Firefighters need not fear fire, but give it all their respect.

  13. #13
    Forum Member Explorer Asst Chief Fern's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FWDbuff View Post
    Alisha, I am dissapointed that you failied to see the objective of all of the cleaning duties.

    First of all, we don't have explorers. We have Junior Firefighters, which are full-fledged, responding members between the ages of 16 and 18. You join our company, and complete a one-year probation period from the time you are accepted as a member. After your one-year probation, you are allowed to vote on issues, even if you are still under the age of 18. On responses, if you are qualifed to ride, you may do so as long as there is an open seat available on the responding unit. We do not allow members to go directly to the scene, as a result, we have assigned duty crews between the hours of 6 to 11pm, and then we have assigned overnight crews from 11am to 6am. Bottom line: they are official members, and they spend a lot of time in quarters.

    That being said, we do have paid personnel: One career paramedic is on staff 24/7/365. We also have one career FF/EMT on staff Monday through Fridays from 6am to 6pm.

    In our house, it is everyone's responsibility to make sure everything is clean and ready to go. The Career Staff is not responsible for this alone. The Medic has enough to do with making sure things go smoothly on his end with his paperwork....Everyone picks up the brooms and mops, etc.

    However, when you are a Junior in our house, there are expectations placed upon you requiring you to know your equipment and your place as a member of the team. Culturally, our Juniors are expected to take care of the equipment without being asked. They should automatically know when they need to wash a truck, paint a tool, or empty a trash can. If they have time to sit on their butts when in the station, and there is a dirty truck out in the bay, then they certainly have time to get off of said butt and go clean it.

    This helps them gain a sense of pride and being a member of the team, as well as knowledge of their equipment.
    With all due respect, I understand the importance of knowing where the tools are and what they are used for. I myself spend 3-5 days a week at the fire station participating in any call that comes along. But the way you are talking makes it sound like when an explorer is at your station they are the only ones cleaning. Almost like the job of the duty crew becomes pushed upon the Jr's. At our station the firefighters/medics only have about 10-20 minutes of paperwork time after each call. With that said, there is PLENTY of time for them to help out with cleaning. With that said, most of the station maintenance is done right after we get back from calls. When we get back we restock trucks and wash them. So in 30 minutes or so, all of our trucks are clean and all the tools are secured away. Therefore any cleaning after that is something that should have already been done, and the crew has free time. If they want to spend that free time watching tv (we don't have a rec room) they can do so. On a 16 hour shift there is plenty of time to get all of the station chores done AND watch tv.
    Explorer Assistant Chief Alisha Fern

    Leadership: The ability to guide, direct, and influence others.

    Leadership can be thought of as a capacity to define oneself to others in a way that clarifies and expands a vision of the future.


    alisha.fern@firehousemail.com

  14. #14
    Forum Member RS1606's Avatar
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    at the departments that im in, yes the full members wash the trucks, and clean the tools. but thats all they do to take care of the truck, so when im down there i take it apon my self to wax and detail some of the trucks.
    if a station has a pole, i will shine it. i try to do anything to keep me busy when not on a call.
    Firefighters need not fear fire, but give it all their respect.

  15. #15
    Forum Member Beaver52's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RS1606 View Post
    as i quickly learnd on here, is that what your department alowes you to do, may not always be right. so keep that in mind.
    Apparently you didn't read number one.
    Kyle
    Upper Macungie Township Station 56, Allentown, PA
    Vigilant Hose Company #1, Shippensburg, PA

    The things I post do not reflect the views of the affiliations I belong to.

  16. #16
    Forum Member RS1606's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScooterUMT56 View Post
    Apparently you didn't read number one.
    do what?????
    Firefighters need not fear fire, but give it all their respect.

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